claireplymouth

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2020 #4

claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
10 days ago
last modified: 10 days ago

This thread is intended to give people a place to post photos and/or talk about birds, critters, wildlife, fish, whatever - topics you might not want to start a whole thread on, but are still garden-related. You can see the range of possible topics in the previous threads:

INDEX to threads 2008 to 2011

For 2012, see the links posted in
RE RE: Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2012 #7. There may be problems with some of the links. I've corrected those I can edit.

2013 threads: 
INDEX: Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2013
2014 threads:
INDEX: Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2014

2015 threads: Links for #1 through #10 are included in

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2015 #11

2016 threads: Links for #1 through #9 are included in

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2016 #10

2017 threads: Links for #1 through #6 are included i

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2017 #6

2018 threads:
Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2018 #1

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2018 #2

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2018 #3

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2018 #4

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2018 #5

2019 threads:

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2019 #1

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2019 #2

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2019 #3

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2019 #4

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2019 #5

2020 threads:

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2020 #1

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2020#2

Birds and other mobile features in the garden 2020#3

..............................................................................................................................................

I looked out the kitchen window today and thought I saw a squirrel on one bird feeder, noshing while comfortably perched on the seed dish.



I guess I was wrong, at least according to the squirrel who thought it was hidden by the big bushy tail.



I could almost hear the squirrel saying "She can't see me under the tail so if I keep it up I can eat all I want for as long as I want."





I guess it worked because I didn't run out and yell at the squirrel (not that I would have - I gave up that fight a long time ago).

Claire

Comments (44)

  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    Original Author
    4 days ago
    last modified: 4 days ago

    I haven't been seeing turkey poults this year and very few turkeys in general. Two days ago I saw a hen with three poults trotting through the yard, too suddenly for me to get my camera.

    This morning there were two hens and at least two poults feeding under the tube feeders. It's a tight space and hard to see clearly.




    I've missed them.

    Claire

    Best Answer
  • corunum z6 CT
    8 days ago

    There's no place to click LIKE on your post, Claire, - but I like it. Interesting that we're having similar experiences and responses.


    First glance outside my window this morning, I saw him. After a lifetime of looking at nature and wondering how and why this unparalleled phenomenon called life exists at all, my initial response when looking at this chap was culturally human: “Damn! He made it”. However, my instinct grabbed the camera.


    As I walked toward him he naturally scampered down and ran up the birch tree, but only about four feet up as he stopped and watched me. He was probably gauging whether he had to make a complete run for it or would the zoo keeper suddenly turn back and save him from climbing higher. I stopped to have a chat and he held his attention on me, eye-to-eye. Instead of yelling at him, I congratulated him on his hard-won victory. He’s young, no longer this year’s teenager, I’d put him at about 21 in human terms. Lean and muscular, his challenge at this moment, is this tube of safflower seeds. In his short lifetime, he has tried for so long to conquer it, that this morning, he finally made it. His victory made me think about all the times I tried so hard to win a battle in life, to pull sick people and animals through, to escape angry people, to keep a roof over my head, and so far, I, too, have made it – with not every battle won, but each one fought as hard as possible. All this reflection from a squirrel at the feeder? Yup. I figure if we watch enough of life outside our window, with luck, we’ll come to realize that recording an event with kindness beats yelling.

    Funny thing is, when I came back into my office, this song was playing.

    Yup, he made it.

    Jane


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  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    8 days ago

    I'll bet someone here might have a suggestion to make. We are having a banner year with wildlife. Lots of rabbits, some moles, something that is digging up things in the night. Today my DH was ripping out old growth in a raised veggie bed and came across what he thought was some kind of animal burrow in the bed. I came out to look and having seen someone's photo of a rabbit living in their raised bed, that is what I think it is. He didn't uncover it enough to actually see and identify the baby rabbits, but you can see something moving in the hole. Very shallowly dug and there is a lot of fuzzy material around it, like a rabbit shedding.


    Unfortunately, not a lot is still standing in that bed. I'm concerned that we have disturbed it too much. That there is not enough growing material around it to disguise the comings and goings of the burrow, or to shade it. I wonder if there is anything we can do to make amends? I don't have any plants I can plant there. I wasn't going to replant it, I wanted to empty my compost bin onto the bed and keep piling up garden debris as a sheet composting effort. I have one potted Baptisia in a gallon pot that I thought I could move along side the bed to be somewhat of a disguise. Otherwise, I wonder if the mother rabbit will try to move the babies?

  • corunum z6 CT
    8 days ago

    PM2 - here's a link that may help:Rabbit care

    Not seeing the area makes a suggestion difficult, but covering the hole seems critical to their survival. Do you have a potted plant(s) that could help shade it? An umbrella to keep the sun out? Cover the area with compost, branches, something to keep them safe during this horrific heat and sun. A water saucer nearby on the ground for the Mom? The link above is all I have. Good of you to try and make their life happen. Poster bunnies, lol.


    Jane

  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    8 days ago

    Okay, thanks for the link. It is a veggie bed so it's sunny but by 2pm it starts to get shady there. I will go out and arrange a couple of pots to give the area some shade. It is really hot. We do have about 4 bird baths and we're refilling them a couple of times a day. They're in the shade at least half the day. And two are on low rocks on the ground so lots of animals seem to use them. I've never seen the rabbits use them, but I assume they do. It's about 15ft away from the bed..


    I've never seen so many rabbits! This is the 3rd generation of baby bunnies in the yard this year.


  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    8 days ago
    last modified: 8 days ago

    Okay, well I did what I could. I went out and moved the potted baptisia but it was pretty thin and not making much shade. I was planning on pruning back a shrub so I cut off some of those branches and tried sticking them in the ground around it, wasn't much help either, so I finally decided to try an umbrella. Which did the trick. A large blue umbrella laid on the ground shading where the entry is. I just hope that doesn't scare away the mother rabbit. I'm going to try to stay away from them at this point and just keep my fingers crossed. I was thinking of putting the sprinkler on all the beds, but maybe that's not a great idea.

  • corunum z6 CT
    8 days ago

    PM, If you've done all that you can do, then let it be and let nature take her wild and crazy way. This person had a similar happening, introduced foreign materials, and the kits lived. Hope for the best. 😊Texas rabbit nest

  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    8 days ago

    Well, that was a pretty smart solution. So it did work out. I could rig up something similar instead of the umbrella. I don't have one of those plastic bins but I have a plastic milk crate that might work as well and I have plenty of cement blocks. I think. But, go back and fool with it again or not? I used nitrile gloves the last time so I wouldn't get any scent on the area. I may just go take a photo of the dumb arrangement with the umbrella and post it.



  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    Original Author
    8 days ago
    last modified: 8 days ago

    Wow, a lot happened while I was out watering the wilting garden!

    Those are great links, Jane, with lots of helpful information.

    Good job, PM2 - sounds like the babies have a real chance of survival.

    Claire

  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    8 days ago
    last modified: 8 days ago

    Here's the pretty inadequate arrangement. I still think maybe I should try something else...

    The nest is to the right of the pot about where the handle of the umbrella is positioned. They definitely have shade and we don 't have any dogs, cats, or kids, in a fenced in backyard. My only concern is how the mother is going to react to the umbrella. Or if the pot is going to be in her way trying to get into the nest.


  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    Original Author
    8 days ago

    It looks like it might work, but it's pretty open to predators. You probably have a short window to do something else before night falls and the mother rabbit comes back.

    The milk crate and cement blocks might give better protection.

    Your call.

    Claire

  • corunum z6 CT
    8 days ago

    PM2 - Ah, a proud moment for Prudential. 😊 It's anybody's guess at this point whether it will work or not, but I applaud you for trying. The umbrella might put predators off - hopefully. If the mother's maternal instinct outweighs her fear of the new surroundings, they'll make it. Wouldn't the milk crate still need shading? Sharing kindness under an umbrella works. Keep us apprised, if you will.

    Jane

  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    8 days ago
    last modified: 8 days ago

    Jane, I can't believe you noticed the Prudential logo...lol. Eagle eye! :-). Now that's quite a picture. Glad I don't have baby cows to accommodate. [g]

    Well, we just redid the whole thing. The umbrella blew off. [g] We figured if it worked for the person who posted it, why not? So we found just about the same thing she used and tried to duplicate what she did. I left the branches from my pruning. It's really a shame we didn't notice the nest before we pulled a whole lot of cilantro that was in that little corner where she dug her nest. And we just had yard waste pick up, so I am short on material to disguise it.

    We had to angle the plastic bin, upside down and the patio paver would shade it just fine. We really don't have anything growing in the vegetable garden right now, so we can stay clear away from it. The only time we need to go in the back is to refill the bird baths for a few days. And we can see that corner from our kitchen window. So, that's that. Thank you for all the help, those links were really helpful!!



  • corunum z6 CT
    8 days ago

    Great job, PM2!



  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    Original Author
    8 days ago

    Much better, PM2! It's a very sensible setup and any decent, self-respecting, mother rabbit should welcome it.

    Now to wait for her to come back and check out the babies.

    Claire

  • corunum z6 CT
    7 days ago

    Yesterday morning I congratulated the squirrel on his victory. This morning, uh...not so much. Humans are fickle. As I carried the tube feeder away to be cleaned and put back some other day, I wondered if the mourning doves who sit in the feeder tray all day, were hanging from branches blaming the young agile squirrel for ruining their buffet. Probably not. I'm listening to Diane Ackerman's book, "Dawn Light" via hoopla, and it's nice to hear other people wonder about the same things. Can't get the shepherd's crook back into the ground without a sledge hammer and a divining rod! - roots and rocks - so the doves will just have to be peacefully patient and accept the fact that the activity of one, greatly affected all the others. Nothing new in that observation.



    Jane

  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    7 days ago

    Haven't seen any activity over by the bunny nest. We can only see it standing at the sink, so it's not like we are sitting watching it. I guess we may not know anything unless we start to see babies in the yard.

  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    Question for those taking lots of wildlife photos - Not that I have a ton of wildlife to take photos of, but, I don't even make the attempt to even take photos of the birds we do have. I have a good camera but I basically use it to point and shoot. I don't like taking photos of anything that moves. [g]. Too fast for me. But - I find some members of my family are more interested in the wildlife than the plants and I thought, maybe I should at least try it.

    So, just exploring the idea, wondering what it would take to do a decent job of photographing wildlife. Is it the lens, is it technique or is it the way you set up your yard so you can get close to your subjects without alerting them? Or a combination of all three? Was it hard to get better at it?

    I remember Deanne from NH used to take some amazing bird photos, but she also built a blind in her backyard. [g]

  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    Original Author
    6 days ago

    PM2: Jane is much better qualified to answer your question, but I'll make a few comments. I have an old Canon camera with a reasonably good zoom lens that I use as a point and shoot.

    I think the most important thing for me is that my yard is set up so I can watch most everything from a window - primarily the kitchen window. I don't usually try to photograph any wildlife while I'm outside except maybe some insects on a plant. The zoom lens is fine from the window and doesn't disturb them too much, although they can see me watching.

    I just keep photographing, knowing that most of the photos won't be particularly good but sometimes I will luck out. Practice helps.

    Claire


  • corunum z6 CT
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    PM2 & Claire - No, Jane is not better qualified to answer, but I will give my honest reaction to your major question, PM2. PM2 wrote: "I don't like taking photos of anything that moves." Then don't do it. "I find some members of my family are more interested in the wildlife than the plants and I thought, maybe I should at least try it." Why? If wildlife is their thing, let them take photos. I'm sure this sounds harsh, but, Good Person that you are PM2, you already own everything it takes to shoot wildlife in your yard, local park, shore. What I don't read in your post is any innate interest or passion for taking up this hobby. That's what we do: It's a hobby. And, a hobby without love and passion is really just a job.

    I've always liked Nature and like learning about why life exists - at all. Photographing an unfolding fern or the center of a flower and seeing its spiral whorls begets learning about the Fibonacci Sequence. For me, photography is a method that helps me connect some dots. It's a lifelong learning passion. I only do it for my heart. Your pictures of your flowers are lovely and you know a lot about them! Hats off to you. But, unless your heart steers you in the direction of photographing walking and flying things, be pleased that you have such lovely gardens and give a subscription to National Geographic or Wildlife magazine for Christmas to those family members who want to see feathers and fur.

    Jane (who is not known for beating around the bush)😂


    P.S. Probably is overkill, but for those who are Covid-19 imprisoned in this heat, and may be interested in spirals -- Inner Worlds Outer Worlds, Part II

  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    Original Author
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    PM2: Jane has a lot of good points that could be an excuse for not trying to photograph wildlife. However, and there's always a however, you have expressed a desire to at least try it.

    So do it. Give it a try and it may grow on you, or maybe not. Passions can develop unexpectedly and can give you enormous pleasure. What do you have to lose? Nobody expects you to suddenly turn out professional level photographs but you could get some decent ones that your family members will appreciate. And the more you look, the more you see that you didn't even notice before.

    And you need to be ready to photograph the baby bunnies.

    Claire

  • corunum z6 CT
    6 days ago

    Hahahaha, Way to go, Claire! No, PM2, we did not coordinate these '2 sides of the same coin' answers in the back room. No matter what, it's up to you to try with your present camera. I fully agree with Claire, you have nothing to lose. There are plenty of Youtube videos to give you hints should you want them. Point and Shoot! You don't like motion, so try taking a bird sitting still on a branch or bird bath and go from there. If you like it, great! And if you don't, so what? Delete.

    The beauty of digital. Best to you. 😊


    Jane

  • corunum z6 CT
    6 days ago

    Good, PM2, I'm glad you will have a go at it when the mood and opportunity strikes. I just walked out to the postbox with camera in hand, and found these little spirits (below) doing their thing slowly on coneflowers. Unlike you, I do not have family anymore - they're all in Spirit. So, other than on Claire's thread, an occasional email to my neighbor and infrequently on Facebook, I have nowhere else to share my photos. And yes, a good 90% get tossed. I did create a folder titled, "Day Late Buck Short" for all the funny misses and strange things that the camera catches. Also, for what it may be worth, I keep the date on my Canon P&S. I find it helps track flower blooming and baby bird progression and, when just beginning, you'd be able to track your progress - just an idea.


    I find the trouble with online post discussions is the delayed timing, lack of visible emotion and voice inflection. Had this discussion taken place over coffee with the three of us, it would have been a few minutes of chat all wrapped up before lunch. 😊



    Jane

  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    6 days ago

    Jane, I agree with you, online discussions have always been problematic for the reasons you point out. Oh for the days of chats over coffee at the kitchen table. :-)

    I’m sorry that all your family are in Spirit now. You’re right, I’m very lucky to still have family. I have lost a lot of family too, and I have found it very hard, so I can definitely understand to some degree where you are coming from. I should hope that if all my family were lost to me, I’d still be able to so passionately put myself into the living world around me as you do. :-).

    Great tip on dating the photos as a way of tracking progress. Thanks!

  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    Original Author
    6 days ago

    PM2: There's also the issue of subjects that move, as wildlife often does. And one answer is to take videos. I assume your camera has the capacity. It's not difficult so long as you can hold the camera steady. I've leaned on coffee makers and windowsills and anything available.

    You need to have an account on YouTube (or Vimeo) that you can upload the videos to. Then you just link to the YouTube, etc. account to post on Houzz. Videos can be edited using your camera software. You don't need to add fancy music - most of it just annoys me anyway.

    It sounds like your children are really strong animal people so I can understand why you want to connect with them.

    Claire

  • corunum z6 CT
    6 days ago

    PM2 - RAIN! It's mobile and easy to photograph. I have a folder just for rain - not a bad way to practice. It all moves at the same time and you don't have to do anything but click. It just started to come down moments ago and the sun came right back out. But, the temp dropped from 93° to 84°. 🙏And Claire's right about the video ability on your P&S. I can't do it very well, and I usually forget about video - even when it rains for 1 minute.😊 Shoot anything, well...not any thing.😂



    Jane

  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    Original Author
    5 days ago

    Well, the way the weather's going nowadays it would be easier to shoot Bigfoot than rain.

    Claire, snarling

  • corunum z6 CT
    5 days ago

    A friend to help you snarl... (first thing I saw when I read your sign-off..Lucy!)

    hhehhehee

  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    5 days ago
    last modified: 5 days ago

    Claire - I love your suggestion about video. My camera is a Nikon D5300. I use it as a point and shoot, but it’s capable of a lot more than I do with it. It does have video and that might be a way of getting around the moving subject problem. Good thinking!

    Definitely, think my kids would enjoy more animal content over the exclusive garden content of most of my garden photos. [g]. And video even better. And it is about time I spent some time learning to get more out of my camera.

    Jane - I wish I had rain to take a photo of…lol. Another completely wrong forecast for rain and strong winds and we didn’t see a drop. Really nice that you did. Maybe the next forecast will produce for Claire and I.

  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    5 days ago
    last modified: 5 days ago

    Oh, I forgot - update on the bunnies. I saw a rabbit in the vegetable garden about 4p yesterday. It was an adult and was sitting in one of the raised beds, just not the one with the burrow in it. I sat down and watched it for awhile. It hopped into the pathway, then up into the vegetable bed next to the bed with the burrow. It hopped out in the path right next to the right bed, it seemed to be being careful and looking around. Then it went over to where the burrow was, and while it was still standing in the pathway, put it's front paws on the top edge of the wooden bed, right where the burrow was, but behind the plastic bin covering it, and seemed to be sniffing it.

    That was it! Very disappointing. It never made an attempt to go near the cement block that would have allowed it entry to the burrow. It went back to exploring other parts of the vegetable garden and then went into other garden areas. I'm thinking that is not a good sign. I'm even wondering if it is the mother rabbit.

    So, now I'm wondering if having the cement block could be keeping it from getting into the burrow. I am considering whether to go and remove the block and the bin and getting a better look at where the babies are. I could check to make sure they are okay, but, I suppose, either way, what could we do about it anyway. But maybe if I leave the plastic bin set up for the day until it gets shady and then remove it for dusk and early evening, that would give opportunity for the mom to have better access. Any thoughts?

  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    Original Author
    5 days ago

    That's a tough one, PM2. It could be that the mother rabbit was just checking the babies without going inside since my understanding is that they don't visit the babies during the daytime.

    I would really hesitate to remove the bin which would be a major disruption. If you think the cement block holes are too small for access, maybe you could just slide the block to the side enough to give better access without disturbing the main apparatus.

    Good luck with whatever you decide!

    Claire

  • corunum z6 CT
    5 days ago

    Think I wore houzz out yesterday. Can't post a picture. Later. . .

  • corunum z6 CT
    4 days ago

    It may seem like a tight space, Claire, but I think it's perfect. Pretty sure they do too. Glad they're back to share your space with you. A couple of weeks ago, I had to slow way down hundreds of feet away because there were hens with poults crossing a nearby road. Must have been 50 of them - largest flock I've ever seen. Bobcat is back at my neighbor's a 1/2 mile away; her backyard June-July squirrel population of 12 is down to 5. She witnessed the bobcat's successful hunt, but was kind of sorry she did.


    Winter wrens, who live in the new birdhouse I erected on an outdoor umbrella stand, now help clean worms from various trees and shrubs. They have a bath, then preen outside my window.




    Jane

  • corunum z6 CT
    3 days ago

    A young titmouse plucked a tiny, rolled-up leaf off the cherry tree. Titmouses, wrens, chickadees have been faithful larvae gleaners on the birch, cherry, chokeberry, et al, during this relentless humidity. This little chap watched intently, perhaps for some worm movement inside the leaf, before he chose a very small one. I could see his intention strengthen from the pluck to landing on a branch just outside my window. His fervor over this leaf stoked expressions of high expectation - at least on my part. The result is what I've seen before.





    Yuck


    After watching PBS cooking shows for years, I keep hoping for Martha, Lidia, Jacques Pepin, somebody who tastes what they make just to tell the viewer how good it is - I await the day for one of those chefs to take a bite and wear a face like this titmouse.😂 Julia Child would have.

    Jane

  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    Original Author
    3 days ago

    I'm imagining Julia Child unwrapping a leaf and biting into a caterpillar on television....

    Claire

  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    Original Author
    2 days ago
    last modified: 2 days ago

    I was out in the yard this afternoon doing my usual refilling of the feeders, etc., and I was stopped by a young hen with at least one very small poult. The hen blocked my way, looking as if she was ready to protect her baby (or babies) from me but really really hoped she wouldn't have to. I said the usual reassuring things (it's OK, turkey, I won't hurt your babies) and threw some birdseed on the ground The relieved hen accepted the goodwill gesture and started eating.

    I moved on and the poult(s) probably came back to her. I enjoy hearing the hens clucking to the youngsters to keep them organized.

    This was a different family from the ones I saw yesterday (I think they were here earlier today),

    All of this happened in spite of the noise from a Bobcat (machinery, not cat) operating up the street where a lot was just sold.

    Claire

  • corunum z6 CT
    2 days ago

    With luck, it will be just one house or building, Claire. For 70 years there was a horse farm up the street. The horses went late last year, the barn was razed this Spring, and now 28 houses are to be built on multiple cul de sacs with one entry onto our street on the 37 acre parcel - so I've heard. Nobody but the builder is thrilled. Meanwhile, due to the land clearing, maybe your turkeys will visit more frequently.


    Here, it's the same daily visitors with their variations. Could be me, but I don't recall seeing a male ruby-throated with a gorget as high as a turtleneck. I guess they are, but this one just seemed to be higher. Shot quickly through a dirty garden window, so. . .



    It's a popular place...



    The kids have gotten used to feeding themselves, but now they are in the land of indecision.


    Jane



  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    Original Author
    2 days ago

    That hummer's gorget does seem to be higher than usual. Maybe the gorget is evolving into a mask in case of an avian pandemic. I'd love to have a mask that looks like that.

    The new construction will be a smallish residential home which should be in keeping with the neighborhood. The lot was bought by a local couple and the house shouldn't really impact the neighborhood too much.

    There's a wildlife trail that runs through one side of that lot and is heavily used by turkeys. I don't know if the new construction will remove those trees, but the turkeys have many other options so they should still be able to travel freely.,

    Claire

  • NHBabs z4b-5a NH
    yesterday
    last modified: yesterday

    I have been awol due to a couple much enjoyed family visits and am just catching up. Interesting chat on the bunnies in PM2’s beds. I will be waiting to see if there is further news. It is difficult to let nature take its course, whether it is predation or deserted nests. And a thoughtful reflection on wildlife photography. I find that I am mostly unsuccessful and most often just enjoy watching them. I don’t have feeders or bird baths, and so rely on the garden itself and overall surrounding habitats to attract wildlife, and that often isn’t close enough for reasonable photos. There were two momma turkeys who hung out with a dozen or so poults for about 10 days, and though I saw them frequently and they left feathers where they were dusting in the paths of the veg garden, I didn’t get a single good photo of them, though I tried.

    I had an interesting chat several days ago with a fellow doing waterfowl surveys on the river for the federal government - who knew that they did that. I only see waterfowl during migration, and the rest of the season it is either wading birds or flying fisherfolk like kingfishers, heron, osprey, and eagles.

    Swimming in the river last week we saw three eagles and a heron, sandpipers and a kingfisher. And I am starting to see the early beginnings of the wave of migratory birds: a few warblers, gold finches, and some of the sparrows who don’t seem to nest here. They may not actually be traveling yet, but it seems that they have raised their nestlings and are now footloose and fancy free to fatten themselves in preparation for travel.

    Like Claire I am hoping that there will be good rain soon; perhaps the coming tropical storm Isaias will set itself up to drop a good dose of rain without damage.

  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    Original Author
    yesterday

    You have a great place for visiting family, NHBabs. So many things to do and see with the river and the land. I'm sure the family enjoyed the visits as much as you did.

    I wonder if the fellow doing waterfowl surveys was funded at least in part by the Federal Duck Stamp program. According to Wikipedia:

    "The Federal Duck Stamp, formally known as the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp, is an adhesive stamp issued by the United States federal government that must be purchased prior to hunting for migratory waterfowl such as ducks and geese.[1] It is also used to gain entrance to National Wildlife Refuges that normally charge for admission.[1] It is widely seen as a collectable and a means to raise funds for wetland conservation, with 98% of the proceeds of each sale going to the Migratory Bird Conservation Fund. "

    I have a collection of these stamps even though I wouldn't consider hunting birds.

    I'm getting concerned about the track of Isaias which is going farther and farther west and the rain forecast is getting lower and lower. This morning they're saying around 50% chance of 0.4 inches of rain, and not all that windy either.

    I was out this morning before breakfast watering the doublefile viburnums. It's unnerving to see a 9 foot tall viburnum suddenly wilting. It was OK yesterday - I watered a few days ago.

    I'm eating breakfast now on the deck watching the viburnums recover and I'm not sure when lunch will happen.

    Claire



  • NHBabs z4b-5a NH
    yesterday

    It was a great place for family to come during this time to get a break in a spot that didn’t have health risks; they did the drive in one day each way. We spent a lot of time literally in the river staying cool as well as eating seafood and fresh garden produce, doing puzzles, and playing games. I got quite a bit of walking in early mornings with their dog which was lovely as well, and the dog learned to swim, something she hadn’t previously had a chance to do though she enjoys sprinklers and a wading pool at home.

    I am finding myself considering watering ornamentals for the first time in years, though I have regularly watered the veggies. Nothing looks too dreadful yet but unless Isaias sends some our way, I may need to.

  • corunum z6 CT
    1 hour ago

    NHBabs, Our well is 75' deep and although it has not run dry in its 67 year existence, I am unwilling to spend water when, for so long, there was no rain in sight. The areas of this yard that were once never dry, are now hard from the drought. The little brook that ran along the back border and amply fed the back half of the yard, is now a memory. Yesterday, we got 2" of rain in about 90 minutes, but the doublefile viburnum, the persicaria polymorpha I planted in 1998, and the golden shadows dogwood have paid a dear price. When they were planted in 2018, the new evergreen border trees all had soaker hoses placed around them. The soaker hoses that once watered the aforementioned shrubs and plants, were destroyed by chipmunk chewing. I used to buy 6 hose repair kits at once, but got tired of repairing hoses as life presented me with more pressing challenges to manage. So, as a mostly retired gardener now, I hope that those old friends will live, and that tomorrow's storm will keep all the branches on the trees. Gusts of up 70mph are forecast, so soaker hoses may not have made any difference anyway. But, after that 2" of rain, they all are showing robustness where they weren't crispy. I crossed over the CT River today, and I've never seen so many sandbars revealed so far from the riverbank. Maybe 150-200 feet out from the bank in some areas. 😢



    Memory is selective, but it's been the worse year in my recent memory for heat and dryness. They look better today...but not the brown parts, of course. I said next year I will plant silk plants - tired of losing so much - and CTLady asked if I was planning on silkworms, lol. Might as well!

    ~~~~

    On a happier note, the male cardinals get all the oohs and ahhs, but she is darn pretty IMHO.


    The bluish spots around her tail are cleome blossoms I had to shoot through.


    Under the blue arrow is a nuthatch that literally danced his way around the heritage birch in search of protein. I watched him for 5 minutes or so and thought he could use a little deerstalker cap - he was so thorough!


    The birch bark waves and rolls give all the little birds as much challenge as my neighbors seek with every 1000 piece puzzle they do. At least the birds get a full tummy. 😊

    Jane


  • claireplymouth z6b coastal MA
    Original Author
    1 hour ago

    At least you're getting some rain, Jane. None here recently and the latest forecast says 0.17 inches of rain from Isaias.

    We're in moderate drought now in Plymouth, MA:






  • corunum z6 CT
    23 minutes ago

    I wish that the storm's calmer and wetter disposition would drift over all the dry areas of New England and bring much needed rain to everyone. Bless the farmers.