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Weigela entwined w. Rose of Sharon - How to sort out this mess???

2 years ago
last modified: 2 years ago

As our weigela was just blooming ( zone 5, Toronto, Canada) I discovered a rose of sharon in its folds, looking for light ! Upon further inspection I noticed that a thicker stem of the rose of sharon had been cut off below. We assume ( but do not know) that the previous owners had had a rose of sharon growing, but cut it down and then planted a wegela in its place. Regardless...

We would like to give both plants their own places, it's just a question of when and how? Obviously, the rose of sharon would do much better if freed from the entanglement, my husband thinks the sooner the better, and if we can pull it out it might even flower this year if given more room. The weigela just finished blooming, so would not loose out on any flowering. I am concerned, since right now its hard to get to them, about damaging both plants and therefore I am more leaning towards waiting till late fall when both shrubs have shed their leaves and we can see better what we are doing. Then dig up both, pull them apart, replant separately. Looking forward to some suggestions.










Comments (12)

  • 2 years ago

    Well, that's a bit of a conundrum!! I wouldn't do anything until fall, as soon as they lose their leaves. And I'd make a choice on which one you would prefer to keep, as the process of root disentanglement is not likely to be easy is and probably going to stress both of them. I envision some serious hacking needing to take place so I'd pick one over the other to be more careful with.

    I know what my choice would be. I have never been a fan of ROS in any form. But this is your choice ;-)

  • 2 years ago

    I'd cut the ROS off at the base, apply full strength (non-diluted) glyphosate very carefully to the stub, and call it done (use a dropper, empty mustard container, etc. to drip it on). Even small ROS seedlings don't pull out easily, and I think by the time you would dig and untangle the roots, you risk both plants.

  • 2 years ago

    I use triclopyr concentrate on cut stems- nothing survives that.

    RoS are a dime a dozen around here and are considered weeds- I'd treat it like one.

  • 2 years ago

    Rose of sharon is an invasive plant. There are sterile forms but yours looks like a seedling deposited by a bird and it's going to be seedy and weedy. Please kill it for your own sake, for your neighbors and for any nearby wooded areas.

  • 2 years ago

    ROS is invasive in some places.. mostly because it spreads its seeds too mucgh ... like in the middle of a valuable W ... and odds are.. some bird stopped at the W after eating a seed and planted it there.. im not buying your theory about the prior owner ...


    the best day in my garden life.. and the first house was the day i finally killed the prior owners last problem plant.. why it took me 5 years is beyond me...


    do what ruth said.. and save yourself 8 hours of backbreaking labor.. just to kill both plants ...


    ken

  • 2 years ago

    cearbhaill - do you think the triclopyr works on cut tree stems better than glyphosate concentrate? I have both, and since I spend a good chunk of time each season dealing with saplings, I want to be sure I'm doing what works best.

  • 2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    Triclopyr is better on woody material - glyphosate on herbaceous plants.

  • 2 years ago

    Interesting to read your comments and I am quite surprised by your apparent general dislike for R.O.S., although I do understand the sucker issue with them and that the dropping blooms can create a mess. Regardless, I have always liked R.O.S, as they provide continuous blooms from mid summer till frost time. My mother had three bushes in three different colors, each was surrounded by a grassy area, and she never had any problems with seedlings. I had two on my previous property where I surrounded the shrubs with heavy groundcover. Seedlings still did pop up, but I always had plenty of takers for them.

  • 2 years ago

    In a hedgerow, plant tall weigela varieties with other large shrubs, such as lilacs and viburnums, or on the corner of a building so to not block a view. In a mixed shrub border, plant compact varieties with interesting foliage in with perennial flowers or along the foundation.

  • 2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    The above non sequitur is a cut and paste from https://www.gardeningwithcharlie.com/grow-care-for-weiglea/. (Note misspelled name.)

    I’m not sure of their purpose but this poster specializes in this.

  • 2 years ago

    Anybody that wants one can come to my house and get ten for free- they pop up in my wooded area like dandelions in a lawn. I don't even know where a mature, flowering plant even is left- I've removed all on my property but they're still coming in via birds.

  • 2 years ago
    last modified: 2 years ago

    ^^^ Yes, I yank dozens of them annually thanks to the birds. ROS is a terrible plant in the mid Atlantic. I'm glad sterile varieties have been introduced.

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