rick7072

Korean Chrysanthemum

Rick (zone 6b, MA)
last month
last modified: last month

My first time growing Korean Chrysanthemum, I planted this cultivar 'Campfire Glow' in April. It just started to flower nicely a few days ago and I hope it'll have another few weeks ahead of it, even after we get our first frost, whenever that may be. But I'm concerned about the yellowing on the margins of the leaves - with some creeping browning on its heels - and wonder if that could end up ultimately cutting short the blooming period and ending its season prematurely. Any idea what it is and what I can do about it? If it were any other plant, I'd just call it normal end-of-season senescence and let nature have its way and reclaim it. But this is just starting to bloom, and yellowing leaves don't seem part of the plan.


Comments (18)

  • Marie Tulin
    last month

    What a lovely color. Where did you buy it?

    No I don't think it's winding down. I've had Sheffield pink with dark healthy foliage at Thanksgiving. I'm sure someone probably knows the culture better but a couple of questions may help: when did you plant it? iDid you fertilize it? As it was setting buds did you water well

    It is my understanding that mums should be fertilized through the summer stopping at some period I don't remember. (early July?) Adequate water is important during the period when it is setting buds right through its flowering period . I don't know how late in the season aphids but lI've seen a mum quivering with aphids. but they were on the stems. They can generally weaken the plant. Looking forward to other answers.

    Rick (zone 6b, MA) thanked Marie Tulin
  • Rick (zone 6b, MA)
    Original Author
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I know - I love the color too. It's gorgeous. I got the plant from Select Seeds and Plants in Connecticut. I think you may be right - I didn't water this well during our heat and drought waves in July and August, and that could be the source of the yellowing leaves now in October. I fertilized it once. My first time growing Korean Chrysanthemum (I planted it this May) and I'm not sure I took care of it as well as it deserves.

    It's interesting seeing the photo in the online catalog six months after buying it - mine has a much more pronounced orange color compared to the more pink shade online.

    https://www.selectseeds.com/perennials/chrysanthemum_campfire_glow_plants.aspx

  • FrozeBudd_z3/4
    last month

    Must now be 30 years ago that I ordered up some chrysanthemum seeds from Park Seed, I do not recall the name of the mixture, though seems it had Korean in the name, possibly not, though saying "The cooler the weather, the earlier they flower." Sure enough, I had gotten some early blooming beauties and a few flowering much ahead of the others, I think even in August! At the time, I hadn't known much about mums and made the mistake of dividing them in the fall and had then lost those most desirable of the lot, sigh!

  • Marie Tulin
    last month

    Rick, have you been watering recently? Dig down and see if the soil is moist in the root zone. If its dry,water. There;s still time to encourage the root system to grow. You don't want encourage rot, so don't drench them daily. The root system will keep growing right through November

    I'd bet they'll come back next year so you get another chance to to it right.

    If the ye low annoys you enough trim off the most obviously discolored leaves.


    I see you live in Ma. If it was convenient would you consider sharing a division with me next spring? I have Will's Wonderful and Cambodian Queen in abundance. I may have others, depending if they come through winter alive.

    Rick (zone 6b, MA) thanked Marie Tulin
  • Rick (zone 6b, MA)
    Original Author
    29 days ago

    Hi Marie - I just checked the root zone and it’s moist. We did get a good rain within the week, and it has been raining at least moderately in the fall. Very glad to be done with the summer drought.


    I just looked online for Will’s Wonderful and Cambodian Queen and they are beautiful. Thanks for the offer and let’s see how our plants are doing next spring.


    I‘m here outside of Boston and we haven’t had a frost yet, but I just looked at the weather for the next week and I see we might get down to 31° next Saturday. I’m sure our hardy Korean Chrysanthemums can make it through that with no problem, but I’m curious to know: what kinds of temperatures can they take? I see them being described as flowering till late fall, and you mentioned that your Sheffield Pinks had healthy foliage at Thanksgiving, but I assume that’s dependent on the temperature? Can they survive down to 26, 22, into the teens? They were actually in bloom around Thanksgiving? What a treat.


    It’s a thrill to finally be growing these.


    Here’s my ’Campfire Glow’ today:


  • Marie Tulin
    29 days ago

    Hi,

    Yes they were in bloom at Thanksgiving. A bit spindly but so are all my garden grown mums. Any full sun I have is crowded with other vegetation. Usually the flowers are finished by the time we've had repeated hard frosts. My memory may be imperfect by I think it takes a few hard frosts or a sustained period below freezing to really finish off the foliage.

    I'm going to mulch my patches of mums under pine needles.

    Cambodian Queen is bright pink, and is very cheerful as the days shorten.

    My Will's wonder is less bright than I recall. It's pretty but with the white center reads pale pink from a distance. I killed my sheffield pink a few years ago. I don't remember how.

    I looked at that conn. seeds and perennial website. Interesting site. How was their service and were the plants you got robust? The prices were excellent and shipping seems in line with other mail order companies. (expensive when all's said and done)

    I hope we all make it through Covid round two with our sanity intact and re-connect in spring.

    I live outside Boston as well, where "the shot heard around the world" was fired. The debate still continues whether that's Lexington or Concord!



  • Rick (zone 6b, MA)
    Original Author
    28 days ago

    Marie - yes, the service from Select Seeds and Plants was fine and the plants were robust so I'm pretty happy with them.

    Katob - thanks for the tip about the yellowing of the leaves coming from an earlier drought. That's kind of what I'd presumed. I'd like to check out the Central Park Korean mums some day.


    Where can I get seeds for Korean Chrysanthemum cultivars?

  • Rick (zone 6b, MA)
    Original Author
    28 days ago

    btw, I've been confused about the concept of Korean chrysanthemums. Do all Korean Chrysanthemums bloom into late fall, and conversely, are all late-fall-blooming Chrysanthemums Korean Chrysanthemum? Are those two categories pretty much equivalent? Would love to read more about them somewhere.

  • katob Z6ish, NE Pa
    27 days ago

    To be honest I don't think there are set rules for what qualifies for a Korean mum since the crosses were made a while back and being hybrids there might be other species involved, but I think the late flowering and taller ones (3-4ft) are usually called Korean mums. Actually I think your 'Campfire Glow' might be more a rubellum hybrid and not Korean anyway, but I'm sure people would argue that.

    I didn't see any easy sources for seed that looked like they would actually give you the old fashioned type. You might have to find a promising stand now while they're in bloom and sneak a few dried seed heads in late November!

    While you are hunting down some seed to buy, I would start with seed from your own plants. I find that the flower forms of seedlings stay relatively stable, but colors will be all over the place and you'll likely see a nice range even if you start with one color.

    Rick (zone 6b, MA) thanked katob Z6ish, NE Pa
  • Rick (zone 6b, MA)
    Original Author
    27 days ago
    last modified: 27 days ago

    Great idea to save the seeds from my 'Campfire Glow' and it'll be interesting to see what the children look like.

    I'm also wondering how long my plant will flower. Though it just started flowering a week ago, after some wonderfully warm weather our first frosts this weekend are going to be hitting hard and fast: down to 24 Saturday morning, then 27 Sunday. We are sure NOT being eased into our frost season.

    I'm curious to know why you think the 'Campfire Glow' might be a rubellum hybrid rather than a Korean. What distinguishes the two?

  • Marie Tulin
    27 days ago

    Interesting about rubellum. My first thought when I Campfire Glow was that it and Sheffield Pink and Mary Stoker have a relative in common somewhere in the past. Based on looks alone, there's a more open tending-towards-floppy aspect to them. It's not science, I know.

    Rick (zone 6b, MA) thanked Marie Tulin
  • Rick (zone 6b, MA)
    Original Author
    27 days ago

    Thanks, Marie. I just looked up 'Mary Stoker' and it's a beautiful color. It's considered a rubellum? They're generally a little more open and a bit floppy than the Koreans?

  • Marie Tulin
    27 days ago
    last modified: 27 days ago

    I don't really know- I didn't look it up.....speculation.

    If you look at the last two posts in the October Garden's photos there are photos of a beautiful spread of Sheffield Pink and Cambodian Queen. I really miss my sheffield.

    Two gardens in my neighborhood have big plantings of them. I'm going to double mask, knock on their doors soon to beg for some divisions next spring.

  • Rick (zone 6b, MA)
    Original Author
    27 days ago
    last modified: 27 days ago

    Just looked at those photos - her spread of Sheffield Pink in front of the shrubs is gorgeous. The color goes perfectly with the blue-purple of the Raydon's Favorite Aster.

    I've learned that Korean mums were initially bred in the 1930s by Alexander Cumming at Bristol Nurseries in Connecticut. Their garden catalog from 1939 is archived on the web here. Wonderful to see all these cultivars.

  • Rick (zone 6b, MA)
    Original Author
    16 days ago

    Oh well - the blooms of my beautiful Chrysanthem ‘Campfire Glow’ didn’t survive the freeze we had early Friday morning last week. It was pretty much our first frost of the season but it was a doozy, going down to 21, along with 4” of snow, one the earliest snows we’ve had in a long time. And I think there was another early morning temperature of 28 the next day, and the plant just didn’t make it. So while I was expecting that I would keep blooming for a couple of weeks after my tender annuals were killed by the first frost, that just didn’t happen because the first frost was a serious freeze.

    Oh well - I’ll hope for better luck next year. And now, to rub salt into the wound, after that freezing weather we’re now having a week of unusual warmth in the 60s and 70s.


  • Marie Tulin
    15 days ago

    mine are nearly gone aswell. There might be a few buds that nestled down. I wonder if we'd thrown a blanket over them for the0 whet/her we c643d have g6tten the0 hang 6n.

    s6rry f6r the c6de...what ha--ened/

  • Rick (zone 6b, MA)
    Original Author
    15 days ago
    last modified: 15 days ago

    Thanks, Marie. if 21 degrees can kill Korean Chrysanthemum, I wonder how yours managed to survive to Thanksgiving that year as you mentioned before. Maybe that year it didn't get particularly cold in November?