austin6097

Uneven wall cabinets on sides of kitchen sink... HELP

austin6097
last month


My area of focus trying to fix is the two wall cabinets on the side of the sink. They are 9" and 15" right now which would look awful being uneven. Any ideas?


Secondly, I was considering removing the lazy susan for double blind cabinet (has anyone done this on a corner and can post a picture of it?) so that I may fit the trash pull out there (who wants a spice rack next to their sink lol).


Thank you!

Comments (22)

  • lucky998877
    last month

    Leave out both small uppers...nice and open...make your window larger if you can...and make the corner upper go straight to the wall...or do shelves in the corner, also straight. The corner like that is very dated.

  • austin6097
    Original Author
    last month

    @lucky998877 the window can not be changed it is already in place.

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  • lucky998877
    last month

    BUT you can leave those cabinets out. Research some updated kitchen designs...that corner cabinet is not user friendly, nor does it look good. I had one in a kitchen that was built in 1995. Is this a renovation then?

  • austin6097
    Original Author
    last month

    @lucky998877 can you send a picture of what you are referring to?

  • Buehl
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Do not do blind corner cabinets. Even with the pullouts, they are probably the worst way to handle a corner.

    Instead:

    Base...Void out the corner.

    • That would give you 15" for a trash pullout (24" voided corner + 3" filler to allow cabinets/drawer to open on each side of the corner leaves you with 9" to incorporate into the 6" cabinet -- 9" + 6" = 15")
    • It would also mean the 12" cabinet next to the range can now be 21", much more useful!
    • Just remember that you need 3" of filler on each side to allow all cabinets to clear each other on the corners. (The need for filler would also be true with a blind corner.)


    Upper...

    Either let the cabinets on the range wall end at the window wall with no cabinets around the corner -or- put in an Easy Reach cabinet.

    An Easy Reach is a corner cabinet with a 90-degree cut out instead of the diagonal front. Diagonal fronts are out dated and the associated cabinets are generally very inefficient storage. They also cut into the "face" room in a corner -- they're "in your face" when trying to work there.

    You could do an Easy Reach with uneven sides:

    • Option 1: the side on the window wall longer to incorporate the 9" cabinet you show. It would give you a door around 21" wide. But, you would still have uneven doors on the sides of the window. So, on to Option 2...
    • Option 2: the side on the window wall is shorter. Make it 6" shorter and incorporate those 6" into the 9" cabinet to give you a 15" wide door to match the cabinet on the other side. The Easy Reach could be 24" x 18". That would be 24" on the range wall and 18" on the window wall.


    Here's an example from GWer BluBird's kitchen; it's an uneven Easy Reach:


    If you look closely, the door on the left is a regular door for the left half of the cabinet on the left wall. The door that covers the right half of the cabinet on the left wall and the cabinet on the right wall is a piano-hinge so it opens both the cabinet on the right wall and the right half of the cabinet on the left wall.

  • austin6097
    Original Author
    last month

    @buehl I think the blind cabinets make the lines look much fresher and would give me space for a trash pullout next to the sink no?

  • Buehl
    last month
    last modified: last month

    No, they don't. They look outdated and/or dysfunctional.

    You have the same amount of room next to the sink if you void the corner or if you put in a dysfunctional blind corner cabinet.

    Either way, you need 3" filler b/w the 24"x24" void or the blind corner cabinet and the first cabinet on the window/sink wall. That means you only have room for a 15" cabinet. That's wide enough for one bin, but not two.

  • Buehl
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Now, if you're willing to consider a different layout and/or having a sink right-aligned with the window rather than centered, you will have more options.

    If you are,

    • Could you please post a sketch of the entire floor so we can see what rooms there are and how the traffic flows in, around, and through the Kitchen?


    • Could you also please add the distances b/w the left wall and window and the window and the right wall (or whatever is on that right)?
  • PRO
    Elizabeth Minish Design
    last month

    Buehl is right on the money with all suggestions. Lazy Susans and blind corners are at best C-grade real estate in a kitchen. The promise much more than they ever deliver. With a 15" pull-out by the sink (+3" spacer at the corner) and a 21" cabinet beside the range you get A-grade real estate and you'll never miss the corner as drawn.


    Same thing with the upper angled cabinet.

  • PRO
    HALLETT & Co.
    last month

    100% skip that angled upper cabinet. Dated and unattractive. Run that wall of cabinets straight into the window wall or if you need the storage meet at an Inside corner but now the 9” cabinet can be resized to be a useful size.

    Have you seen the 6” pullout next to the sink? IMHO most of these are incredibly expensive with little value.

  • austin6097
    Original Author
    last month

    @hallet&co can you post a picture of what you mean? Thank you!

  • austin6097
    Original Author
    last month

    @elizabethminishdesign If you see that window with trim on the design goes right up to edge of 9” cabinet now. That window/trim can’t be moved. Do you have something where I can visualize for the upper cabinet what you are saying? What size cabinets are you talking about for the uppers in the corner? What size play do I have?

    My main concern right now is the 9” and 15” uneven wall cabinets next to sink. I couldn’t think of many things more awful from a design standpoint.

    It isn’t the biggest kitchen so I want to put cabinets wherever I can and not simply remove them and not replace.

    Thank you.

  • lucky998877
    last month

    See how the cabinets run straight to the wall on the left side of this window? No angles, no small cabinets shrinking the window area. I absolutely hated my lazy susan in the corner, I voided the corner in my new kitchen.




  • lucky998877
    last month

    If you must have something come all the way to the window, then this is still a much better option than the angled upper.



  • Buehl
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Pictures are posting again, so I added pictures of BluBird's Kitchen. Personally, I prefer it to open shelves since I'm not a fan of constantly cleaning/dusting (or having to wash dishes again b/f using them).

  • PRO
    HALLETT & Co.
    last month

    What lucky posted is what I was thinking- sidewall cabinets run straight into the corner and the window can breathe.

  • Buehl
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I agree, I think Lucky's post with no cabinets on the window wall looks better overall -- in her picture. However, we would have to see it in the context of your kitchen to determine which would look better, no cabinets on the sink wall or including cabinets.

    If you are short on storage, especially dish storage outside the Prep Zone, then I would probably recommend keeping the upper cabinets on the sink wall.

    "No cabinets" is all well and good, but if it makes the Kitchen less-functional, then it's not a good idea.

  • Buehl
    last month
    last modified: last month

    I've been looking more closely at your layout and there two red flags: Range/island aisle and Prep Zone.


    First...The aisle width between the range and island is far too narrow. It's less than 33". The minimum recommended aisle width is 42" for a one-person and always a one-person work aisle. The recommended width increases to 48" for two or more people working in the Kitchen.

    Remember, aisles are measured to/from the items that stick out the farthest into the aisle, in this case the range on one side and the counter overhang on the other. Aisles are not measured to/from cabinets. Cabinet measurements (24"D) only include the box, they do not include the doors/drawer fronts or the counter overhangs. They also do not account for other, deeper items like ranges and refrigerators.

    This means you cannot have an island as large as you show...unless there's room to expand farther to the right and/or the bottom. Without a full-floor sketch, I cannot tell.

    Range/Island aisle: 131.75" - 27"D range - 72"W island = 32.75" for the aisle

    If you account for a 48" aisle, that means you only have room for an island 56"W in its current orientation. That would mean 2 seats at 24" per seat linear space (the minimum recommended). [BTW...the island in your layout will also only fit 2 seats. You need at least 72" of clear space for 3 seats. Those "CLBase" items intrude so you no longer have 72" of space for the seating. You lose 6" to 9" to those "CLBase" items.]

    Note: The refrigerator/island aisle is fine: 138" - 27"D Ref (most are really 27"D, not 24") - 51"D island = 60" for an aisle. You only need 48" (unless you want more), so this aisle is OK and, in fact you have more room below it for whatever room is below.

    I assume you are getting a built-in/fully integrated refrigerator, not a counter-depth. Even built-ins are around 27"D, not 24" 24" is usually only the refrigerator carcass/box depth, not the doors & handles. (Counter-depths are 31" or so deep.) Don't forget to include any needed air clearances around the refrigerator in the overall depth & width -- top, sides, back.


    Second...You do not have enough counterspace b/w the range and sink. Prep Zones need direct water access and sufficient counterspace to be truly functional. The minimum recommended is at least 36" of straight counterspace adjacent to the sink, with 42" or more better. When the sink is close to the corner, you could use the counterspace on the other side of the corner. It's not ideal, but it's workable.

    Your island does not have a sink, so it won't be particularly functional for a Prep Zone.

    Me recommendation is to either add a sink to the island and rotate it or move the range to the left so you have more counter space b/w the range and corner.


    Finally, the orientation of your island is not ideal. Islands usually work better/are more functional with the long side facing the range, not the sink.

    In your case, since you cannot fit the island width you show, you will fit more seats or have more cabinet space if you rotate the island.

    If you rotate the island, you have room for a 63" wide island, 7" wider than the other orientation. If you can expand it even farther "down", you could fit a wider island.

    I assume you have a Dining Room some place, correct? Do you also have a "breakfast nook" table? If so, do you really need 3 places to sit? If the Dining Room is far away, then I can see having island + Nook (if you have a nook), but if all three spaces are in the same area, I would question the need for all three. I'd probably eliminate the island seating since you won't have that many seats (only 2). Or, you could eliminate the Nook and expand the island into that space, assuming it works functionally.

  • Buehl
    last month



    Work Zones:


  • hu818472722
    last month

    We did the double blind cabinet and love having the garbage/recycling next to the sink-extremely handy. We have a insert called a magic corner or pull out tray which allows us to store items in both cabinets . We also did not do the upper cabinet next to a window, did a small bump out so cabinet door wouldn't open too close to the wall. Originally planned to put shelves there but that was complicated, went with easy plaques instead.

  • Buehl
    last month

    If you use a blind corner base with a swingout, keep a small child around to retrieve items that fall off. If anything falls off, you won't be able to close the swingout until you retrieve the item from within the depths of the blind corner. You'll need a small child for that!

  • hu818472722
    last month

    We have not experienced that issue in ten years of owning it but agree there would be potential for that if you place small items on the inside corner. We use it for things like x-mas plates, large platters and bowls we don't use often.