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sugatree

How to keep sugar maple trees in pots?

20 days ago

Hi,
I saved two baby sugar maple trees. I planted them in two pots. They are growing perfectly fine. My problem is, I don't have space in my garden to plant them. I'd like to keep them short and small in pots. Is there a way to do this? Thank you

Comments (16)

  • 20 days ago
    last modified: 20 days ago

    Thank you for your advice. The point is, I didn't know they were sugar maple trees. I think they are but I am not sure. They are a kind of maple for sure (my profile pic). I don't want to "torture" them just to keep them as bonsai, 4 feet should be fine, but again 4 feet for a tree that is meant to be 30 ft or more.. It's kind of abusing it. I have nowhere to plant them unfortunately. Public gardens wont allow me to plant them.

  • 19 days ago

    Can you find a home for them on nextdoor or another website? I've given away lots of excess plants.

  • 19 days ago
    last modified: 19 days ago

    We can't see your tiny profile picture. Most likely you have a Norway maple as these come up everywhere from seed very easily. They are considered an invasive species in Ontario where I live. Do not plant it anywhere if it is a Norway maple. No maple will survive in a pot. https://nyis.info/invasive_species/norway-maple/#:~:text=One

    EDITED TO ADD: I just enlarged your little photo. This is definitely not a sugar maple. Even the young reddish leaves of a sugar maple have a different shape. Whereabouts do you live? It might help you identify it. But if you have no place to plant it, just discard it.

    If your objective is to help the environment and you can plant pots, choose some native plants that are host plants to the pollinators where you live. Many of these are pretty tough and will do well in pots.


  • 19 days ago

    " No maple will survive in a pot. "

    Well, that's not true at all!! I have a collection of a couple dozen different Japanese maples and they all live in pots. Some for as long as 20 or more years. As will most of the Asian maple species. And Acer circinatum, which is more closely related to the Asian maples than any other North American species.

    FWIW, the leaf does look more like Acer rubrum than a Norway maple.

    ps: don't get seduced into the concept that only native plants are attractive to pollinators....it's just not true. And try growing a bigleaf maple in a container!! LOL!!!!

  • 19 days ago

    You are completely correct that non-native plants are attractive to pollinators and add value by providing nectar. But some of our native pollinators have caterpillars that won't eat just any leaf. They need specific native plants to survive, so those plants provide food for both the adults and caterpillars.

    It would be great to get a better photo of the plants and to know where they are. Maybe the parent plants are nearby too?

    sugatree thanked partim
  • 19 days ago
    last modified: 19 days ago

    Hi, thank you all.

    I live in Italy. This evening or tomorrow I'll post the pictures of the trees that may be their parent.

    Here are some pictures I've taken today of the baby trees.

    The tallest one is 11.8 inches.




    This is a picture I've taken a month ago.




  • 19 days ago

    You could try the Houzz Italian site. And maybe give them some idea of where in Italy, because Italy has USDA zones 7-11.

    Be sure to post these better pictures too.

    Depends on how big a pot do you have too.

  • 19 days ago
    last modified: 19 days ago

    There are very few native Acers in Italy. A opalus and A campestre occur but afaik most others will be non native and the OP's is neither of those. So the OP's maple is likely to be known to US tree people.

  • 19 days ago

    The parent tree may be fairly close by.

  • 19 days ago

    If you really want to grow a tree in a ( largish) container, and care for it, watering and re- potting and so forth, it’d probably be worth researching and saving up to buy a young one of a type that works well in your climate. Whether it’s a type of dwarf evergreen or deciduous or a tree- form flowering shrub.

  • 18 days ago

    Hi, here are the pic of the near maples


    1)




    2)




    3)




    4)



  • 18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    1. Is Acer pseudoplatanus. I'd call it a Sycamore but that name applies to a different tree in the US.

    2. Is not a Maple at all. It's a Plane tree, genus Platanus. If you look you'll see the leaves are arranged alternately, not opposite as on Acers.

    I'm an ignoramus on Maples but I'd guess the last two are Silver Maple. Acer saccharinum.

    sugatree thanked floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK
  • 18 days ago
    last modified: 18 days ago

    Thank you. The baby maples do not look like any of the "parents" to me, if I have to pick one, I'd go with #3, I guess. When I use Google Lens it says Acer saccharinum.

  • 18 days ago

    The leaves of seedling maples do often look different from those on mature trees. Usually far fewer lobes. I can say for certain they are not A pseudoplatanus as that is a familiar weed in my part of the world.

    sugatree thanked floral_uk z.8/9 SW UK
  • 14 days ago
    last modified: 14 days ago

    Picture #3 is most likely the parent as it is not a true silver maple but a freeman's maple. Which is a hybrid of silver and red maple used A LOT here in the states. It produces seed the can have characteristics of both silver or red maple. But the mix of the two species usually gives favorable characteristics. Your seedlings seem to fall on the acer rubrum side of the mix but time/maturity may change the leaf shape