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nina_lauderdale

HELP w/ tub waterproofing issue (WAS: tub surround tile butting issue)

last month
last modified: last month

This post started about tile, then moved to the problems with my layout which would result in water leakage. Now I would love thoughts on what layout to go with. Back to the original builder layout, shown here? Not sure how the integration between tub and shower would happen.

Context is that I am out $120k and 8 months in AirBnB due to extensive mold remediation, thanks in part to corrupt builder D.R. Horton. Both bathrooms are gutted, kitchen sink area/floor is gutted. Some walls and all first floor ceiling is gutted. I need to move back in asap due to $1000/week lodging. I need this bathroom functioning to move back in. (I will use downstairs half-bath sink for washing dishes until I can get kitchen done.) I can't wait for special order components.





Tub/Shower integration



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Before responding, I'd appreciate it if you would review my comment titled "IMPORTANT BACKGROUND / HISTORY."

EDIT: Several people, including PROs, have pointed out the issue of the tub not having a flange, given that there will be a shower. (It is on a platform.)

QUESTION 1: It can be undermounted - does that make a difference?

QUESTION 2: I've read here and elsewhere about a tile flange kit, although I don't see one on American Std's web site, and I don't know how important it is that it is from the manufacturer.

QUESTION 3: There will be cement/backer board above the tub, but open to studs below. Is there any benefit to having cement/backer board all the way down? It seems to me if it goes all the way down and the floor also has cement board, and the wall/floor seams are sealed, that would at least add a back up layer of protection?

------

Hello, I have a problem with how tile from 3 planes meet (RED CIRCLE in drawings). Contractor is working, need to figure out solution asap.... [I deleted the rest of the original post because based on the comments, it is no longer relevant.]









Comments (51)

  • last month
    last modified: last month

    I feel like every single salesperson has lied to me during this project. They said it would be okay to use as an alcove tub. If I understand correctly, the contractor said it would be grout (prob waterproof). There will be cement board above tub level but not below though. The window is a glass block wall, basically, and it will be gone over to re-seal/caulk it, and I think cement board will be placed on the "sill" - others in the hood have done shower conversions in that spot FWIW. Any further thoughts?

  • PRO
    last month

    IMO start over now .

  • last month
    last modified: last month

    @ci_lantroThank you very much. The salesperson knew it would be for a shower. Ugh.


    The tub can be undermount, does that make a difference?


    "The window has no flashing either. There is no way to flash it effectively after the window has been installed."


    I'm not understanding this, is the second "window" meant to be "tub"?

    Regarding the bench, several of my inspiration photos have benches at the end of a bath/shower so I assume it's doable...? The contractor talked about a couple of ways to waterproof it. One solution was something like fiberglass (over cement board. Everything will be cement board.)

  • last month

    Yes, you can have a bench in a shower, but in a properly built one, not in the mess that you have there. You were misled and it appears also dealing with a clueless contractor. That tub is only meant to be installed in an alcove as a tub only. Tubs meant to also serve as showers aren't flat around the edge, on three sides they curve up into a piece that goes behind the tile, so that water is directed back into the tub. No, it is not okay to have cement board only down to the tub surround and then studs below. There is no amount of grout, caulk, or fiddling around with all the other suggested details that can make that installation anything other than a leaky mess, which will at some point end up with mold and rot underneath. Putting cement board all the way down and underneath and sealing it will just make a holding place for the water that will leak down around the edges of the tub...it's not if but when. Whoever sold you that tub either didn't understand you wanted it to also be a shower, or they were incompetent or dishonest. This is a start over with a different tub if you want a shower. I'm sorry.

  • last month

    Grout is not and was never intended to be waterproof. Waterproofing needs to tie in from thr glass block to the wall system waterprrofing and the tub needs the tile flange so the tile can be installed over it. No amount of caulk will ever waterproof that mess It is a mess and will always be a mess until you redo it correctly.

  • last month

    Thank you. So what is the waterproofing? Even say I replaced the tub with a flanged alcove tub. I thought cement board was sufficient but I guess you're bringing up the waterproofing because of the window? In other words, if flanged tub and no window, cement board is standard, correct?

  • last month

    @debrak6 Thank you. So, if I get a flanged tub, I still need cement board to floor?

  • last month

    Typical Cement board by itself is not waterproof, it actually lets water pass right thru it, it in not effected by water which is why it is used. There are waterproof cement boards (or substute material) like Goboard. On typical cement board the waterproofing is a topical applied liquid (painted on) or a Kerdi board or membrane is used. What you have to the right of that inaqdequate tub is drywall which also needs to be cement moard with waterproofing if that is part of the shower. The fact that you are asking quetions for your contractor to execute is horrible. You have a mess and need to stop the work and get someone who knows something in there to tear that all out.

  • last month
    last modified: last month

    Thank you. I am remembering that the contractor has told me about some of the sealing products, so I misrepresented that aspect. But there is still that drywall and the window to be addressed, even with me ordering a flanged tub. Yes, I def need to stop the project, I'd already contacted the contractor. Thanks. The questions are for me to know, so that I wont be in this situation again.

  • last month

    Window meant window. There is no flashing around or under the window much less any way to tie that into waterproofing for a shower.

    Regarding the bench, several of my inspiration photos have benches at the end of a bath/shower so I assume it's doable...?

    "Bench" implies a surface to sit on. If that is the intent, then the bench at the end of a tub with a backrest looks like an accident waiting to happen. Because you can't get your feet firmly, squarely underneath you because of the angle of the back of the tub.

    Digital photography, Photoshop, AI...'photos' aren't real anymore. And even if the photo is real and untouched, there are tons of stupid, impractical things being built.

    Sorry to say but this is a rip and start over with a new plan/ tub/ material and a different builder. This one is next level clueless.

    And, this build is on a wood frame floor. A bad install on wood will do a whole lot more damage than a bad install on a slab.



  • last month

    Your question about still needing cement board to the floor if you get a flanged tub...it's more complicated than that. Cement board to the floor has nothing to do with anything, because there should be no way for water to get outside the tub area. The idea of a seat or bench attached to an alcove tub is just really bad design, and can't really be built and waterproofed properly. No designer or contractor should ever have given you this. If you want a tub/shower, choose one designed to function that way with the proper flange and install tile right in front of the flange, the tile will sit on the tub edge. Framing can be redone to fit. You can have niches at one end, but no bench. Or do a nice large shower only, then you can have a bench. I'm sorry you're dealing with this, but whoever came up with this or told you it was okay dumped you into a hot mess; the only way out is to start over.

  • last month

    Thank you. I did the design, inspired by these photos. Mostly the first blue and white photo is what I liked the best, although I realize it has a deck and only has a hand shower.


    I found it here: https://www.houzz.co.uk/photos/bathroom-with-metro-tiles-and-vinyl-flooring-ideas-and-designs-phbr2-bp~t_10161~a_29-193--47-354?pg=3


    Which leads to this contractor: https://www.houzz.co.uk/hznb/professionals/main-contractors/tim-lawlor-construction-pfvwus-pf~276824127

    and this designer:

    https://www.jillcordnerdesign.com/transitional-bathroom


    (The thing about a bench seat is that it is a place to put things. Some things only a bath lover knows. Years ago in a different house I had a bench seat behind a standard tub as suggested by a contractor. But that was in the day of drywall showers and who knows what that looks like now.)









  • last month

    Question - is the niche - inside the shower enclosure - really going to be 15 ” deep??


    That depth would work if this was a tub only (with a handheld shower head) vs. a regular shower/tub combo.


    Your first inspiration photo that you’ve posted (to show an example of a similar shower bench to the one you’d like to have) has a deep niche on the wall above the bench - HOWEVER, the tub in that photo is not a shower/tub combo - it’s a tub with a handheld shower head. A deep niche is nice for storing extra towels - as shown in the photo.


    A niche that deep in an actual shower will hold a lot of water. Even if it’s been waterproofed correctly + a slight tilt into tub on bottom + shelves - water will still sit inside something that deep.


    Did someone at American Standard understand that the tub was needed for a rub/shower combo in an alcove - or did he/she misunderstand - and think that you simply needed a tub only option for an alcove?


    As others have already explained - cement board is not waterproof. Grout is not waterproof (it’s water resistant). There are special boards that are waterproof (I have GoBoard in one of my bathrooms that was recently renovated - another bathroom has cement board - but a Schluter waterproof membrane sheet was installed on top in order to waterproof the shower.


    I think you need to prepare a list of questions for your contractor - and the questions need to be answered ASAP.


    Feel free to post your list of questions here - and we can see if there are other ones that need to be added to the list.


    I would definitely make sure that solid surfaces are used for all horizontal surfaces - e.g., the top of the shower bench + bottom of niche + shelves (don’t allow your contractor to use tiles with grout lines instead. Have pieces of coordinating quartz/natural stone/corian/etc. installed instead (you could use whatever your’re using for your vanity countertop).

  • last month

    Thank you! Yes, it was going to be 15" deep, but now I am going to rethink everything. The new tub will probably be longer anyway. It was the salesperson at a bath showroom who told me that about the alcove tub. OK, I'll probably post again later. Thanks.

  • PRO
    last month

    You are dealing with incompetence all the way around. The design is incompetent. The execution of the design is incompetent. None of this works, because of the incorrect design. You are going to need to start over at the design phase, plus buy another tub.


    Hire someone competent to design this. That's the biggest failing.


    Then hire someone else to execute the design. That's the second biggest failing.

  • PRO
    last month

    ^^^ exactly. This is a failure of design. No hardibacker down the wall or special caulk is going to fix this. You need to hire better professionals to design this project. It seems like the people you hired were all to happy to spend your money building you something based on pictures that would rot in a year when it’s out of warranty. Someone needed to tell you no.

  • last month
    last modified: last month

    I know it’s difficult to find out that there are so many issues with your renovation - but it’s better to find out now vs. after everything has been finished (and you start having leaks).


    I personally know how overwhelming it can be to discover that your contractor might be in over his head re: renovating your bathroom. I had to have a shower pan + walls reconstructed (and the back wall of the shower had already been tiled with pretty expensive Carrara marble - to the ceiling - which started at 9’ tall and sloped up to 11’ = A LOT of wasted tile).


    Also, the floor tile had pieces that weren’t properly adhered to the substrate = the entire floor had to be removed! Luckily, the tile came up pretty easy + the cement board underneath hadn’t been installed correctly (screwed down - without any thinset underneath) = the entire floor was removed in less than 45 minutes + the original subfloor could still be used.


    I didn’t hire the guy with the cheapest bid either - he was the second highest out of 4 or 5 (and was personally recommended by two law partners).


    A salesperson at a bath showroom should be well versed re: which tubs work as shower/tub combos. That’s upsetting that you were given incorrect information from that person + your contractor didn’t immediately explain that the tub was incorrect.

    Have you spoken with the manager of the showroom re: exchanging the tub? I have heard of flange kits - maybe on a post here on Houzz - or on John Bridge Tile forum. However, I don’t know if it would be an item typically made to fit most models - or only certain ones. In any event, the salesperson should not be misinforming customers - I would expect the manager to approve an exchange. Please let me know - if there is an issue, while I can’t provide legal advice, I can point you in the right direction from a legal standpoint

    Keep your chin up!

  • last month

    QUESTION 1: It can be undermounted - does that make a difference?

    No. Not with a shower.

  • PRO
    last month

    This picture may help ( I will admit I did not read every post! )


    This is from the installation sheet of one of American Standards drop in tubs. It appears you can purchase a tile bead separately from them. Also in the description of several of the tubs, it does appear that they can also be undermounted ( keep in mind you will need to buy a slab of stone to be cut out and installed for that to work ) .

    I would make the bench a solid stone piece that will be slightly higher than the tub as shown in previous pictures.

    Why is the plumbing out side of the studs and not in between them?

    It looks like this is a huge headache. Please slow down and get the right answers to your questions, even if you have to pay an inspector to come over or get a second opinion.

    Best of luck!

  • last month

    The plbg is between the studs but there should have been at least one more stud between the valve and the wall to be able to meet the fastening schedule for a backer board install. Studs 16" OC is the recommended spacing for cement backer board.

    The problem with the under mounted tub in the inspo shower ( first picture w/ handheld and overhead shower head with the monolithic quartz deck) is that the deck is flat and cannot be pitched to the drain on all four sides.

    The other problem in that picture is that the shelves are unreachable without standing up and leaning over/ climbing onto the deck/ bench past a sloped backrest & onto a surface that is both wet and that should be pitched/ sloped to the drain.

  • last month

    Thank you. Good eye that you caught that it had an overhead shower head and not just the handheld. dani_m08 pointed out that the deep shelves, as opposed to a typical shampoo niche, are not a good idea because they will retain water.


    The following I am sharing not to defend the design, bc it has to be totally redone, but just to give what my thinking was, which provides information about features I would like, in case they spur on other ideas. With regard to the bench seat / shelves, I'm not saying that, upon reflection, I stand by this idea, but my thought was that I would NOT reach for the shelves while wet. I would grab a towel, and anything else, before water is turned on. I would restock, organize and clean the shelves when dry. (Also, tile is not as slippery as that slab.) In fact my desire for a bench is not so much to sit on but to put things on while bathing. Neck roll, wash cloth, shampoo, etc. Also because it makes it less qlastrophobic to have a little extra space while taking a bath instead of having a wall a few inches behind your head. In fact that is something I need to keep in mind, because the tub that meets my needs wioth a flash and available soon has pretty much the same slope, so I wonder where my head ends up.



  • last month
    last modified: last month

    "IMPORTANT BACKGROUND / HISTORY."

    I spent 20 minutes writing a comment about why I designed it myself, but I'm too tired right now to recreate it, but for now let me say that this is not a situation of "Wouldn't it be nice to update our bathroom." It's a situation of a building and health crisis of $120k so far, and 8 months in AirBnBs, running out of money and needing to get back in the house, because more AirBnB time means less money to finish the bathroom, which I need, minimum, to move back into the house. So you see that spiral. That combined with my own background, experience and knowledge, which obviously wasn't sufficient, but the logic of why I did the design myself makes more sense when you know the full story.

  • last month
    last modified: last month

    @dani_m08 Oh, honey, regarding legal help, can you help me sue builder DR Horton whose house we've been living in since 2011 (built 2005), when my daughters were 7 and 4 years old, for ruining my daughters' (and my) health, so seriously that my 17 yo daughter couldn't even attend school last year, until she'd received 6 months of weekly (5-hour-long) IV infusions of anti-fungals and anti-biotics, and then only half-time?


    That she is two years behind in school but probably 3+ years behind in functioning? That she is now 17 but I can't imagine her launching until she is 25? That 2 professionals, a psychologist and an educational therapist who herself is on the spectrum, suggested I get my daughter evaluated for Autism until I gave them a run-down of her childhood social and behavioral history, including pictures and videos, such they said there's no way she would qualify for a DSM diagnosis of autism because it requires early childhood onset? And then they believed me a bit when I said that PANS can cause an autism-like presentation?


    Which makes sense because if you look at her Neuroquant MRI, which reports volumetric data for each brain substructure, statistically compared to data of same age, gender, and intracranial volume, that not only does she have areas of extremely high inflammation at >95th percentile, but extreme atrophy as low as 1st and 2nd percentile, and several are in right temporal lobe substructures that are also associated with autism? (Atrophy being much harder to recover from than inflammation -- it's hard to re-grow brain matter.)


    That she is under the care of neurologist who diagnosed her with Auto-immune Encephalitis and that her EEG is abnormal in the right temporal area? That she has completely lost emotional memory?


    That I am so sick that I had a neurological event that the neurologist wants an MRI to see if I had a mini-stroke? That I need to switch to a specialist neurologist bc the regular one ordered an MRI with contrast, which is harmful to someone who likely has a breach in the blood-brain barrier?


    That my high-sensitivity C-Reactive Protein levels, reference range 1-3, is 9.8, an indication that I may now have an auto-immune disorder?


    That I've spent over $120k on this house, although a chunk of that is to cover the 8 months of AirBnB?


    I'm asking because I was in the process of applying to be a client of Just Well Law, whose founder, Kristina Baehr, won a $3M lawsuit against the builder of her own home, when I got an email from them saying they have taken on several huge/class-action lawsuits and so can't do small/individual lawsuits anytime soon.

  • last month
    last modified: last month

    I just realized something. If the highly knowledgeable and helpful @ci_lantro is saying that:

    -- There was no flashing installed around or under the window when the home was built.

    -- There is no way to flash it effectively now.

    -- There is no way to tie that into waterproofing for a shower.

    Then I can't have a shower at that location.

    ** Does anyone have a counter-argument? **

    Because this a big deal for how the layout can be.

    (And frankly, if only @ci_lantro caught this, would a designer have caught this?)

    ----

    @ci_lantro, here is a picture of what a neighbor with the same layout did. Same critique with regard to window? Or is there some other mitigating factor?



    ----

    Below was one idea I looked at, but I find it too tight for my bathroom, in terms of clearance for cleaning. I would have had to get like a 4.5' tub and I don't like the Japanese soakers anyway.



    My bathroom originally had a 60x36 garden tub, and a 34X36 shower, but it was such a tight fit (room is 7'10") that it only worked because the right end wall/skirt (term?) of the garden tub formed the bottom of the shower wall, i.e. the shower glass on the tub side started at the deck, right on that edge.

    ---

    Also @ci_lantro, doesn't that mean that tub/showers that always had a window likely have a water/mold issue, given that it was only as of the 2003 International Residential Code that drywall and greenboard showers were prohibited? Like this one at the AirBnB I'm at. (Built 1972 but gutted 2022, so it might be ok, but previous to the gutting maybe there was an issue?)



  • last month
    last modified: last month

    I am so sorry you are dealing with the situation with your builder and family illnesses; that must be incredibly stressful. I don't mean to pile on, but just because not every poster commented on the same issues (the window being a water penetration problem in the making for example) doesn't mean others didn't notice it, or other potential problems. In every design dilemma, posters tend to comment on what they notice first and maybe not on what has already been dealt with by someone else. It's the sum total of the various comments that can be helpful. I hear your frustration, but it doesn't really matter what any neighbor or Airbnb did, and not one of us has any way of knowing how any hypothetical shower in a photo was constructed, what is underneath, or who has had water issues or not. The important part is that everyone is telling you that *your* situation requires a complete tear out and rebuild to keep *you* from having issues and throwing good money after bad so to speak. You can have a window in your shower...just not that window in that house, if you don't want a leaky mess. Windows can be replaced easily, and a properly sealed window installed correctly. Nobody is trying to be mean or frustrate you; everyone is trying to help you achieve something doable and safe. What you want isn't the norm and has some potential waterproofing and safety issues; it can be done and your best bet would be to find a contractor trained in and using the Schluter waterproofing system. But with money and time and needing to get back in your house asap being issues, your best bet would be to start over with the best and biggest tub you can fit in, and have a tub/shower built properly (with the window replaced.)

  • last month

    If fact, at least two other posters commented on the window so wasn't just me. Worth mentioning is that a lot of people are seeing the photos on their phones and just don't see some of the finer details because of the small screen.

    Almost all of the important stuff in a shower is underneath the tile--stuff you can't see/ will never see in pictures of finished installs. The tile is just window dressing--a properly built shower is waterproof and can be used before the first tile is set.

  • PRO
    last month

    A glass block window with metal frame is no big deal to integrate waterproofing to correctly. But, there has to be the correct type of membrane and sealant used. Caulk ain't it.

  • last month
    last modified: last month

    Thank you both. I'm not frustrated, I'm alarmed by any potential mold scenario that might be common that I haven't heard about. I've been thru 2 significant remediations, I help other people. I spent 12 sessions with a nationally known mold consultant. I've thought about pretty much every square inch of wall and ceiling by this point. I know how to do a cursory inspections of AirBnBs etc. So I wanted to learn and I like to know about construction scenarios that can result in mold for my own health and others I help. (I know about drywall showers, I know about crappy builders not sealing the ductwork in the ceiling, I know about bar and rim joist sealing if you have a 1st floor overhang, etc.)


    I can't imagine what replacing that window will cost, plus would need HOA approval which takes a month, unless an exact duplicate of what I have, so now I'm wondering if I should just go back to the plan the bathroom had when built.


    Meaning a 60" tub only under the window with 34" shower to the right of it.

    I think I could even use the tub (59.5") I bought. Well, I guess not because of the shower having to integrate at the end.

  • last month

    The membrane and sealing of the window to be used in a shower starts with wrapping and prepping the opening BEFORE the window is installed. It really cannot be properly flashed after install.

  • last month

    A couple of other things that are just food for thought. I didn't ignore your desire to have a comfortable place to rest your head and a place for your things while taking a bath. There are tubs with enough ledge to give your head room, especially with a neck pillow. It's also easier to reach things (washcloth, shampoo, phone, etc.) sitting on a bench beside the tub rather than sitting up and twisting around to reach things sitting behind your head. You could also have them build a small tiled ledge along the long interior wall if you have enough side to side room for a few extra inches. Point being that you can have a more typical and easier to build tub/shower arrangement and still have a very comfortable soak.

  • last month

    ^^And, for a window in a shower, I would like to see sill and jamb flashing on the framing on the interior side. A window in a shower takes more 'weather' inside than it ever will on the exterior side.

  • last month

    Thanks so much, every one. What I need help with now is the general layout. The easiest, least risky, quickest to implement (no ”4-6 week“ components). Perhaps the best route is to go back to the original (builder’s) layout.


    ( I have limited money and time because Im almost out of money from the mold remediation and from 8 months of AirBnB. Half the house is gutted, I need to at least have the one bathroom working. Every additional week is over $1k in lodging. I dont want to end up not being able to afford to move back into my own home.)

  • PRO
    last month

    Post a flooring your bath and maybe we can come up with a better plan. My sil has a cheap finger joint wood window in her shower and it’s been fine for twenty years- it starts at chest level so hardly gets wet. Your window would get wet in every shower. I do think a separate tub and shower sounds much better, I dislike stepping over a tub every time I want a shower but I take showers 99% of the time.

  • PRO
    last month

    Well I should have proofread! ‘Post a floor plan of your bath’

  • PRO
    last month

    Is the other bathroom functioning yet? Is that an easier renovation to complete so you can at least move back in whole this is being sorted out and done properly? Can you focus on getting everything else done except this bathroom. Sometimes taking a step away for a little bit is the easier thing to do.

    Truly my heart hurts for you.

    Hang in there!

  • last month
    last modified: last month

    The only functioning bathroom is the downstairs half-bath. Both full bathrooms are gutted. (Thank you builder D.R. Horton for building double-drywall mold-sandwich showers in 2004/5 when 2003 residential building code required cement board.) I was going to start with my daughter's hall bathroom because it is more straightforward, but it was pointed out to me that if I move in and then the Master bath gets rebuilt later, I have all the construction upset -- I am sick and need to recover and the rest of the house is open plan, the master bedroom suite are is the only area with decent privacy, and there will be contractors in the house for kitchen, ceiling, etc. as well. So, no where to go for a safe haven except for the master bedroom suite.


    Still, maybe I should reconsider this decision. My daughter's bathroom needs a new vanity which I have, and a tile surround. I can use the old toilet and tub.

  • last month

    I've posted the floor plan in the OP if anyone wants to provide layout ideas.

  • PRO
    last month

    Go back to the original floor plan. Use the tub you’ve already purchased, build a short wall (30”?) between the tub and the shower with glass above. No it’s not a big blingy shower but it will work great and a good tiler can waterproof it properly.

  • last month

    Thank you. Assuming a 4" wall. that would be a 30" wide by 36" deep. I assume thats not a standard size for pan or glass. Do you know whether thst makes a big diff time and cost-wise?

  • last month

    Also, with regard to the tub, I was surprised how bullnose-y the edges are. Would this work butted up against your wall?


  • PRO
    last month

    What is the model number of your tub? It is designed as a drop in or undermount tub. It is not meant to be tiled in like a regular tub is. But a lot of American Standard tubs just need a tile bead and then they can be installed as an alcove tub.

  • last month

    934002-D0.020

    "Install options – Choose drop-in or under-mount look"

    https://www.americanstandard-us.com/drop-in-bathtubs/studio-60-x-36-inch-drop-in-soaking-bathtub-with-zero-edge/white-2934002d0020


    But due to the window, I wont be using it with a shower.

  • last month
    last modified: last month

    Here is the installation manual. It mentions different types of installs, including flange. It's possible there is a version with a flange, or that it is referrign to one of he other models on the manual's front cover.

    https://lixil.cdn.celum.cloud/139596_2938002-D0_Studo_bath_754532-100_EN_FR_SP_original.pdf


    How did you know it was AmStd?

  • PRO
    last month

    I am pretty sure you had mentioned it at one point.

    This is from page 5 of the install manual - it mentions a tile bead that can be purchased separately which would allow this tub to install like a regular alcove tub with a flange does.


    Hopefully if I am incorrect in my statements, the folks here that are smarter than me will surely let me know.


  • PRO
    last month

    Except, in the Real World, you still can NOT install an aftermarket tiling flange on a flat deck tub. The tub still isn't sloped to direct the spray back into the tub. It collects on the deck, until it rolls off onto the floor. The non waterproofed floor. Where it proceeds to infiltrate through the grout and tile to the subfloor. Same rot scenario.

  • last month

    Both this tub and the a similar tub I like can be made with a flange. https://amaticanada.com/product/american-standard-2934002-d0-020-studio-60-inch-by-36-inch-bathtub/

  • last month
    last modified: last month

    Nina - if you let me know where the house is located, I will check if I know someone who is licensed in your state. I am licensed in a few states - probably not in yours. Also, I am a business attorney - not a litigator. However, I am happy to see if I can refer you to someone.

    I have systemic mastocytosis = many issues related to environmental surroundings + allergic reactions to many things. I understand how debilitating these type of issues can be. I have developed MANY autoimmune issues - and my life has been greatly affected. I am sorry to hear about the issues you and your daughter have been dealing with over the past several years.

  • 27 days ago

    Thank you, I am in Austin, Texas. As I mentioned, Kristina Baehr, Just Well Law is not taking new cases.

  • 22 days ago