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katyajini

Depth of soil guard for growing mint? And sunlight needs for mint? 7A

katyajini
2 months ago


I have a spot in my garden where I can grow mint in the ground. It is open shade with afternoon sun. The soil is rich but draining and any mint I have planted there seems to be thriving. I would like to push (plastic) barriers into the soil around the area I allocate for the mint and also between different varieties, to prevent spreading. How deep must the barrier be realistically? At the moment I have access to 12, 8, 4 and 3 inch barriers, the shallower barriers being cheaper of course. As far as possible I would like to grow my herbs in the ground, it is a lot easier in my situation.


Also, ideally, how much sun does mint need for best growth and/or flavor? The mint I have growing in the ground gets a little more shade than the same variety in a large pot (Yerba buena/ sweet mint from Bonnie plants). The one in the shade *seems* to be growing a little slower than the one in the pot but that maybe it is still happily growing roots in the soil. Some plants do better with a little shade, so just wondering.


Regarding sunlight as well, I acquired two mint varieties, orange mint and lime mint that can have reddish/maroonish tint to the leaves and stems. Does more, or less, sun bring about the reddish color?


Thanks!!!!

Comments (9)

  • katyajini
    Original Author
    last month

    @party_music50: Thank you! Its all new to me. I never knew mint is so easy to grow. Some mint seem to grow more aggressively than others though!

  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    last month

    I used to try to grow mint, but in the ground, it was too much upkeep trying to keep it where you wanted it. I did grow it in pots for awhile. Worked out okay, but the roots can go down through the drainage holes. I tried planting a pot in the ground and it spread outside of the pot. Growing mint in a container that is sitting on a patio or in a window box or hanging container would be my best suggestion.

    katyajini thanked prairiemoon2 z6b MA
  • Stephanie, 9b inland SoCal
    last month

    I have chocolate mint and it spreads a little in SoCal, but mostly it has declined over the years. I have just a tiny spot of it this year.

  • prairiemoon2 z6b MA
    last month

    That's interesting Stephanie, thanks for sharing that.

  • raee_gw zone 5b-6a Ohio
    last month

    My experience has been that it will send roots under barriers (maybe 12" would be enough, I don't know) and it will also clamber over barriers pretty easily. So, the barriers would need to be both deep and high.

    After my mints proved too hard to control in ground, I resorted to growing just a couple in pots that are set on an area that is elevated by concrete blocks and topped with tile - makes it very hard for them to reach the ground.

    katyajini thanked raee_gw zone 5b-6a Ohio
  • laura_in_fl
    20 days ago

    I agree with what everyone else has said about mints - they are escape artists! Though some types are much more aggressive than others.


    Be careful when pruning or harvesting. Any bits of stem or root that you drop on the ground can root where they fall. Composting mint risks spreading it everywhere in your compost.


    The little seeds also scatter and sprout readily, so it’s best to cut off blooms before seed sets.


    Half-day sun should be fine. In a hot summer climate, mint is fine with partial shade.

    katyajini thanked laura_in_fl
  • katyajini
    Original Author
    17 days ago
    last modified: 16 days ago

    Thank you so much everyone!

    Today I finished potting up into large pots all the mint plants I have.

    I am kind of embarrassed of how many different kinds of mint I collected this summer. And it was all worth it. Not in any particular order, Apple mint, Moroccan mint, Mojito mint, Lime mint (2 distinct types), Orange mint (also two distinct types), Yerba Buena, Lavender mint, Eau de Cologne mint. I am really surprised how pleasant, distinct and different the scents of Lime, Orange, Eau de Cologne and Lavender mint are. Very little 'mint' and a lot of something else and very uplifting. Apple, Moroccan and Mojito are variations of spearmint. The most beautiful I find are Apple mint and Lime mint and these two are the most vigorous. Mojito mint grows very tall on these stiff, erect stems.

    It really is lovely to garden and be surrounded by these fragrances.

  • raee_gw zone 5b-6a Ohio
    16 days ago

    I planted Chocolate mint and Orange mint, but I never could distinguish the difference in scent - they just smell like mint to me. But, the spearmint that came to stay from my neighbor's is easy to tell! .You are lucky that you can tell the difference in all your mints