caflowerluver

Question for pet owners who deal with lots of shedding from their pet.

caflowerluver
last month

Our current dog, that we adopted last March who is an 8 YO Dachshund mix, is constantly shedding. She doesn't have long hair all over, only a lion like mane behind her ears to her shoulders and tuffs of hair on her chest. Most of her hair is short like a smooth Dachshund. I brush her outside with a soft natural bristle brush that helps to get rid of some of the lose hair. But she seems to have endless supply of loose hair.


I had the vet check her over and did a blood test and there is no allergies or anything wrong with her. I don't know what she is a mix of but it seems to be a shedding breed. We have hard wood floors and tile and am daily sweeping up hair. Any recommendations for a better brush? She is on Science Diet for senior dogs with tiny amount of salmon oil added.


Thanks.





Comments (50)

  • maifleur03
    last month

    Are you certain it is the dog's hair? That kind of dog can shed but it is unlikely that you would see the hair.

  • foodonastump
    last month

    What a cute face!

    My dog is the same. All year long. I use a furminator on him which is as aggressive as I feel comfortable going. Never thought to ask the vet about it.

    caflowerluver thanked foodonastump
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  • sandk
    last month

    Dogs shed, Furminators are great and a robot vacuum will save you lots of frustration. Good for you for adopting an older pet.

    caflowerluver thanked sandk
  • gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
    last month

    I use pet grooming gloves. My dog won't sit still for me if I try to use a regular brush - he's strong and wriggles too much. In between the grooming appointments, I use the gloves. They don't feel like a brush to the dog.....it is really more like petting or a massage and he would sit there all day if I kept doing it!!

    They sell them through Chewy or Amazon

    caflowerluver thanked gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
  • whistle_b
    last month

    The dog is black. Why would you not see the hair? I had a beagle. They shed constantly and blow coat spring and fall!!! It was like tumble weeds all over the house. I used the gloves and a Zoom Groom which worked fairly well. As she aged she would not tolerate any kind of stiff brush. It was a never ending job. I now have a standard poodle which doesn't shed. However, she drools! So I'm constantly wiping up spots off hard wood floors. No dog is perfect, but I would never live without one.

    Your pup has the sweetest face. And thanks for adopting.

    caflowerluver thanked whistle_b
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    We've always had dogs that shed a lot. The German Shepherds we've had have always had a fluffy, not quite down-like but that's the idea type of undercoat. It comes out all year, not just in the spring. At the height of shedding season, we'll take them for a bath and whatever the groomers do seems to remove a lot of the undercoat material. For a week or so.

    We use a Furminator, try to vacuum it up regularly, and otherwise just live with it. Our floors are never free of hair but that's a small compromise to make.

    PS - dogs can be trained to, more or less, remain calm and stay in one place while being "worked on". It's an important behavior for when being groomed or at the vet. Think periodic commands of "stay" followed by a treat not too long afterwards. They'll figure it out.

    caflowerluver thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • Dolly
    last month

    Beautiful dog.

    caflowerluver thanked Dolly
  • amylou321
    last month

    Dogs shed. Cats shed. People shed. All my dogs shed like mad. Long or short hair,doesn't matter. I brush them because they love it,it doesn't really solve any problem as far as cleaning goes. I have to dust everything and clean the floors anyway,dog hair or no. So it doesn't bother me. Besides, me and SO shed just as much, and that needs to be cleaned anyway. Might as well add some dog hair into it. Well worth it for what you get back, IMO.

    caflowerluver thanked amylou321
  • 1929Spanish-GW
    last month

    She's adorable! Science Diet is cr@ppy food and kibble alone is not a great diet - even with the best brands.

    My two go-to foods are Wellness and Stella & Chewy's. I feed canned Wellness (grain free for mine, but it's not a necessity for all dogs). Then Betty gets some Stella & Chewy's freeze dried raw lamb. Cricket gets Stella & Chewy's grain free beef kibble because we have a hard time keeping weight on her.

    My go-to for great dog advice is Whole Dog Journal. They do an annual wet and dry food analysis that you can get access to with a subscription. Excellent resource for all things dogs.


    Whole Dog Journal

    caflowerluver thanked 1929Spanish-GW
  • Ninapearl
    last month

    she's adorable!!! the 2 breeds i've had in the past that were the worst shedders were huskies and corgis. my danes shed but it isn't terrible. i use the zoom groom and it really pulls the loose fur out.

    https://www.chewy.com/kong-dog-zoomgroom-multi-use-brush/dp/45799


    when you had blood work done, did it include a thyroid panel? if not, i'd ask for one. thyroid issues are common in senior dogs and can have a big impact on coat condition.

    caflowerluver thanked Ninapearl
  • socks
    last month

    Adorable pup.

    caflowerluver thanked socks
  • Jim Mat
    last month

    I use a pin brush.

    caflowerluver thanked Jim Mat
  • nicole___
    last month

    I'm so glad you adopted her. What a precious little girl!

    caflowerluver thanked nicole___
  • mle0782
    last month

    Adorable!! We have 2 dogs, Beagle and short hair lab mix who are healthy as can be and shed all the time. I could be a test lab for vacuums! We do a deep vacuuming once weekly and then run the Roomba about 3 time weekly. It is a godsend and helps a lot. Good Black Friday deals!!

    caflowerluver thanked mle0782
  • Kathsgrdn
    last month

    Get a good broom. Sorry but all I seem to do is sweep. My dog, Chewie's hair is so long it kills vacuums so I quit vacuuming it up. I also get him shaved, which helps some. He's a Golden Retriever mix.

    caflowerluver thanked Kathsgrdn
  • Ont_Gal
    last month

    I have a very long haired pure bred Papillon....and yes, of course he sheds. we have carpet all thru, so, there are bits and pieces of hair all year long. He isn't fond of being bathed or brushed, but it has to be done as regular as possible as I am allergic to any sort of animal-when he is kept brushed and his blankets are kept washed, it seems that there isn't as much hair around.


    caflowerluver thanked Ont_Gal
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    "Science Diet is cr@ppy food and kibble alone is not a great diet"

    Our last two dogs were outplaced as puppy training dropouts from the Guide Dogs for the Blind organization in San Rafael, CA. They breed and train dogs to provide to sight-impaired individuals free of charge. At last contact with them, they had three full time veterinarians on staff. You can be sure a major part of their responsibilities for the health of their hundreds of dogs includes overseeing and monitoring their nutrition

    As of my last contact with this organization, they exclusively use Science Diet dry dog food, supply the same to the breed stock, pregnant dogs, puppies, and dogs there for training, and advise those providing new homes for their dogs, whether as Guide Dog users or the recipients of out-placed dogs, to continue using Science Diet.

    We've followed their professional and well experienced advice. Anyone saying otherwise needs to have the daily experience of looking after what are hundreds and thousands of dogs over decades and decades to have comparable knowledge and skin in the game and I think that's very unlikely to be found at a magazine.

    caflowerluver thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • summersrhythm_z6a
    last month

    Your dog is cute. Try a poodle next time. Poodles are non-shedding dogs. :-)

    caflowerluver thanked summersrhythm_z6a
  • yeonassky
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I now have two non-shedding dogs. Before I always had shedding dogs. Each type of dog fur has their own kind of work.

    These poodle mix dogs have to be brushed at least every couple of days or their poodle type fur begins to curl up and knot. The cockapoo tends to need to have her fur cut every 6 weeks; my Labradoodle every 3 months. I do their electric clipping and scissor cutting as I always have. My Labradoodle is fine with other people but not so fine around other dogs and my cockaboo bites when her fur is being cut unless it's by me.

    I have a kiddy swimming pool that I cut and clip their fur in.

    When I had fur shedding dogs I would use the vacuum cleaner on them first then a brush. It worked perfectly and it was easy to train them if one were standing at one end with treats and the other one were doing the vacuuming at the back.

    caflowerluver thanked yeonassky
  • desertsteph
    last month

    It was like tumble weeds all over the house

    I have those also! sometimes I pick up a wad, put it in front of her face and ask 'is this a friend of yours? ' I get a blank stare back... I brush her and vacuum her (she loves that). been thinking about getting those gloves too. wouldn't trade her for a furless dog tho. but I have threatened to spray glue her.

    caflowerluver thanked desertsteph
  • pds290
    last month

    We use a deshedding blade that works well on coats like this, but don’t overdo it. My cat LOVES it, but when I first started using it, I noticed bald spots. Not connecting it with her new brush, I brought her to the vet. He ran many tests to figure out why she was losing her hair. $$$. Turns out, that when I brush her as much as she’d like, it takes out not just the undercoat, but all of her coats. Now I’m more gentle and pay attention to when I should stop. We have much less shedding. I couldn’t find the one we use, but it’s similar to this:

    https://www.overstock.com/Pet-Supplies/Hertzko-Pet-Deshedding-Tool/24012946/product.html

    We’ve used it on various short furred cats and dogs and have significantly decreased loose fur around the house.

    caflowerluver thanked pds290
  • lily316
    last month

    I have a standard dachshund and I don't notice the shedding. Both my dogs are shorthaired but the Maine Coon makes up for ten dogs.

    caflowerluver thanked lily316
  • Lukki Irish
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I agree a change in food might help, there are lots of great products on the market that steer away from filler ingredients like corn, wheat and soy. All of which could be a healthier option for your girl (who is soooo cute!!). I used to go with only grain free, but at the Vet’s recommendation, I switched to a food with some healthy grain in it like oats. I’ve been feeding Ellie who’s 9 Dr. Tim’s along with a little (Merrick Pate’) soft food mixed in for almost 2 years now. She has a heavy shed in Spring & Fall, but she no longer sheds near as much in between. I just don’t know if it would be a good food for all older dogs though. It’s 72.00 for a 40lb bag, which may seem pricey however, she only gets two cups a day. A bag will last up to 2.5 months so in the end, it’s healthier food for less than a lot of the larger cheap bags of dog food.

    As for brushes, I just use a Kong rubber brush. Labs are known for being heavy shedders, they have a thick undercoat that can also be hard to get too. This brush works wonders and she loves the way if feels. It didn’t cost an arm and a leg and it works!

    https://www.chewy.com/s?query=kong%20dog%20brush&nav-submit-button=



    caflowerluver thanked Lukki Irish
  • caflowerluver
    Original Author
    last month

    Thanks everyone for the replies. She loves to be brushed. Just sits at my feet and lets me do it. The brush I use has very soft bristles, like a person's brush, so doesn't get rid of much loose hair. I will have to read up on all the different products. I don't mind the shedding, though it drives DH crazy. I wouldn't trade her for any other dog. She is so sweet and well behaved and affectionate.

  • 1929Spanish-GW
    last month

    @Elmer - I have friends who live just up the street from there. We can agree to disagree because the topic of dog foods is always a charged debate. As for Whole Dog Journal, it's a great resource/starting off point for information and research - not your typical "doggie rag". I've discussed topics out of it with my vet on many occasions.

    caflowerluver thanked 1929Spanish-GW
  • annztoo
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Also look at the slicker brushes made for cats. I find they catch and hold short hair much better than typical brushes. I've used the furminator and it works well on double coats, but you have to be careful not to overuse it since it will scratch and irritate the dog's skin.

    Look into getting a Roomba for daily cleaning of the floor.

    caflowerluver thanked annztoo
  • gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
    last month

    Also wanted to add that my dog is perfectly well behaved at the groomers and at the vets. But I do not have the same sort of facilities available to me that pet grooming salons do....no tall table, no neck harness, not the same sort of tools and equipment, etc. so I'd either have to brush him on the floor (awkward and inconvenient) or on my dining room table (no thanks!!). The gloves work anywhere and do not require perfect stillness......although they do seem to encourage it, as the dog considers it a very pleasant experience and will sit for hours for it..

    caflowerluver thanked gardengal48 (PNW Z8/9)
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    " We can agree to disagree because the topic of dog foods is always a charged debate."

    It is? Certainly not among the trained professionals. Meaning, veterinarians. They rely, overall, on the pet food companies for different appropriate formulations for different animals in different circumstances. Why? Read on.

    One of the very smallest veterinary specialties, in terms of numbers of board certified practitioners, is the group of Veterinary Nutritionists. These are veterinarians who have gone through extra years of training and education to become experts in animal nutrition, usually covering several or more different species though some specialize further. Many of them work as independent consultants (meaning, they don't have their own physical offices with a daily parade of patients but rather consult with clients and other vets), or they're teaching/researching faculty members at vet schools, or they work for pet food companies.

    All the large pet food companies have full time nutritionists as employees and for the smaller ones, as active consultants. If you want to be sure that you animal's nutrition needs are expertly formulated and covered by the food you provide, choose a product produced by such a company. The information isn't hard to obtain.

    caflowerluver thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • Kate
    last month

    We had a German Shepard and I called her a German Shedder. She shed a dog a day, and I vacuumed everyday and again right before company. She wasn’t allowed in all the rooms which helped, but not much you can do. No dog now and I can’t believe how long I can go between vacuums!

    caflowerluver thanked Kate
  • 1929Spanish-GW
    last month

    Here are two food surveys from the same source on Hills and Wellness as an example. Not looking to argue, so this is my last contribution to the conversation.

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-reviews/hills-science-diet-dog-food-adult-dry/

    https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-reviews/wellness-dog-food-core-dry/


    caflowerluver thanked 1929Spanish-GW
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    "Here are two food surveys from the same source on Hills and Wellness as an example. Not looking to argue, so this is my last contribution to the conversation."

    Oh my, this is the website run by a human dentist. Do you think he knows anything about companion animal nutrition? I don't.

    He makes money by recommending different dog foods, providing a link to a seller, and then getting a commission for that customer purchase.

    Do you consider that to be either an independent or knowledgeable operation? I don't, it's the opposite.

    This is not a credible information source. Really and truly not.

    caflowerluver thanked Elmer J Fudd
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month

    Have anything to add of your own knowledge and experience?


    Yes, this website is as unauthoritative and deceptive about its lack of ethics as it was at any past time.

  • Lucille
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Elmer J Fudd

    Have anything to add of your own knowledge and experience?


    Yes, this website is as unauthoritative and deceptive about its lack of ethics as it was at any past time.


    Elmer you made a similar allegation in the linked thread and several came forward disputing your allegation and includes some valid viewpoints supporting the website. As well, there is some quality dog food info posted, it is a valuable thread .

  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Thanks for keeping track. Nothing has changed. Especially reader attitudes. People don't want to hear what they don't want to hear. Anyone without the clarity of thought to question advice coming from a site sponsored by a human dentist with questionable and not fully disclosed deceptive business ethics and practices deserves the misinformation they receive.

    Unfortunately, their pets are innocent victims, they deserve better.

  • cyn427 (z. 7, N. VA)
    last month

    Our lab mix sheds like crazy, even after a good brushing. I also vacuum him occasionally. Who knew he would love that and actually comes over when I have the vacuum out. Too funny. Labs are horrible shedders!

    caflowerluver thanked cyn427 (z. 7, N. VA)
  • Hot Rod
    last month

    Some sort of robot vacuum. We have two for our condo and they are set to run every morning at 9am.

    caflowerluver thanked Hot Rod
  • caflowerluver
    Original Author
    last month

    I would love to get a robot vacuum but DH, the engineer, says it wouldn't work because of the way our open floor plan is designed.

  • adellabedella_usa
    last month

    We have a small dog in the German Spitz family. He does through a big shed a couple of times a year, but not a whole lot during other times. We programmed our robot vacuum to make a daily run. It is usually full of cat hair and human hair. I'd highly recommend getting one.

    caflowerluver thanked adellabedella_usa
  • Hot Rod
    last month

    I have no idea why a robot vac wouldn't work based on a floor plan, unless you have multiple elevation changes, like steps down/up into various rooms. Our floorplan is pretty choppy and our iRobot has only gotten "lost" one time.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzc3FSVKOYg


    caflowerluver thanked Hot Rod
  • Ninapearl
    last month

    I would love to get a robot vacuum but DH, the engineer, says it wouldn't work because of the way our open floor plan is designed.


    most robotic vacuums come with at least 1 "divider" so you can keep it confined to one room/area. i need to get a couple more because i also have an open floor plan and right now, i'm lining an area with throw pillows to keep roomba where i want it! lol

    caflowerluver thanked Ninapearl
  • Anonymous flyer
    last month

    Your dog looks so cute!!! Like so many people said before, dogs shed and there is nothing you can do to stop it. However, you can reduce it by feeding a proper diet, supplements and regular brushing. Dogs need Omega 3 and Omega 6 rich food for skin and fur maintenance. I always look at the labels for these before I buy food for my pooch (I order Blue Buffalo from Petcare rx). you can also buy supplements like Vetriscience if you feel that your dog is shedding too much.

    caflowerluver thanked Anonymous flyer
  • annztoo
    last month

    No problems with using Roomba in open floorplans. My last two homes were open-floor design and I had no problems. You can just by extra 'towers' to keep it where you want.

    caflowerluver thanked annztoo
  • Lukki Irish
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Anyone without the clarity of thought to question advice coming from a site sponsored by a human dentist with questionable and not fully disclosed deceptive business ethics and practices deserves the misinformation they receive.


    I’ve seen you post this over and over again and it’s bunk. Absolute bunk. The site is not deceptive, you’ve just probably never read their pages of disclosure... but if you believe it so strongly, then why not prove it. I would really love to see what you think is so deceptive.


    Human Dentist? This is new, I’ve always believed that all dentists are human.

  • eccentric
    last month

    We had an American Eskimo - a bear type that weighed 25 lbs. There are no words to describe the shedding. But what I wouldn't give to have to deal with it now. I fully understand the posters who have Keeshonds and Pomeranians! Our dog began grooming at 6 months of age. While he did suffer from hypothyroidism at age 12 until the end of his life, that was not the reason for the shedding - he just had a lot of furry white hair, He died at nearly 17 this year but his fur will be with us forever.


    We have had shorthaired dogs before and they shed as well but not nearly to the extent that our little darling did. But the Eskie did not smell. Those with short haired dogs no doubt have suffered from hairs being caught in their feet - at least with the double coated Eskie his furry hair did not catch in our feet. We did not have our Eskie shaved and it was funny when he was groomed because he would obviously look much nicer when freshly groomed and the hair on the groomer's floor was something else, but he still shed like you wouldn't believe. Enter the Swiffer duster. I love the colouring of the Keeshond - Eskies are white with biscuit.- my clothes are mostly black.


    He also had an excellent diet.


    I was able to sign on today - a shocker!

    caflowerluver thanked eccentric
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Since the topic is animals, in such a conversation, not all dentists are for humans. There are veterinary dentists and it's reasonable to expect one or more has developed a special interest in nutrition. In such a hypothetical case, the "sponsor" of such a site would be someone who went to vet school whose professional education and training could be the foundation for assessing pet food. That's why I made mention of it.

    For the last time, let's think about the bogus information on this site. Content produced by people without proper professional training. Without rigorous test procedures.

    This website:

    - does not perform chemical assays of the food they "test"

    - does not perform studies of the food they "test"

    - does not do double-blind studies comparing a given food with another, or with a "placebo"

    - does not compare content analyses on labels to accepted professional nutritional standards for animal requirements

    - does not employ people with professionally specialized training. Those who produce the content know diddly- squat about the subject matter. Know nothing about what animal nutritional requirements are.

    They read labels. Period. That's not testing, not comparing, not subjectively assessing. Not providing expert opinions. It's zippity do dah. Nothing.

    So, of what value is anything on there? Zero, I say. A big zero.

    How is the content produced? From unqualified people copying over product label information, and from reader comments. That's it. Heavens to betsy, don't any of you understand that this is useless non-information? No insights from analysis or use, no value added. It's as if one of you read a label and picked one product over another because it had 40% guaranteed protein instead of 35%. Does that matter. Is 35% adequate, or is 40% too much. You don't know. Similarly, they don't know.

    If you don't know, you don't know. The people producing this website don't know, don't have useful information, and rely on people swallowing their drivel and clicking on links to produce their income.

    The internet can be a very useful information source. Part of successful use is learning how to separate real information from not-real information. Anyone can put up a website with anything on it. No qualifications, no regulation, no validation, no nothing. It's like lining up random people in a public place and asking them a non-trivial question. You'll get a variety of answers. There are ways to assess which may be more likely valid than others. The same is true of "information" from the internet. You need to consider the source.

    This is a commercial site masquerading as something else. The "information" it presents is nonsense. Gullible people will accept it, more thoughtful people will see it for what it is.

    For those who like to link to prior discussions on recurring topics, please be sure to bookmark this page. I took the time, for the last time, to try to explain what others should see on their own. There's no need to repeat any of this for those who don't want to have their (unwarranted and well intentioned but misinformed) decisions challenged.

  • foodonastump
    last month
    last modified: last month

    My personal experience with Science Diet is that a chronic skin condition seemed to clear up after switching to their sensitive skin and stomach line. This after years of an increasingly black and hairless belly, right up his sides. Medications (steroids?) and special shampoos had not helped. We’ve since switched him to 7+ and he seems to be doing well.

    Of course this is just anecdotal and has no value as an experiment. With vets profiting from the prescription lines and their marketing benefiting from their donations, questioning motivation to recommend is not unreasonable. But as Elmer says, companies like this have many vets and nutritionists, etc on their payroll using science to come up with their formulations. Maybe just maybe these professionals know something more than the average label reader.

    I don’t claim to know whether or not their food is the best out there, but I’d have a hard time believing they’d have so many vets using and recommending their products if it were “cr@ppy.”

    Full disclosure I have an interest in the company.

    caflowerluver thanked foodonastump
  • Elmer J Fudd
    last month

    Dogs and cats, like people, can be allergic to certain foods or ingredients, you're right.

    This is something that's an individual reaction and is rarely if ever a problem with the food. (Excluding contamination situations).

  • whistle_b
    last month

    Back to the shedding/grooming. Please be very careful if you use any kind of tool that is a blade unless you have experience using them. There's a possibility that you could hurt the pup accidentally.

    caflowerluver thanked whistle_b