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segarner8

which is the most cost effective roof style???

2 years ago

Hi everyone! I’m really hopeful that I can get some help! My husband and I have been in the preliminary phase of building our house for the last six months. We originally wanted a hipped style roof. However, because of various reasons, one including building material inflation, we were recommended to go with a gabled roof. Which now I have come to like. The style of the home that we are building is traditional colonial and Cape Cod. We have had some poor luck with our architect. Recently the roof he designed would not allow for a gutter on the front elevation of the home which will lead to water and foundation problems. Not being a professional/being an amateur I noticed “This could be a problem” and then our builder/contractor confirmed my suspicions by bringing it to our attention. I’ve been working on ways to re-design our floor plan and roof style. I recently discovered I have a love of architecture, and home design.

again, because of building material inflation, we have went with a gabled roof. I am wanting to cut costs where I can so that I can maintain my square footage. I’m wanting to choose a rough style/plan that will save me the most money. My questions are the following:

  1. Is it more cost effective i.e. cheaper, to construct your roof line as a cross cable or gabled roof with a reverse gable? See attached photo.

The pitch is 8:12, The deck is 10 foot wide, a house is 40‘8“. For a total girth of 50‘8“.

  1. Is it more cost-effective i.e. cheaper to extend the trash service and roof line to cover a deck or use a shed roof over the deck to cover. See photo

Comments (10)

  • PRO
    2 years ago

    The most cost effective is often a simple all hip roof. The surface area is the same, but you do not need the gable walls.

  • 2 years ago

    Mobile homes with very low slope roofs, like 3:12 or less end up with small money saving gabled ends. Pole barn structures also use low slope roofs and gable ends. No 8:12 roof is going to be anywhere near as inexpensive as a 3:12 roof. At least for a single story house.

  • 2 years ago

    Not sure how you can't have a gutter on any side of a roof where it's needed. It's probably not bad luck, just misunderstanding.

    If you like Colonial and Cape Cod styles, then a hip roof is probably not going to lend to those styles. But, whether it's hip or a simple gable is a minor difference of cost, if any, in relation to the entire project. There are many other things which will take a bigger bite out of the construction cost, like not using an 8:12 pitch.

    And regarding your porch-under-the-gable question, do the math. For a 50'-8" width at 8:12, the height of the ridge (peak of roof) will be around a 16' tall space in the attic, so you'll have enough room for a 2nd story and depending it may seem out of proportion compared to the 1st story.

  • PRO
    2 years ago

    Note what local tract builders are doing. Simple design, lower pitch. Note that 4:12 is minimum desired for most roofing. Trusses. Comp (metal is 2.5-4x more). 8:12 is a lot more materials and the labor rate increases w pitch.

  • 2 years ago

    I want to see the roof plan and elevation that wouldn't allow for gutters?

  • 2 years ago

    The simple L-shaped "Gable Front and Wing" house you posted is part of the "National Folk Style" popular in the US from 1850 to 1890 when the railroads were built.

    It appears you are willing to spend money on an 8 in 12 roof pitch but not on the roof configuration. Its difficult to advise you on cost savings with inconsistent design parameters. But its safe to say there are better places to save money. Build a strong and attractive building envelope and save on things that can be added or upgraded later.

  • PRO
    2 years ago

    IMO without seeing the elevations you have been shown with the house you are designing this is impossible to answer . I agree about the dog and also have no idea why any roof cannot have drainage. I have a 1950s MCM ranch it has a low pitch roof it suits the house perfectly. I find most new homes deisgned with gables have more gables that ever needed so if you have an actul architect get some elevation drawings and share them here .IMO a hip roof in no way would suit on a colonial or cape cod.

  • 2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    About 25% of surviving Georgian colonial houses have hipped roofs and they were the most common roof type in the southern colonies.

    A colonial Cape Cod didn't have a hipped roof or a porch or dormers or a wing or a front facing gable or a nested gable.