modernvictorian

Exterior paint for 1896 Victorian Folk style house in MA - updated

showing my home love
7 months ago
last modified: 6 months ago

Hi all - I am creating a new thread because previously I was looking for an exterior color to sell my home quickly. However, after much thought and conversation with some great people here, I decided to show this house some love before sending her off to her new home owners in the next 1-3 years. I'm looking for help with a color scheme that will showcase her beauty and show respect to it's Victorian history, while still fit in with the neighboring homes (link below where I tried to capture a 360 view of the neighborhood). I don't want to go overboard but wouldn't mind being the nicest house on the block. :)





I have painters here now prepping and I've contracted them for 3 colors. I will share the finished product when they are done (about 4 weeks).

Additional photos plus neighboring homes:

This Victorian Home needs your love

Please see the link above to my photo album which will show you the houses directly around me. I would love to hear your advice, tip, history lessons, etc. after you take a look. Thank you all!

Comments (707)

  • houssaon
    5 months ago

    Two BM options with SW Impressive Purple.


  • liasch
    5 months ago

    I kind of like the Benjamin Moore “a lazy afternoon… “It seems it might be light enough.

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  • PRO
    Flo Mangan
    5 months ago

    The lighter tones will look faded out. A punch of color is needed with a semi gloss finish for greater reflective quality. But up to you. Just giving depth of color info.

  • showing my home love
    Original Author
    5 months ago

    I like the purples and even some of the blues suggested. I thought I had BM Lazy Afternoon in house but I went thru all my paint cans (TOO many) and guess I don't. I will have to make a new samplize order this week.

    My painter went with satin because he said gloss and even semi-gloss would pick up too much of the imperfections of the leaded paint underneath. I trust him because he has 20 year paint experience (some were asking about semi-gloss) so wanted to add that.

  • PRO
    Flo Mangan
    5 months ago

    The DNA for SW Impulsive Purple is LRV 12 (low reflectiveness); Hue angle of 316 so it is in the warm Purple Hue family that makes it complimentary hue since it sits directly across from the Green/Yellow Hue family which is your main color Hue family and it has a strong level of Chroma which gives it the depth of color. Hope this data helps you decide.

    showing my home love thanked Flo Mangan
  • RedRyder
    5 months ago

    Not surprised the painter didn’t want the gloss finishes due to enhancing the imperfections. I had that problem with an old wood door on an old house before.

    showing my home love thanked RedRyder
  • PRO
    Design Interior South
    5 months ago

    I am going to say if this were my home and I only had $40 left to spend I would buy sand paper and porch paint and paint the porch and stairs myself and live with the blue doors.

  • showing my home love
    Original Author
    5 months ago
    last modified: 5 months ago

    Flo, I think this is very helpful and will give me a better grasp of color decisions in the future.

    @Design Interior South, sorry if I wasn't clear. The porch will be tackled later in the Fall or next year. I meant to say that I'd rather paint the doors ourselves with $40 paint rather than trying to make the blue color work with seasonal decor or rewiring new lights which could end up being hundreds $$.

  • showing my home love
    Original Author
    5 months ago

    I decided to check out the neighborhood today and a few houses down there is one with a similar light green color like mine with a purple door. I don't usually go that way to leave my house so didn't remember it until today. The trim looks like a medium green/gray (also on the porch rails). After seeing this in person, I'm leaning more towards the berry colors for the door. Is their a tool that can show me what is a lighter version of BM Jester? For some reason that color is not in my color deck and my store didn't have any color cards.


  • katinparadise
    5 months ago
    last modified: 5 months ago

    What do you think of something like BM Summer Plum?


    Or Vintage Claret?

    Berry Fizz has a bit more red.


    showing my home love thanked katinparadise
  • liasch
    5 months ago

    This is where you need Flo and her analysis, as well as some actual samples to look at at the site. It’s clear that the jester is going to be too dark from the house that you photographed. What you need is a bright colour with depth that won’t look washed out or too dark… Ha ha Ha. I think you are right, you may need to move into the berry range rather than purple.

    showing my home love thanked liasch
  • houssaon
    5 months ago
    last modified: 5 months ago

    Here are some other options. They are all good for exterior, which is hard to find in the berry family. BM Summer Plum, Vintage Claret, and Berry Fizz, unfortunately are not recommended for exterior.







    showing my home love thanked houssaon
  • RedRyder
    5 months ago

    Would Sherman Williams colors be in the mix? Or does your painter only use BM?

  • showing my home love
    Original Author
    5 months ago
    last modified: 5 months ago

    Thanks for the mockups! Seeing the Carter Plum looks great in that pic but I bought a sample and put it on the door and it looks too dark (if you scroll up, I posted that photo about 10 messages up). This is actually very helpful so I have an idea of how much I need to tweak. I'm thinking 2 shades lighter of either Carter Plum or Jester?

    Painter uses only Sherwin Williams. However I only have BM color deck. But I give him the Bejamin Moore paint name and he has the store color match it, which costs extra at the store. So it gets pretty costly when I have him purchase the color & paint and then change my mind.

    I forgot to answer this, but the front of my house faces West. I'm not sure what that means for lighting.

    Cranberry Cocktail looks like it could be a contender as well.

  • showing my home love
    Original Author
    5 months ago

    @katinparadise I actually took out my color deck and picked a color that I like without looking at the color name (am I the only one that has a bad habit of focusing on the name??) and ended up picking Vintage Claret. So it was interesting seeing your post as well.

    I also want to keep in mind the best RESALE colors since I heard how the front door is the most important color. Google is all over the place with that info so think I will have to check with realtors?

  • PRO
    Flo Mangan
    5 months ago

    When you go lighter in those colors, you will loose the color. Most will go pink. Just depends on what Hue Family they are in. You are better off just picking color. Forget looking at names of colors. Worthless and just “marketing” names. Stick with proper Hue family. With West facing front pitch you get that late summer afternoon light, right? Watch out you don’t go into the Orange Hue Family. I will look up Hue Family for Vintage Claret, Cranberry Cocktail, Carter Plum, and Bordeaux Red. Bbl

    showing my home love thanked Flo Mangan
  • showing my home love
    Original Author
    5 months ago

    @Flo Mangan, yes it does get the mid-late afternoon sun. And you're right paint color names are just marketing. I would love to have that job. Farrow & Ball have a paint color named "Dead Salmon". WHY???

    Btw, hope the hurricane didn't affect you much (or anyone else that was in its path).

  • PRO
    Flo Mangan
    5 months ago

    Thanks for your kind Hurricane thoughts. We escaped with no impact at all. But the folks in Lake Charles, Louisiana are in serious trouble. There is no public water or electricity and it will be weeks to months to restore. Huge restoration teams are already on the ground to help get things semi operational. The death toll was really small, except for those affected, given a Category 4 level storm. I heard today the damage runs from the coast up Louisiana for 400+ miles! This state is lower density than Texas so a bit easier to recover. But if you lost your home, it’s huge. Praying for all their safety and especially power restoration since it is very hit here and we need our air conditioning! If anyone wants to help, Samaritan’s Purse is already on the ground with teams to help. A donation to them would go a long way. Any help anyone can give through your favorite charity will be deeply appreciated. Thanks.

  • PRO
    Flo Mangan
    5 months ago

    Well, I posted my research on the colors you are looking at for the front door and somehow it posted to another thread! I'll try again, but in summary, I still like Impulsive Purple for your front door. It is the best "mix" with your siding and trim colors. The others are all going to go pink on you if you lighten. I'll try moving my detailed comments or reentering them tomorrow. sorry about that.

  • PRO
    Flo Mangan
    5 months ago

    OK, I have checked the 5 colors we are looking at, 4 of your newest and my Impulsive Purple. The most reflective color was Vintage Claret at 14; it is in the warm Red/Purple Hue family so if lightened it will go pink/lavender. Next best from an LRV point of view is Impulsive Purple at 12. It is in the warm Purple Hue family. Lightening it will make it go lavender. Next is Carter Plum at LRV 11. It is in the Red/Purple Hue family and lightened likely will get muddy due to the large amount of Chroma (think graying) in this color. Next Cranberry Cocktail at 10 LRV is solidly in the col Red Hue family. I would eliminate this color. On to Bordeaux Red at 10 LRV. It is in the warm Red Hue family and will go pink if lightened with white. So I am sticking with Impulsive Purple as best look with your siding and with trim color as well as West exposure. Any color will tend to be a little bit darker under your porch unless you lighten the ceiling of your porch. (had some energy, so since this was fresh on my mind, I reentered it. I couldn't figure out how to simply move it.

  • PRO
    Flo Mangan
    5 months ago

    As to best color for resale, red is generally a big one. But with your unique home and since you have a good start on a Victorian style paint job, you must stay focused on that color palette. Don't stray off now. Too late to worry about resale. Finish your repairs and exterior work, to maximize your value added for resale. Do fix porch and stairs and add some nice landscaping that suits the home. White hydrangeas along that porch lattice would be charming. In today's market, The Internet photos are everything. If a house doesn't catch a persons eye on line, in 6 seconds or less, it is passed over. So take pictures yourself, and examine them with a critical eye. Sometimes you see things in photos you skim over in real life and don't see because you are used to them being there. All those details matter. Try to time your listing for a part of the year where most sales occur. Generally speaking that is in the Spring March/April/May so folks can get into houses before the school year starts. Takes 4-6 weeks to close these days, so factor that into your "timing". I believe your style home and location are what will sell your home, but not sense taking money off the table because you didn't take care of items that need repair or changing before any listing occurs.

  • houssaon
    5 months ago

    Since you are going to paint you can get BM. I've looked at SW and just can't find what I like, but I might be biased since I only use BM.

    I used the BM visualizer tool for a door with black windows to try to get a better idea of what it would look like. The trim is Ancient Ivory; don't know what the siding is.

    Since you are looking for a light and bright color, why not gold?

    Ultra Violet reminds me of Jester, but lighter.


  • Anna (6B/7A in MD)
    5 months ago

    ^^ those look like good options. A gold color is used in the inspiration picture, as well.

  • showing my home love
    Original Author
    5 months ago

    Flo, glad to hear you were not impacted. The news is devastating. My thoughts are with those this affected.

    Thanks for explaining the LRV of those colors. I agree the porch will be next on the list after the door and I do love the look of hydrangeas. Once porch is done (the sill likely needs to be replaced), I will work on landscaping. It's actually the one thing I'm looking forward to. 😁

  • showing my home love
    Original Author
    5 months ago

    You wrote:

    "Too late to worry about resale."

    Are you saying I picked the wrong color for the house for resale? The whole point of picking colors was FOR resale so would like to get back in that lane again.

    Is that possible?


  • PRO
    Flo Mangan
    5 months ago

    If you recall, I explained the reason I suggested going White was for RESALE. The strategy behind “staging for resale” is to eliminate as many reasons as possible a potential buyer goes away or reduces their offer amount. You want two things. The buyer to not pass by your listing on line and come see your home. It is often very hard for owners to understand they are not doing things for their taste but to keep buyer pool as wide as possible. Second, to eliminate as many potential excuses a buyer might use to reduce their offer price. I think you are more tied to this home than you realized earlier. You picked this sage green color because it pleased you. So you are where you are. The color combo is ok but you started at end not beginning. I mentioned several times that certain things needed to be done BEFORE painting. Insulation and porch repairs first. The reason being those things affect a good paint job. So, the track now that would benefit you most is fixing porch and painting porch and stairs. Don’t ver off to additional extras. Focus on front of home. I think getting that right is Priority One. Your agent can photo that and describe home as a “diamond” that is ready for the buyer’s touch to make it their own. Understand that RIGHT NOW potential buyers are driving by watching and waiting. The new color is not bad, but it gives buyers a reason to reduce their offer price. To “get back in the resale lane” as you put it, means you have to change your mentality. This isn’t your house anymore. It is a buyers home. I am not trying to be mean, just trying to help you as you move forward. Put your “buyer” hat on. Take photos and think like you were buying this house. That will help you a lot. One of the first things I would do is remove those old hedges and plan out a new landscaping for front view. Get preliminary things done as budget allows. This is messy work. Best done before painting anything else. Next, fix the simple things on porch. I suspect there are foundation repairs needed but that will open another box of worms. Think resale. Cosmetics unless there is true significant issue. The buyer already knows this home is old and will need repairs. Think like they would. See what I mean? The front door right now should not be a focus. A buyer is going to paint it the color they envision on this house. Ask yourself, thinking like you were buying, is the condition of the porch or the color of the front door more important. Hope you immediately figured out, it’s the condition of the front porch. If not, you haven’t become a buyer in your head. Be a buyer.

  • showing my home love
    Original Author
    5 months ago

    As I mentioned before, I am waiting to hear back on porch repair estimates and they are booked so it likely will not be done until next year. I can't speed that up any faster which is why I want to paint the door while I wait. Since they will likely need to replace the porch sill, I will need to wait to landscape since they will be trampling all over the new flowers if I did it now. Then the porch can be fixed and painted at the same time.

    My first color choice was BM Fieldstone but an expert designer I met with recommended BM Saybrook Sage after I told her what I was looking for (initially, that was quick resale).

    So I totally get what you're saying but since the porch is in the hands of the contractor's schedule, I wanted to do something else until then.

    Also my house was insulated on the 3 sides that were painted. The only side not insulated is the one side that will be painted next year.

    Hope this makes sense. As far as the comment "too late to worry about resale", did I completely screw that up with the body color choice? I'm so confused...


  • ljptwt7
    5 months ago

    In my totally nonprofessional opinion I don't think you made a mistake. Your house will be beautiful when done. I think a color much nicer than white and you picked a non offensive color. There may be some who disagree but I doubt you hurt resale value by using the sage color. Good luck to you....you did comment you may not even sell. If this is still a possibility I'm glad you chose something YOU like!

    showing my home love thanked ljptwt7
  • PRO
    Flo Mangan
    5 months ago

    Ok. I understand. A color consultant is not a resale specialist. But no need looking backwards. Get more estimates for porch. Keep cosmetic repairs in mind. No rebuild. Having owned a home built in 1900, I can tell you stories!! Basically everything you touch becomes 3 times worse than at first glance. But we bought with the need for 6-7 bedrooms! And not much money. So you will get there. No regrets no worries. Someone is already eyeing your home especially if the location is desirable which you noted.

    showing my home love thanked Flo Mangan
  • Anna (6B/7A in MD)
    5 months ago

    Don't regret your color choice, it's beautiful and the home already looks amazing and I can guarantee you that folks are eyeing up your place.

    showing my home love thanked Anna (6B/7A in MD)
  • sydneyfv
    5 months ago

    I agree that your house looks beautiful. I probably wouldn’t even repaint the door at this point, but I know you don’t like it. You will get the rest done in time and sell when you decide the season is right.

    showing my home love thanked sydneyfv
  • PRO
    Design Interior South
    5 months ago
    last modified: 5 months ago

    I think Flo and I have tried to stress from the beginning that the painting was the last thing that needed to be done. When you do things out of order you are paying for things twice essentially. Like Flo we aren't saying any of this to be mean. We speak from experience. Example when they repair your porch the chances that the new paint on your home will have to be redone in certain areas is very likely. The chances that your new paint wont match up with what is in the can from being on the home for a few months is also very likely. So when I say pay twice this is what I mean, Pay to have the home painted before the repairs is simply putting the cart before the horse.

    As far as color we both recommended white because it is clean and eye catching and doesn't form an immediate negative opinion. For instance a buyer who doesn't like green may not even look at the listing because they see a green home. That will be their immediate impression and it may stop them from even entering the home or making an appt with their realtor to view the home. Will there be people who love sage green homes? Sure but you've immediately made your pool smaller.

    What you don't want people to see when the time comes for you to actually list the home is that you've spent a lot of time and money on things that buyers are going to ask to be repaired or inspection reports flag. An example is your front door. I would be more worried about repairing the door by planing it and filling in the poor surface with resins to bring back the smooth surface on it before painting it than the actual paint color. Old homes are wonderful, but there are only so many things you can pass off as "its because its an old home" to perspective buyers. These things are viewed as maintenance that they are going to have to do. That will be money out of your pocket.

    But really I think you likely have too much info being thrown at you from all directions. You've paid for professional help but all the while are asking for more opinions. Thats what I call analysis paralysis. I think stepping back and taking a break is sometimes the best thing we can do to gain perspective on what needs to be done.

    showing my home love thanked Design Interior South
  • showing my home love
    Original Author
    5 months ago
    last modified: 5 months ago

    Appreciate all the comments, I really do. I understand all white sells a house fast according to comments here, but surely there are other colors close in line after white. That was what I was aiming for with the BM Saybrook Sage but sounds like I may have missed the mark according to the pros here.

    The house absolutely needed to be painted since the lead paint would flake off during every wind and rain storm. There were many bare pieces of wood that were getting more and more damaged after every rain and snow storm. Only the porch sill plate needs to be replaced for structural needs and the porch contractor came here while the painter was here and the only repaint needed to the house would be behind the gutter where he will need to jack-up the porch. So I disagree that painting the house first was a mistake.

    I did contact an expert designer that someone recommended here. She gave color names and didn't explain why in many cases. Also she had me running around in 90 degree weather taking pictures of neighbor's houses while we were on a call (charged by the hour), when she could have asked me to provide that beforehand. I told her I'm interested in resale as priority and second to highlight the character of the Victorian home. I told her the color I liked and she said no it looks too muddy. First she recommended Stratton Blue, which we ended up not liking, and that's how we landed on Saybrook Sage. Do I even like Saybrook Sage? Honestly, it's ok but she's a pro so at least she should be able to get the body color right, I thought. By then the painter needed the paint color the next day so I just went with it. She didn't have me feeling 100% because she was very dismissive of my realtors comments and said "oh your realtor doesn't know what she's talking about!" which is why I came here for additional feedback on detail and door color because while I PAID her a decent amount to do the virtual consult, she did not explain things well. She also had no idea what a bulkhead leading to a cellar was. I wasn't 100% sold on her advice nor her experience, especially with Victorian homes. Plus, she never once asked me what *I* liked or my thoughts. It was not the best experience which again is why I came here.

    Then I met with @Old House Guy LLC who I believe @Anna (6B/7A in MD) sent me the link for which honestly I wish I met with first. While it was a quick meeting to go over the mock-ups by @houssaon. He explained certain gables should be painted and WHY which is what was in the mock-up - thanks Houssaon! He also explained how the crown molding should be painted and also WHY. He wasn't just throwing colors at me like others but gave me a better understanding on why certain areas should and should not be painted, which I truly appreciate. At this point, Saybrook Sage was already on this house so I had to keep moving along with that. I will follow his suggestions for the crown molding lines next year when the painter comes back. Btw, if you or anyone are looking to paint a Victorian house, I HIGHLY recommended him.

    I truly appreciate everyone's feedback and comments and the support you provided me throughout this journey. It's quite disconcerting to hear from the pros that it's too late to worry about resale with the BM Saybrook Sage when that's what I was aiming for in the beginning.

  • akrrm (Nancy in NJ 7a)
    5 months ago

    I think your house looks beautiful.

    showing my home love thanked akrrm (Nancy in NJ 7a)
  • liasch
    5 months ago

    Personally I have agreed with your decisions all the way along the line. The house looks infinitely more attractive and has more curb appeal in the sage green which is actually a fairly neutral color. I think if a buyer was looking at white with the idea of repainting it, that in itself would be a stumbling block. Repainting the house is an expensive proposition. The fact that your home is going to look good right off the bat is a selling point in my view. And I think it looks fantastic. The door is an easy fix; just to please yourself. Go for it! And if the colour doesn’t work, hey it’s just a can of paint… So don’t sweat the small stuff. Ha ha Ha.

    As far as the planting out front goes, hydrangeas are nice but there’s a lot of other things that have more year-round interest. I have a golden leaf spirea in the front of my place that comes out with purple pink flowers and it makes a gorgeous hedge. Super easy to look after and the golden colours of the leaves look great and the pink purple would be nice against the house.

    You aren’t going to have any problems selling your place, just look at all the other houses on your street most of which are not white. You’ve put a lot of time and thought into these decisions so don’t start fretting that you’ve made the wrong choice.

    Your actual resale is not for a while yet. In the meantime do the things that are easy and inexpensive to do so that you can enjoy your last year or two in your fixed up old dolly. If someone else pointed out, an old house is never done. As my brother said about his place, it’s like the Golden gate Bridge. You start painting at one end and then when you get to the other end, you start all over again painting at the beginning.

    showing my home love thanked liasch
  • liasch
    5 months ago

    For future reference, here is the spirea. Of course there’s a lot of really nice plants that are inexpensive that you could use to do the front and sides; hydrangeas, spirea, eonymous...Can you tell I’m a gardener? When you go to landscape you might want to start another thread.

    Anyway just to reinforce what I said above... I love your house and the way it’s progressing… Great job!

    showing my home love thanked liasch
  • Hutchae84 Zone 8b/PNW
    5 months ago

    I read through this and just wanted to say OP...breath...the color is fine. The house is a light green, it is non offensive and goes well. I'm not an expert by any means but it was earlier discussed that gray is trending out but it is also a classic color. White is also very classic but also currently trendy and could also be considered on its way "out" in a couple of years when OP is ready to sell. Green is also a classic color and to some it can appear dated because it was very popular in the 90s but it is also trending big time again.

    Keep in mind what will sell your home is the location, the style of your home and the general repair of it. My husband has been in real estate for decades and his least two favorite colors are green and red...and the first house he ever bought was a green house with a red door and he owned it for 10 years and kept it those same colors. You did not paint your house neon orange, it is light green, your buyer pool is still quite large.

    I personally love a white house and our neighbor painted her victorian house white (I think it looks quite nice) but so many people comment on how much they dislike that color on her house. You can't please everyone even if you think you're picking the "right" color to appeal to the masses.

  • RedRyder
    5 months ago

    I also love your house and agree that a newly painted house will sell. There are other reasons houses do or do not sell (location, bedrooms, bathrooms, overall condition, school system, internal layout, etc.). Your house is adorable and looks loved, which is important. The colors chosen are soft, not jarring, and most people will like them. You are not IMMINENTLY putting it on the market, hence going with colors that make you happy. The door color is getting tricky due to the lack of light there, but you’ll figure it out. I hope you don’t start losing sleep over this because you’ve done a great job on an unusual house. We all make u-turns during different projects. Yours aren’t too bad!

    As for landscaping, I agree a new thread will attract the group that loves that topic. I love spirea as well and have a Candy Corn version. The leaves get the color of the candy (literally) and go red in the winter. The flowers are the same as liasch’s, but lighter and more violet than deep pink.

  • mrykbee
    5 months ago

    People in the south don’t realize a White House usually looks terrible in a snowy winter. I’m in MA too. If you’re in eastern Mass the markets are so hot right you’ll have no trouble selling. Your blue door going purple will not get you more offers— you’ll have multiple regardless. I’d fix the steps and any rotten floorboards on the porch and make the entrance really pretty with up lighting, rockers, plants, and list it. Also, if you love that house down the street with berry (I suggested this at the beginning of your thread with a bad Zillow picture), just knock on the door and ask them what it is.

  • PRO
    Lori A. Sawaya
    5 months ago

    This is his site: https://www.oldhouseguy.com/accenting-victorian-house-colors/ Have any of you worked with him?


    Yes. Ken is Color Strategist in addition to being an expert on all things old houses. I've personally referred him.


    Couple things. I'd never use semi-gloss exterior. Top tier satin finish is plenty durable.


    Whether a color is prone to fading depends on the pigment. Inorganic is more stable than organic.


    Don't assume color fastness based on hue, always ask the paint store pro about the color fastness of the exterior color you're considering.


    As many of you know I absolutely do not get into colorants. However, it's possible to get a color like Saybrook Sage with inorganic pigments that aren't green.


    Which is why it's a good idea to ask.

  • liasch
    5 months ago

    Nice ideas on staging the porch. Flowers and a couple of rockers

  • Jennifer Hogan
    5 months ago
    last modified: 5 months ago

    @showing my home love

    I have read through your comments and some of the additional comments. I worked for a real-estate attorney with the evaluation of property values and then as a real estate agent.

    1. You were correct in the decision to paint your home - the lead paint was peeling and chipping - requires painting.

    2. White happens to be a popular color at the moment, but I believe you made the right decision to paint the home sage. The color will allow you to have white trim and give you the contrast that makes your home interesting.

    3. Sage Green is a color that many people like. It is seldom seen as an offsetting color or a negative color.

    4. I would not paint the front door purple. It happens to be my favorite color, but I am in the minority - many people dislike purple. I would probably choose a front door color with broader appeal.

    This would be my suggested colors: Bold - Benjamin Moore Coat of Arms, Less Bold - Benjamin Moore Everard Blue





    Select a less bold color if your door isn't what you want them to notice and remember - Bold only if your front door is is perfect condition.

    These colors will have a much greater universal appeal than purple.

    When looking for resale value you don't want to overspend on renovations, but you must make everything look well cared for. Remove or trim back overgrown bushes and fill in with annuals when it is time to sell. Mulch all the beds. Buying expensive perennials will cost you more than they will return.

    When I am doing renovations I assume a 50% return on my investment. Whatever I am doing is going to have to bring me the other 50% of the cost through enjoying my space.

    If you are going to be there 3 years do whatever is needed to spruce things up, but know that 50% of what you spend is being gifted to the next owner and is that much less that you will have to spend on your next home.

    Your home will be valued based on the neighborhood, the square footage and overall condition of your home.

    It will sell if it is priced correctly given the 3 parameters above.

    To know how to price your home visit every home that goes on the market that is in your neighborhood/school district. Are they bigger than yours - reduce the price. Are they nicer than yours - reduce the price. Did they sell fast or sit on the market - if they sat they were over priced. Did they sell at or close to the listing price?

    Educate yourself on what is going on in your area and price your home right. Don't trust the realtors to give you the right information. They want your listing and will often tell you an unrealistic price because they know that listing your house and advertising your house will make buyers call. The buyers who call will likely buy a different home, but if they can hook the buyer with your house and sell them something else they still make a commission.

    This gets your hopes up - thinking you are going to get a higher price for your home, but if you price your home too high and it sits on the market and you will be forced to lower your price. Once a house is seen as stale the price people are willing to spend goes down. You usually end up with low ball offers from people who assume you are getting desperate.

    Hope this helps you with the decision making process.

  • RedRyder
    5 months ago

    Any progress on the door? We all are waiting to see your decision.

  • liasch
    5 months ago

    Jennifer that is all such great advice! I wish I could copy and paste it for when my son goes to sell his house. Meanwhile the turquoise door colour is a really nice choice that hasn’t been suggested before now. I am liking it.

  • RedRyder
    5 months ago

    @Liasch - you can send the whole dilemma to your son and tell him to look for Jennifer’s comments (all of which have been very, very helpful).

  • dsimber
    5 months ago
    last modified: 5 months ago

    liasch--You CAN copy and paste into Word or a google doc! then save in a “Renovations and Resale” folder. 😉


    My vote for door color would be for the "Less Bold - Benjamin Moore Everard Blue.”

  • liasch
    5 months ago

    Actually I’m on an iPad and I can’t copy and paste from the app. Yet another software glitch from our friends here at Houzz. What I did do was to take a screenshot.

  • dsimber
    5 months ago

    That should work!

  • Jennifer Hogan
    5 months ago

    Glad to share a little of what I have learned over the years - it is one of the blessings of getting older.

  • Brad P
    5 months ago

    I read this entire post and boy what a train wreck. OP expressed concerns the blue was too dark before it was painted and was ignored. I said it was wrong blue but was outnumbered. Now this poor lad has to spend more money to repaint. House going up for sale and a Pro here suggests a bright purple door? After OP said neighbor has purple door and doesnt like purple? Smh

    Best detailed advice here is from Jennifer Hogan. Shame OP didn't get it before the start of the project.

    Sorry to say but the old historic house advice on this site is bloody awful.