migreenthumb

Meanwhile Up North...First Bud of the Season!

Shockingly to me when I was outside planting and weeding before work today, I discovered one of my roses has a bud!


The Ingenious Mr. Fairchild is the rose which has given me the first bud of the season, and usually that is Therese Bugnet!


I'll have to grab a picture because most don't believe things like this without "proof", ha!

I'll also try to grab a picture of Chianti's thorns. I keep forgetting...



Steven

Comments (40)

  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    7 days ago

    Here is TIMF!

    The third image is Therese Bugnet. She's only about a day or two behind!

    Steven

  • strawchicago z5
    7 days ago

    So exciting to see first buds in my zone 5a: Munstead Wood & Evelyn & Comte de Chambord & Dee-lish & Mary magdalene & Yves Seedling are the first ones. They are mostly 10 year old own-roots. I have only 3 grafted-on-Dr.Huey .. they are WAY BEHIND, like 1 month compared to own-root Austins & OGR.

    MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet thanked strawchicago z5
  • joeywyomingz4b
    7 days ago

    Wow!!! Congratulations that's so fun!!

    I'm only just starting to see clusters of leaves coming out...buds are going to be another month yet. The pot pets in the laundry room are starting to bud, but those are cheaters as I bought them this spring already leafed out.

    MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet thanked joeywyomingz4b
  • Kristine LeGault 8a pnw
    7 days ago

    Stephen, a gardners greatest thrill to first see those beautiful leaves forming and then buds.

    I have 10 roses that are so new that I have never seen a bloom, so those buds are really exciting.

    I know how excited you must be feeling.


    MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet thanked Kristine LeGault 8a pnw
  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    Mad! I always love your succinct and direct posts with excellent information and recommendations.

    I LOVE your suggestions of the early bloom, cheery soft yellow species with their fine, ferny foliage.

    I actually have received Rosa hugonis from High Country Roses, and (I'm *still* waiting on them) Rosa primula is supposed to be coming to me from Hortico! I'm just tickled pink! Or would that be yellow? :)

    I'm hoping to position them as specimen shrubs or as dominant property line markers.

    Steven

  • summersrhythm_z6a
    7 days ago

    Nice photos everyone! Spring is finally here!

    Steve, what kind of trees are these? Cleaning ground next to an old carriage house foundation, found this baby under a huge honeysuckle. Is this a small Hydrangea?



    I am not sure if this is a pear tree or not.




    MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet thanked summersrhythm_z6a
  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    7 days ago

    Summers, the first image the leaves look like they could be a Hydrangea, but I feel like it looks a lot like Viburnum of some sort.

    The tree hmm; are you able to get any pictures up close of the leaves/bark? I only ask because the habit of the tree does not appear to have the upright, more formal growth I associate with pears. My knee-jerk reaction is Malus of some type. Sorry!


    Steven

  • summersrhythm_z6a
    7 days ago
    last modified: 7 days ago

    Thanks Steve! I know you are a pro on trees. I will take a better photo tomorrow. I know what you are saying, pear tree is more upright, this one is round. The flowering tree is next to a lot of apple trees. Here is another photo. We planted more fruit trees this spring, so far we planted 4 apples, 5 pears, 6 flat wonderful peaches. I still have 1 apricot, 5 persimmons to be planted. 4 hardy fig trees are too small, need to stay in pots, will plant them in the ground next year. For other potted fruit trees I have 2 Meyers Lemon, 1 orange and 1 pink guava. I have noticed many rose gardeners are also fruit tree growers.



    And the baby tree is next to this old honeysuckle, Do you think it’s over 50 years old? It was about 2 stories tall and covered about 200 sq ft area. It took me a whole afternoon to cut it down to this size. Want to make it into a big bonsai. How old do you think this one is?



    And you were right about the big trees by the driveway, they are maples and Chinese elm.

    MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet thanked summersrhythm_z6a
  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    7 days ago

    Summers, you give me too much credit. I'm just an enthusiast is all! I'd honestly say Ken from Adrian is more of an expert with trees (particularly conifers) but he can be a little scary to interact with only due to approach and questions asked.


    Did you ever discover what type of maple they were? Sometimes it's hard to tell from pictures versus in person! Our big native maples are Black, Sugar, and Silver. Acer rubrum (red maple) tends to resemble a smaller silver with less dissected leaves.


    Hmm; it could very well be that old, those honeysuckle seem to grow very quickly. I've noticed their annual rings are quite large in most instances and prone to heart rot. I'm curious if they're anything like Aspen (short lived individual stems but a long-lived root) We removed two from our yard years ago. They tend to be quite invasive and you'll find them in natural woodlands where they do not belong. I'd say chop that sucker into a bonsai and trap it in a container where it belongs, lol!


    You have so many incredible fruits! You're one of the few others I've encountered that even know what a persimmon is! My Grandma Phyllis had me try them years and years ago. I enjoy them; most varieties other than the Asian 'Fuyu' must be completely softened before being edible. Astringency like nothing else I've ever tried (looking at you, Hachiya!). I've also learned that most American persimmons are dioecious which is simply a fancy way of saying males and females are separate individuals.


    I have a "Chicago Hardy" fig, and so far, despite claims, I've not been impressed and have not ever gotten ripe fruit. I'm considering digging it up and containerizing it! My Red Haven peach from last year bloomed this spring, but I believe our later cold snap may have burned the blossoms.

    I've added currants, I have gooseberries, and I'm contemplating adding Downy and Smooth Serviceberries not only for personal enjoyment, but also for the birds. Their fruit (at least Smooth Serviceberry) is sweet, juicy, and kind of like a blueberry.


    Steven

  • summersrhythm_z6a
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    Thanks Steve. Maybe I will keep all my fig trees in pots. I have 1 fig on a patio Olympian fig tree from HD on its 2nd year. 3 Chicago Hardy were from Tractor Supply, bought them about a month ago, they are small cuttings, only paid $6.99 each I think. Just saw Olympian fig patio tree for $22.99 at Tractor Supply yesterday. I had 2 gooseberries in pots on its 2nd year, but somehow after the move I only found 1 left. I was afraid to plant them earlier because I heard they can take over the land in no time. Is gooseberries that bad? Here are 2 photos of the flowering fruit tree.





  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    6 days ago

    Aww, cute pupper!

    That looks like an apple tree!

    I've never heard of any Ribes (gooseberry currant) being considered invasive. Autumn Olive is though!
    I'd plant them out. The two I have used to be one at my grandmother's house, and that was there for over 30 something years and it was only ever one and there were never any that popped up anywhere else on her property.
    To me it sounds like somebody had some baseless hate for them. The only concern one might need to consider is the potential as Ribes as an intermediate host for white pine blister rust fungus and certain local regulations may prohibit their planting.

    Here are my two gooseberries. They're sprawlers!

  • summersrhythm_z6a
    6 days ago

    Thanks again! Now we have 18 apple trees! :-) I will plant my gooseberry today! :-)

  • rosecanadian
    6 days ago

    Mad Gallica - you just answered a question I had. :) I was wondering if I could grow my found rose...Rosa Hugonis (I'm pretty sure) as a shrub. I planted it in a place that's not very accessible...in our front concrete raised bed. And the wall of the bed has started to fall over (stacked flat rocks not connected together...we didn't build it)...so I can't get in there to attach it to a trellis. But...yours looks pretty huge! A bush form of Hugonis in the spot it's in would get pretty cumbersome. Hmmm....


    Steven - your first bud is The Ingenius Mr. Fairchild! Such pretty flowers...exciting! My first buds are Jacques Cartier and Nicole Carol Miller. I'm pretty surprised to have buds already!

    MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet thanked rosecanadian
  • summersrhythm_z6a
    6 days ago

    Steve or anyone, would you please tell me what I have here? Thanks!









    MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet thanked summersrhythm_z6a
  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    6 days ago

    Hmm. The flowers look like a Narcissus almost, but I'm not sure.

    The next appears to be Red Osier Dogwood.

    They last looks to be Box Elder (Ash Leaf Maple) Acer negundo

    Steven

  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    6 days ago

    Definitely not Narcissus, lol.
    I looked again and saw that the flowers are on a stalk. Hmmm

  • Mischievous Magpie (CO 5b)
    6 days ago
    last modified: 6 days ago

    Wild hyacinth?

    Unopened shape reminds me a lot of hyacinth.

    MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet thanked Mischievous Magpie (CO 5b)
  • mad_gallica (z5 Eastern NY)
    6 days ago

    Maybe Scilla.

    Rosecanada, you are out west, right? It is much more likely that a found rose is going to be R. foetida than R. hugonis, but I think they have very similar growth habits. Own-root, they will spread a bit.

    MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet thanked mad_gallica (z5 Eastern NY)
  • summersrhythm_z6a
    6 days ago

    Thanks for your help! I might cut down Box Elder. Will trim Red Osier Dogwood. I think someone planted those as a red hedge in front of an antique iron fence that is covered with grapes. Thanks again!

    MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet thanked summersrhythm_z6a
  • rosecanadian
    6 days ago

    Mad Gallica - it was only "found" in the sense that I did quite a few cuttings of my friend's Rose Hugonis from her old yard to plant in her new yard. All of the cuttings took...and I think I may have thrown one of them into my garden. It only grew to about 3 inches over a few years, because my soil there is really shallow because of glacial till. It also could be a seed from one of her many hardy rose hips (a lot of OGRs). So, I'm not exactly sure what it is...but the stems/leaves look like Hugonis. :)



  • rosesmi5a
    5 days ago

    Summer: that bulb is the highly invasive, will spread everywhere Ornithogalum umbellatum: see http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=f298



  • summersrhythm_z6a
    5 days ago

    Thanks rosesmi5 a. I am just finding out what we have here, this is our 1st spring at this historical place.

  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    5 days ago

    I do not think it's Ornithogalum umbellatum; the flowers and formation do not look right at all even their arrangement on the stem itself. A brief search for images online demonstrates the difference.

    Steven

  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    5 days ago

    An image from online.
    Summers, do these look as different to you as I?

    Steven

  • summersrhythm_z6a
    5 days ago

    I just took a closer look, it looks different than that. Mine looks like some type of lily.



  • Mischievous Magpie (CO 5b)
    5 days ago
    last modified: 5 days ago

    Oh! How about ornithogalum nutans??

    Pic from the internet, didn't crop it because lazy:



  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    5 days ago

    I think Scilla (Squill) might be an excellent candidate.

    Steven

  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    5 days ago

    Mischievous might have it!
    Chionodoxa is an excellent suggestion!

    Steven

  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    5 days ago

    I think Scilla (Squill) might be an excellent candidate.

    Steven

  • Mischievous Magpie (CO 5b)
    5 days ago

    I'm far too invested in this now

  • Mischievous Magpie (CO 5b)
    5 days ago

    That's funny @MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet, I just deleted my comment on chionodoxa because I was sure it was wrong. Looking at photos of nodding (drooping) star of Bethlehem, it looks more that that to me. I couldn't find ANY photos of chionodoxa that have a silvery cast to the petals.

  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    5 days ago

    Mischievous, I felt like it could not be Star of Bethlehem because the flower Spike and the formation of the flowers themselves were wrong but it does look more like Scilla or Chionodoxa based on flower form and arrangement. The Star of Bethlehem does not have that tubular center.

    Isn't this fun! Group Garden Brainstorming!

    Steven

  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    5 days ago

    Golly. DROOPING STAR OF BETHLEHEM

    Now THAT looks bang on!
    I suppose if it's as aggressive as the other species, ditch it!

    Steven

  • Mischievous Magpie (CO 5b)
    5 days ago
    last modified: 5 days ago

    Hmm, that was a fun mystery 😅 I'm almost embarrassed to admit the level of satisfaction I gained from finding a good possibility.

  • summersrhythm_z6a
    5 days ago

    Wow, you got it! Thanks! It looks like a bad plant though. I haven't used any chemicals to kill the weeds yet. how to kill it? I know the vinegar trick, but that won't kill the bulbs, just the top. I have hundreds of this plants, don't have the time to dig them out. If you guys know an easy way out please let me know.

  • Mischievous Magpie (CO 5b)
    5 days ago

    @summersrhythm_z6a, could you maybe very closely mow/weedwhack the foliage down to the ground? You might have to do it a few consecutive years but in theory the bulbs should die out in time if you deprive them of being able to store energy via sunlight for the next year. I would also not them them flower, as they could set seeds that small creatures like ants spread. The bulbs are likely very deep, so to reach them with chemicals I think you'd have to soak the ground pretty well... sounds awful for the environment.

  • summersrhythm_z6a
    5 days ago

    I will try that. Cut all of them down this week. Thanks for the idea!

  • MiGreenThumb (Z5b S.Michigan/Sunset 41) Elevation: 1,029 feet
    Original Author
    3 days ago

    I forgot to give a huge thanks to @rosesmi5a for steering us the the appropriate direction. Sometimes I get to stuck on smaller details, and even if something isn't one species, it could still be another baddie in the same genus.

    Thanks again for your clarity.

    Steven

  • rosesmi5a
    2 days ago

    :) no problem -- learning goes best when it is a team supported effort!


    I have declared war on O. umbellatum here. Its bulbs are so little and so far down it can be hard to get every piece.