Exclusive Video of Wright’s Jaw-Dropping Hollyhock House

Exclusive Video of Wright’s Jaw-Dropping Hollyhock House

Share this Video:
Replay Video

Exclusive Video of Wright’s Jaw-Dropping Hollyhock House

This story, originally published in 2015, has been updated with news of Hollyhock House’s UNESCO designation.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s famed Hollyhock House in Los Angeles, which reopened in 2015 after a multimillion-dollar restoration, has been described as the harbinger of California modernism. The monumental hilltop home has open multipurpose rooms and eliminates the barrier between the interior and the exterior in many places. These are features that became synonymous with California living and residential design as a whole. “It began to change the way Americans used and lived in domestic interior spaces,” says Jeffrey Herr, curator of Hollyhock House. On Sunday, July 9, 2019, UNESCO named eight works designed by Wright, including Hollyhock House, to its World Heritage List.

Comment246
Keep Watching:
Comments (246)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Julia & Elizabeth

I would love to see this house. Thanks for sharing!

98 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Angela Navarro Art

Very inspiring! Thank you for sharing! I wish modern residential architecture would get some inspiration, surely people don't need to be a millionaire to aspire to live in a beautiful house. (Lots of pretentious ugly houses in my neighborhood)

87 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
David Thorne Landscape Architect

On our must-see list, especially for its Arts & Crafts features.

73 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Sonny 62

A piece of architectural history that continues the legacy of a monumental talent that was supported by an oversized ego. And that is said with utmost admiration and respect for the talent.

90 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bebes pearls

Oh, but the views! Not knowing, I would call it a moat? which leads inside to the fireplace, (it was dry and under construction.) That was an interesting tour about 20 years ago. Very low ceilings, and I didn't understand that mausoleum look, but it could have been a shrine? I want to go back, there were features that just didn't make sense, an odd bathroom fixture for instance. I love historical tours. It's great to see the money was raised to complete the restore.

21 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
summilux

And I bet it doesn't have a white kitchen. tsk, tsk.

51 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
thatnameistaken

The handful of uninformed comments has inspired me to lend some additional information about this design so that you might appreciate it for itself as a work of art and an inspiration.

Hollyhock House is considered by some to be the forerunner of the California ranch-style house, of which you are no doubt familiar. It was designed by Mr. Wright while he was in Japan and inspired by Japanese garden houses and contains an open floor plan with rooms that flow into one another without doors (like the open-planned homes of today, maybe?). It contains an open kitchen and also what may be the first built-in entertainment center (to house a record player in this case). It's meant to be an ode to nature and geometric themes.

And, it turns out, it probably influenced the way we all like to live today: open floor plans with an emphasis on indoor/outdoor living.

575 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
summilux

Thank you- thatnameistaken. As well as an appreciation for natural materials and the role of ambient light in sculpting an interior- "In praise of Shadows".

123 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
whynottryit

I have always been amazed by Frank LLoyd Wright's work, possibly because one of his houses is in the town I grew up in. The attached pictures are from the Rosenbaum House.


167 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Sigrid

Where were the hollyhocks? Surely they could have planted some?

It doesn't look like a FLW. Was it an early work?

15 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
susanvpaige
When I think of open floor plans, I think of Mies van dear Rohe.
7 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Hope Anderson

I hadn't seen it in years and tried to go at three different times tonight, but it was jammed. (Offer something for free and everyone will come out for it, especially in Los Angeles!) Hollyhock is my favorite FLW house because of Aline Barnsdall's influence: an avid hostess, she fought for a much bigger living room and kitchen than he wanted, both of which improved the house. Btw, she only lived there a year because she found working with Wright a nightmare. The feeling was mutual, which is why FLW decamped to Japan to work on the Imperial Hotel, leaving Schindler in charge.

55 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
anneowl

I guess I must be one of the uninformed but I too found it depressing and heavy looking. Maybe it looks better in real life.

12 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
voxdoc

A little shocked at the taste level in these comments. I'm flabbergasted, to say the least. I think it's absolutely gorgeous - that mantel, that skylight, THAT DESK!

165 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
whynottryit

@Sigrid

"Construction began in 1919, but Barnsdall fired Wright from the job in 1921, citing ballooning costs as cause for dismissal. Architect Rudolph Schindler moved from Chicago to California to oversee the project’s completion." quoted from above article.

16 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tomboy007
Absolutely stunning! I have visited many FLW houses and am fascinated by his work. On my to do list when I visit LA.
30 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
natashajovic
The reason The Hollyhock House has "mausoleum" like exterior is because it was supposed to be part of arts and theatre complex that was never realized. This house and 9 more FRW projects were put on World Heritage Site designation list as one combined site (not as an individual site).
47 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
twistedstairway
FLW - an incredibly talented individual far ahead of his time.

If only architecture was more like fashion and you could parade these runway houses somewhere, so that others could reinterpret their design brilliance for normal living without having to subject the poor clients to this craziness.
25 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
arizonagal
Pure beauty. Go see it up close. Amazing.

Schindler is also a genius.
27 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
thatnameistaken

mrsstem et al.; the reference to Japanese garden houses is not my opinion. The house was designed by Mr. Wright while he was IN Japan and falling under the spell of the Japanese garden house, a style that merges indoor living with the outdoors. Influence is the key word here.

It's the same concept as bridging the gap between haute couture and ready-to-wear. You wouldn't wear the Christian Lacroix gown flaunted on the runway. But, the following season you would probably be wearing a suit or dress inspired by that gown featuring the color or fabric or line.

This house is not meant to be a suburban family home. But, it was in point of fact, the inspiration for the very design that is ubiquitous today.

118 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
38240

"inspired by Japanese garden houses"

Yeah, that right there explains why it does not appeal to me. I am just not a fan of oriental designs including architecture......................

I just can't imagine putting that much money into something like this even for restoration.


9 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Annie Smart

Lloyd Wright is of course fab and so eclectic. Look at the Marin County fairgrounds building for his version of "the Jetsons". But this LA house interior is VERY Rennie MacIntosh. Lovely.


12 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
martinmittelmark

I hear a number of people saying, "It is ugly". "It is beautiful." If I may suggest without being overly intrusive. Give up all your likes and dislikes and just let it transport you where it will. Often you will find the experience very invigorating.

124 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
nickybumps
Thank you for the information, thatnameistaken, especially the Japanese inspiration. This place is stunning. I love the fireplace & the room in the last interior photo.

I've also always loved Japanese art & architectural design, so maybe whatever works in me for one does for the other. Either way - next stop in the area, I'm going to try my best to make time to see this place. Those who find it ugly are free to argue why, but I'd be curious to see them offer a few photos what they DO like.
24 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Robert Halfpenny

Sigrid, The Hollyhocks were part of the exterior cast concrete motif. This place was hardly an early effort in that he had already done many homes and buildings all the way back to the late 1800's. The major facet of most of FLW designs were that they were every bit as much a work of art as they a building of function. Often times the artistry outweighed functionality. A prime example of this is the is the magnificent sculpture sitting in NYC, called The Guggenheim(sp) Museum. As art, it is absolutely stunning, but as an "art Museum", it is woefully lacking in fulfilling that goal.

Robert Hayes Halfpenny

42 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Steven

As an architecture historian student, I really am disappointed to see people undervalue these homes. I certainly am not a fan of Versaille's heavy Baroque styling and find the Rococo to be too busy for my tastes, but I appreciate the art, the style, and the architecture for what it attempts to do.


FLW was heavily inspired by Asian architecture, hence the long expanses of windows and the interesting roofline. Oddly enough, low ceilings are a staple in FLW's work, which is something I am personally rather critical of, as are many people evidently, but that's just how he thought homes should be: an emphasis on flatness and horizontal planes...that's just how it is. There is a language that makes a home instantly recognisable as a Frank Lloyd Wright. He DID create North American modernism, and you can't take that away from him. Just because it does not necessarily fit your style or personal preference does not give you the right to insult its designation as a world heritage site. It is a well deserved designation.

199 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Mary Marin

As cold as it is on the outside, with few windows and uninviting appearance, the inside is stunning! All that light from the central courtyard and the warmth of the oak...the exquisite design details...although completely unlike the FLW house in Grand Rapids, MI, where I live, on the outside, the interior is quite similar in design and overall feel. "Our" house is also free to tour, and one of the best restored/maintained FLW homes to visit. Check out the Meyer May house if you are passing through. http://meyermayhouse.steelcase.com/


34 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Lia Imhoff

It's called "taste" people, and it's different in each of us. It's also neither right nor wrong and cannot be argued about, as it is determined arbitrarily and capriciously. One can legitimately not like the house, but one cannot legitimately deride someone for not liking it, and being "surprised at the level of taste in these comments" is just pompous nonsense. Stop declaring your personal opinion about the house as if it was fact, because it simply isn't. It is merely your very personal reaction to FLW's very personal expression, and the majority or "learned" opinion is neither correct nor incorrect. It is just... the majority or learned opinion.

(For the record, I happen to think the house is magnificent, though admittedly a bit too dark for my taste. Happily, no one is going to force me to live there.)

132 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Raphael
Orsalia6....if my memory weren't so bad I would memorize what you wrote. What a precise description of taste and of peoples self-importance. Thank you
38 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
foley150

I live close to Falling Water. a vacation home he built for the Kaufmann family and probably his greatest achievement.

http://www.fallingwater.org/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvQZbC1OOZc

While his style of architecture is not for me, I greatly admire the man for what he accomplished.


27 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
oxford46
He was way ahead of his time, the interiors are rather heavy and clunky by today's standards but his use of space light and melding his buildings with their surrounding landscape was second to none. All buildings should be thus.
21 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
amy_davidson

For a financially bankrupt city, $4.4million could make a lot of tacos and feed the homeless

8 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
juudean
My daughter lives around the corner from the Hollyhock House and we have been waiting patiently for the completion of the restoration of this work of art! From her apartment window she also has a view of FLW's Ennis House below the Griffith Observatory. It is a behemoth...and also appears to be undergoing a renovation. Look forward to hearing about that one...an entirely different inspiration.
18 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
deana5021
I absolutely love the window placement and the effects of light and how it changes as the day progresses. Stunning A&C influence. I would love to see it!
9 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
msshaver66
Amy Davidson, the city didn't pay for it. A quick google search would have told you that. And how many tacos have you made the homeless?
64 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Kathy Dunn

Consider what most home architecture was like in pre-WWI USA...the Victorian era was just ending. This house (and many of FLW's other buildings) were a radical departure from the norm at that time. I look forward to touring the house soon.

As far as funding this renovation, the $4.3 million dollars came from the California Cultural and Historical
Endowment, the National Park Service’s Save America’s Treasures program,
and the City of Los Angeles. I don't think any of this was taking food out of the mouths of the poor!

Here are some additional pictures and articles about the house and the renovation:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/02/12/hollyhock-house_n_6664232.html

http://la.curbed.com/archives/2015/02/a_full_tour_through_frank_lloyd_wrights_first_la_house_restored_to_its_1920s_beauty.php#more

51 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
thetree
Nonsense. You cannot legitimize everyone's stupidity as "personal taste". Good taste is something that only comes through education and experience. Saying that everyone's opinion has the same value is a joke. As an analogy, if someone says they do not like fine cuisine but they love Taco Bell and Mountain Dew , they are simply wrong about food, have poor taste and should be sterilized.
Please stop coddling those with poor taste who choose to express their opinions. If you are like me and have no clue how to critique a house sized art installation, please hold your tongue until you do.
52 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ginny Johns
I lived in Pennsylvania most of my life but never got to see Falling Waters. From the photos it always appeared dark with very low ceilings. It was the way it cantilevered over the water fall that always fascinated me!
7 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Buffy Fos
Fascinating FLW work and even more fascinating comments! I always appreciate seeing examples of FLW homes, but seldom am able to imagine myself living in one, Kentuck Knob being one big exception.
5 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
magada

All those who love Taco Bell and Mountain Dew run and hide. NOW !! :D

25 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cserack

For anyone balking at the cost of renovating such a property, please don't be single minded. The long term benefit is amazing. $4.4M and 3-4 years to renovate. I could not find accurate current prices for tours, but have been to a few other FLW property tours, which have run $30-75 for basic tours, and into the hundreds for longer or private tours. Assuming a low $30 per person, 200 people per day, that cost will be recouped in only two years. That is half the time it took to do the renovation. After that, the funds may go back to those organizations who initially invested in its Renovation and that money can be used for other worthwhile projects. And the city will get some of that revenue to make tacos for the poor or decrease its debt.

33 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
shellyennis1
Just a building, not a home. Unimpressive!
4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Don Joyner
@orsalia6...thank-you for injecting a bit of the tolerance and civility that has departed so many personal engagements, even a simple exchange of views of architectural and artistic style.
19 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Arizona Snoopy
I have never understood the appeal of FLW. Maybe my eye is hopelessly plebian but I can't stand any of his work.
4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Alicia Pugh
Although it is not pleasing to the eye on the outside, inside must be breathtaking. I have been a fan of his work for many years.
2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Peggy Tupper

4.4 million bucks to restore it! Sounds like 4 million of overhead and 400K of work.

8 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Lia Imhoff

cserack, you neglected to mention the incalculable benefit of preservation to our collective humanity, education, and experience. FLW's creations are masterpieces of architecture (regardless of individual opinions about them), and preserving them for the enjoyment of us and our posterity bolsters the spirit and nourishes the soul. (in my humble opinion. :-)


46 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jezebelrocks


definitely not Frank's finest!

4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
figeroid

Fallingwater is still my favorite.

10 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Jennifer Robertson

A house of great beauty. The interior woodwork is exquisite, the colour of honey and very art- noveau. The fireplace design would be regarded as futuristic even today. To me there is a suggestion of the Inca culture in it's design.

28 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
blackmoon1
As with many FLW restorations the structure is complete, but the natural surroundings are not. A overwhelming theme in Wrights work was the interplay between what was considered inside and outside, he strove to blur those lines. For those who find this restoration harsh & cold I would encourage you to see the photos of the house a few years after it was complete, or a few years from now, when the flora & fauna are more established. It is hard to imagine what he envisioned for the residents without this.
21 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
texasblond

As for the low ceilings, when we recently toured Falling Water, we were told that FLW was a short man who didn't care for tall people, and that is why he often had low ceilings in the homes he designed. I'm 6' tall and felt claustrophobic in some of the bedrooms; my husband, 6'5", couldn't stand up straight in a couple of rooms!

11 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jim_ruggieri

An interesting layout - however, has the charm of a funeral parlor.


5 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
nancyferro

Not a fan at all. Too rigid, too many sharp lines. I've never been a fan of FLW. I like soft, flowing lines.

4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
beverleyc

I find (as do many) FLW homes far too dark inside. I need the light to pour into my home.

7 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jjcreech
56 years after his death and Mr Write's work is still creating controversy. I think he would love it.
48 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Tricia Jones

"Many architects consider it the world's first modern building, because of its unique construction of only one material: reinforced concrete. This would become a hallmark of the modernists who followed Wright, such as Mies van der Rohe, and even some post-modernists, such as Frank Gehry." Quote stolen from Wikipedia. Personally,I think he build in concrete so the structure would last forever. He was building monuments to himself. Personally, I love his stylized furniture and the houses and all the wood.

14 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
modlodgeluv
This house is architectural haute couture

And one can only begin to imagine the genius it represents when understood in the context of the time when it was first designed and built

- clearly 21st-century perspectives are still challenged (as the comments evidence) -

picture for instance the (early seasons/WW1) downton abbey characters witnessing something like this being built....
30 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Susan Salvo
I have enjoyed every single comment in this thread. FLW continues to stir our hearts and emotions even in death.
30 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
nancyferro

I totally agree with you beverlyc!! Let the sun shine in!!!

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
vegasrenie

Frank Lloyd Wright's homes are not *homes* per se, but works of art. And just like every style of art, there are both fans and detractors. I can understand why some people don't like the style and can understand why others love it. I happen to be a fan; in fact, the first thing I thought was how could I possibly get a fireplace like that in my own home. (not gonna happen, but you understand). I dislike most abstract art yet I'm a fan of Picasso. I have a friend whose opinion of Picasso is unprintable. From the first FLW house I saw (Falling Water), I've been a fan. This particular home - except for the fireplace - is my least favorite so far, but I can still see his unmistakeable stamp in its style. So I enjoy it for what it is. YMMV

23 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Aspen Carpet Designs Inc. - Rug Design Studio

FLLW was in an interesting phase for his homes in LA. He had wound down from his Prairie School phase of the Midwest. A client had moved to LA and asked him to a design home there. A confluence of factors pushed him to the use of concrete and the style form of the homes. He kept his open flowing interiors of the Prairie designs, and then seemed to integrate both the Mexican block built temples and the Japanese structures. His mix of woods, concrete and glass for the interiors was very different from other home construction of the time. His use of those materials brought about the same polar feelings among people of that time too.












50 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
haughliz
Classic FLW!
4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mrsstem
Beautiful...a traditional Japanese home is integrated into its garden. Water is always a feature. Moss gardens are fondly cultivated. There is softness, an organic feel to it...wood, paper, stone, glass, metal. The concept of shibui, unobtrusive beauty.
23 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
wl606

The low ceilings are less because he didn't like tall people (that standard snark is just to tittilate the crowds; the only decent tour I ever got at Fallingwater was by an architecture student, not a guide with a ready script), but because he thought homes should be of human scale. And yes, I'd recommend that people look at other homes built at the time, and you'll realize just how visionary FLW was.


22 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
eileennj45
An interesting article and even more interesting are the comments. Clearly FLW sparks very intense, opposite reactions. I know very little about architecture, but I've always loved the exteriors of his buildings, while the interiors baffle me. But isn't that what art is? Something that moves you, even if others don't understand why?
17 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
swkaiser

I've toured several Wright homes. He was a master at capturing natural light and his homes were not windowless. Look at the pictures above, there are many windows but they are placed for a reason, not just design. The low ceilings have purpose. In the winter it is easy and economical to heat the rooms and in the summer, windows were placed to create natural breezes throughout. The room design, the block work, the richness of the woods all create a feeling of coziness in his homes, very much unlike the sterile modern homes of today (in my opinion). Every one of his designs were created for it's individual use and for the site on which it was built. However, It is true that Wright was a temperamental artist. I look at his designs as a piece of art and realize that no one likes the same artist. Two people can have extremely opposing reactions to a painting, so why not a house.


38 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tgreg646

For those who are critical of the cost of restoration: are you saying that the poor are incapable of inspiration, or that they cannot feel the uplift of a fine work of art? While the poor are likely oppressed by the burden of making ends meet, they are in need of the 'lightness of being' the art provides, perhaps even more than those of us who are burdened by negative critiques of the taste of others.

22 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
awfergie
There are too many people subscribe to HGTV and just don't realize its origins. There's nothing negative to say about this house it's the original arts and crafts movement it's pure genius saying you don't like it is like saying that you don't like Picasso
7 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
A Kitchen That Works LLC

As many LA neighborhoods are experiencing destruction (a downside to a recovering economy), it is nice to see this level of preservation. Heading to LA in the fall, this will definitely be on my to do list. Thanks for posting.

9 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gibbedittome

I would have liked to have known more history about the homes decline over the years and of its neglect and why that abandonment happened. Then show me an original black and white picture of it right after its completion in those early days. Then hit my inquisitive eyes with "BEFORE RENOVATION" pictures so I can see how desperately this home needed its repair. Then grace my fascinated eyes with the finished product of our current day. Now THAT would be a visual history lesson and a small feast for curious eyes.

14 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
garycin
I grew up in Barnsdall, Oklahoma. FLW designed the Price tower in neighboring Bartlesville, OK. There are NO square rooms, all are triangles. The exterior is copper. It is an interesting work of art. As a child I visited a Dr. In that building. My children have stayed in the suites. Tiny rooms, tiny elevators. You can now tour and stay in the Price Tower. I encourage everyone who loves his work to put it on their list of must sees.
15 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bmr4

Boring, so devoid of color!

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
whynottryit

Devoid of color? exactly what color is it that should have been there? I see oranges, greens, the variations in the concrete and wood, sunshine, shadows, what more could you want?

33 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sthgir
I would move in in a minute! Absolutely beautiful.
10 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Adele Kieser

My husband in a concrete contractor and we have built a concrete and glass house. Very difficult as there is no room for error. No moving things that are in the wrong place once the concrete is cast. FLW was a visionary and a perfectionist. Far ahead of his time. Whether it is your preference or not his work demands respect. Goodness knows what the people who find it depressing and ugly would think of Brutalist architecture, they would slit their wrists...

29 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
maximista

This is beyond ugly.

5 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
hattieli

I think it's wonderful, however each to it's on

5 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Cindy Compton
Thank you "thatnameistaken" for your comment. I too am surprised at how quickly people respond in a negative manner when they don't like or fully understand the subject they are responding to.
Either you like Franklin Lloyd Wright or you don't. I personally think his architectural style is pure genius! Thank goodness he had the vision to take us out of the stuffiness of Victorian habitat. His style is timeless.
Before anyone remarks on my last statement there are many aspects of Victorian architecture that I love.
Wright rocks!!
30 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
hattieli

and you know if offered the home they would move right in and not change one thing. LOL

4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mrsstem
I don't think disliking Hollyhock house is a matter of ignorance. I just think nothing about a concrete structure as heavy as this, is reflective of japanese aesthetic or pretty.
Taliesin was where wright "got it".
6 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gregn66
I can't believe the negative comments about this awesome price of work. it is a great architectural icon by the greatest architect of all time!
7 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mtsnutritionist

Regardless of the structural and architectural significance, it's a shame there was no social consciousness considered with regard to the landscaping. California is in the 4th year of a record-setting drought, the Sierra snowpack is again well-below normal with temperatures well-above normal. A wind-driven wildfire just destroyed 40 homes in the eastern Sierra in an area that normally has at least a few feet of snow this time of year. LA and much of SoCal gets its water from the Sierras, but as a collective they still don't "get it."

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Laini Henry-Cano
I would take Wright's genius ego over Hollywood narcissism any day.
13 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
arteshouse

I love FLW's work and welcome every opportunity to view his structures. There is lot to learn about the vision and style of his body of work. He is a important modern architect and I for one appreciate learning more.

4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
armorsteelco

Inspiration for a '70's sci fi movie set!

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
catejon

The pictures attached do not show the HOLLYHOCKS (design) that are cut into the stone fence outside and in the backs of the inside fabulous chairs., as well as other places. You have to BE there to appreciate it. I also attempted to go on the opening as I have not been there for years, but it was jammed! Will go in the next week to once again, enjoy it, since I live in the area. Some of the walls slant to the center of the ceiling and the bottom of pictures hang OFF the walls to keep them from being damaged. LOW ceilings, but people were shorter then?


6 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
beckyastorps
I'm a huge FLW fan. I'm fortunate to live about a block away from another one of his homes in LA (which is spectacularly beautiful and magical). I'm also fortunate to be able to regularly attend events at the Hollycock House, such as outdoor movie nights and various art events. I can't wait to tour inside Hollycock.

Having said that, I had an interesting thought while looking at the pics. To me, in my opinion, it's an ugly house, particularly on the outside. Imagine if this house was built next yours today AND by some no-name architect.... I can almost guarantee that you would be thinking about putting your house on the market.

It seems to me, that many of those offering positive comments are thinking about the historical significance of the house and it's architect without actually responding to the house. Many of those offering negative comments are doing the opposite. Like some others, I'm taking into account the historical significance and still think it's an ugly house. BTW, I have "taste" and know quite about architecture and renovating. And I still STILL find it ugly!
7 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
whynottryit

I too am amazed at the lack of appreciation of Wright's achievements. I've admired is work for decades. Do I want to live in any of the houses he built? Probably not but his pioneering in architecture that brought homes out of the Victorian era puts him in a class by himself. I find it so limiting to put art of any kind in a single box. I love Salvador Dali, Monet, Toulouse-Lautrec, and Matisse. I'm not a fan of the styles of Rembrandt or Andy Warhol but I appreciate and admire the work and the contribution they made to the art world. Many will gasp and wring their hands because I said I didn't care for Rembrant's work. How is this possible? Because I can respect the artist without feeling that I have to love the art they produce. I don't care for "realism" in general. I don't like bowls of fruit or still life in pretty much any form but that doesn't make me not appreciate the play with lights and shadows and colors in the work itself. Many times, a true work of art takes not just a second look but many second looks to understand the skill of the artist and the emotion and passion he has for his work. I think that's what many are missing with FLW. It's harder to see passion in concrete than on a canvas.

23 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
hattieli

We have one of his houses where i live and it is beautiful it's now on the national registry, ireally love all of his designs all over the country, please give me one of his houses, and i will move right on in

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
nnnnancy
I am so disappointed.
I read the comments here and I think I am reading my local online newspaper comment section.
Let's please stop inserting the critical comments.
11 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Amy

I can appreciate the style, architecture and design of the home; but, for some reason FLWs LA homes read Mayan to me.. and dare I say it, I cracked a sideways smile when I found myself thinking of "Alien vs. Predator" :)

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
casavenado

Got a private tour last week - also toured the other FLW homes like Ennis House and Millard House. Say what you want but no one else had his vision. Once you walk around, sit down, etc you are in another world. Photos don't capture that feeling.

20 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
casavenado

Couldn't help but notice that the Game of Thrones set is modeled after the concrete blocks of FLW

11 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
casavenado

Game of thrones set


4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
nitpicker

There seem to be many experts here on FLW. Perhaps someone can make or bust these myths about the architect. I've carried some of these around for over thirty years after touring various FLW places.

1. FLW was 5'7" and thought that anyone over that height was not worth architectural consideration (Example low doors and ceilings).

2. FLW hated guests. So much so he built swimming pools a (not sloped)consistent 8 foot deep.

3. Owners of FLW homes often had to scramble to get out of sight their own furniture and place furniture designed by him to their exact placements to avoid being dressed down when he visited.

4. He was deeply affected by the death of his family by fire and built afterwards using materials that were "fireproof" (stone and steel).

4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
shootsleft
I would also like to comment on the uninformed comments previously posted. Only because I was an uninformed person dragged to frank Lloyd wright's personal home in Chicago and some of his other works/residences. I came away saying only "wow! To think I almost missed this experience." I also came away with a new appreciation of architecture. Yes, FLW's work is that great. Definitely worth a trip and thanks for sharing.
14 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
g1bradfield
For those of you who are upset by the cost of the renovation, ask yourselves "How many jobs did this provide the economy?" Don't stop at the people on the job site. Be sure to include the people who put together the materials all of the way back to harvesting the trees to mining the ores needed for the job. Then ask yourselves about the jobs this will bring to the neighborhood on an ongoing basis. Jobs are far more important than feeding people as you provide them with the means to feed themselves.

As to whether it is beautiful or ugly, that is immaterial. It is history. A lot of our history is very ugly. Wars, genocide and slavery, just to name a few, are very ugly, but that shouldn't stop us from recognizing the good things that came out of them. FLW changed architecture. He was very ahead of his time in a lot of ways. Celebrate his visionary thinking and how it changed the choices that you now have for your homes. Take what you want from his ideas and leave the rest.
26 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Margery

By far the best of Houzz to date! Wonderful discussion by some real experts and interested, knowledgeable individuals. The evolution of design can get so complex as one builds on another to become something very different. My college background was 1948-1952 with much following and a continuous interest. Can say I'm knowledgeable but not a expert! Informed enough to qualify to enter this great conversation. I learned to understand and appreciate each and every 'style' to use the broad term, but will NEVER really like Craftsman even though I can like facets of it. I do not like 'control freaks' thus dislike a 'style' that demands this or that must follow. In my own mind, I think the idea of 'enough already' is what initiates the evolution of most changes, development of new directions. I LOVE the flow of Art Neauveau but it became excessive to the point where it went as far as it could go and like other 'styles', it became too controlling, demanding. personally I like being able to combine different periods into one that reflects MY style.

Eclecticedwardian, I do not understand your remark re Arts and Crafts style is dead? Here in SW Alabama and elsewhere I am seeing a huge number of houses being built in that style quite faithfully in fact right along with 'Colonial' ones, all reproductions which agrees with Terry's comment re 'myopic architects' and uninformed customers unaware of their options and what their money CAN buy.

Terry, your furniture is amazing! That desk actually makes me almost LIKE craftsman style! I will never like Stickley though I can understand where he was going. I am grateful that I have lived during such a long and varied period. Especially glad to have been raised in Cincinnati, a mecca of Art Deco buildings and to have had the opportunities to tour so many great houses/buildings and to have met so many important designers and artists from the 50s to the present and to have had a long connection with a major art museum.

8 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Corliss Cogan
@Casavenado Game of Thrones and FLW both share similar aspects of ancient unexplained precision structures, Puma Punktu as one, that cannot be replicated today even with the most sophisticated tools of our time.
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Shannon Connelly
Not a favorite FLW, but glad to hear it is being preserved as inspiration to new a generation.
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Connie Derhak
This home would not be for me , I like a home that is warm and inviting.
   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Laura Seasongood
I used to rehearse at Barnsdall for some summer performances with Will Geer Theatricum Botanicum - at the time Hollyhock was closed. Always wanted to see it!
   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Brian Fox
Much of the negative and critical remarks here are the EXACT comments that met Mr. Wright and his works 100+ years ago! Heaped on top of that, Mr. Wright led a scandalously immoral life which only exponentially compounded the tongue-wagging of his day. Be that as it may, architectural historians all agree that in his day, Frank Lloyd Wright propelled residential, commercial, and public building architecture, as well as interior and furniture design, forward by light years. He was and remains the master of light, space, shape, and design in all that he touched throughout the many stages and periods of his professional career. His works were not intended for everyone, but it is worth anyone's time to study the man and his many contributions to art and design, which have been the source of much inspiration to many.

Having visited numerous FLW buildings, I find many, many common elements of design style when comparing Hollyhock with Mr. Wright's personal residence and studios, Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Arizona.
9 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gedh

greggn66, "the greatest architect of all time"? Somewhat of a sweeping statement, surely? A very important 20thC American visionary architect certainly, but remember that there are countries other than the Unites States and architecture before the 20th century! You give me your FLW and I'll raise you Sir Christopher Wren (1632-1723), architect of 52 London churches, and John Nash (1752–1835), architect of much of Georgian London!


9 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gregmedina

Living just minutes from his Taliesin in Wisconsin, I have come to be as familiar as any layperson can be with a man whose personal characteristics and life are as enigmatc and prickly as his architectural "remains". And aside from any personal feelings one might have about a particular FLW "phase" or specific construction, a few facts about him and his architectural legacy remain irrefutable.

1. He took "American" architecture from the fussy, Victorian indulgence of froo-froo and Painted Lady gaudiness to a revolutionary motif of flowing lines and often-harsh, glaring geometry AND asymetry that reached out to nature and (for lack of better words)...a sense (or nonsense) of spaces as love-affairs of volume, sensual relations to each other and use of light and natural elements to envelope the soul of the very structure.

2. No one will ever accuse him of living a life that made any sense...he abandoned his wife and children leaving them to live in horrific poverty and to walk barefoot in the harsh midwestern winters on empty stomachs...AND that colossal lack of human connection to the reality of others is ALSO a consistent theme in his "relationships" with his clients, be they American nouveau-riche, faux-patricians (like his builds in Evanston, IL) or in his soaring flights of fancy throughout the US and that includes THIS build. Frank was not given to building decorative temples to the egos of his clients...his chorus of muses included only one entity...HIS ego...like it or not.

3. Frank, his selfish indulgences and his often cruel personal life or his architectural work may or may not be to the taste of contemporary Americans, but he was nothing if not a uber-rude trajectory into the future that jerked American architecture forward and to hell with anyone his rockets incinerated along the way.

4. This house is a unique testament to his "nature" if not his "talent". It is beautiful! It relates to the then-emerging west coast aesthetic of sun, sky and self-worship. Frank always was convinced only HE knew well how to build for a specific climate and geological culture, even if the structure froze and cracked in the American tundra or fried itself in the endless sunlight of the Southwest. There was nothing "common" about him and most of all about his "sense" of being or building and this house reflects this.

19 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Mary Leonard
Wow, igniting a fire storm of comments. Good or bad, FLW was awesomely able to cause controversy. This interest in design has been inspirational!
4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
davsay
I'm not a big fan of FLW but the interiors that are pictured here are really stunning. It's probably the way the light plays off the walls and furniture. Anyone who can design and build every aspect of a home,
commercial building, garage or whatever and have a jaw dropping wow affect on people, deserves all the respect and admiration that I can muster.
5 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
goodewyfe

It does look like a mausoleum. While I had heard he was a difficult person, I was not aware that he abandoned his family to live in abject poverty. If you knew that about an architect, would you hire him to design your home?

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
JWPH Architecture
Photographs do not do FLLW homes justice, I learn this when I visited his personal home in Oak Park , IL.
I would love to see this house in person.
I know it would not be for everyone and even though he controlled everything he designed, he designed the homes to fit the client or persons who will use the space.
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
whynottryit

I have a feeling that if we knew intimate details of any great artist's personal life, we would approve of none of them and yet, we can still admire their work. Dali and Van Gogh were by no means models of virtue, yet they are revered in their field. The angst of their personality is often the genius of their work.

7 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Harmon Stevens
They should put in a swimming pool where that courtyard lawn is.
   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
the_old_battleaxe

Every great architect is - necessarily - a great poet. He must be a great original interpreter of his time, his day, his age. - Frank Lloyd Wright

I thoroughly recommend the following titles, not just for those who are already "in the know" but for those who truly would like some insights into this great architect's thought processes.

Magnificent Obsession, Frank Lloyd Wright's Buildings and Legacy in Japan, 2007, pub.: Facets Video

Wrightscapes: Frank Lloyd Wright's Landscape Designs, by Charles and Berdeana Aguar, pub.: McGraw Hill

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
devlincolleen

I'm nearly speechless reading so many of the negative responses here. The house reminds me of Wright's very gorgeous Unity Temple in Oak Park, Illinois. http://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/unity/unity.html

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
greenvalleydesign

Thank you for writing this wonderful article, and posting the lovely photos. As a Chicago native I had seen Mr. Wright's buildings in Oak Park, Illinois and his Yesteryear in Kankakee, Illinois. I did get to see the Guggenheim in New York, so different from the Chicago area buildings, and a marvelous modern piece. I was not familiar with the Hollyhock house, another building that is different yet and also beautiful. It makes me really appreciate the architect's versatility even more. Thanks again for supplementing my education.


8 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
stilllearning1

I too was never a FLW fan. That is until I actually toured a FLW house. And that changed everything. The home felt comfortable. The home flowed. It was a space you felt you could live in. No, it is not my personal style but I sure would not turn one down, if offered to me.

5 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
belijoyful

Stealing from a famous quote here guys, but Frank Lloyd Wright's work is not on trial here, you are. Your opinion of his work doesn't lessen the magnanimous contribution he made to modern architecture. The jury has already returned a verdict on this one.

21 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cajunpatriot

I am always interested in seeing the work of this American genius.

I tend to like older, more traditional homes, but that is my taste, but I really appreciate this man's genius so much. Architecture in my area tends to be more gothic or Roman, though there is also rustic Cajun/creole, which my father used in constructing his last home.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Rhoni

Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Like it or not Frank Lloyd Wright was indeed a visionary, way ahead of his time. This house was built for a client, I can only guess she had some input in the design, albeit it might be why is was truly dismissed from the building. Stop and think it was built starting in 1919, then compare it to other homes of the same time. No comparison. If you are one of those people that can stand on a sidewalk and your eye is drawn to the details in the stone work, you might be an architect. Or you might just be one of those people, like myself, that truly appreciates the building genouis that is not seen today.

5 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
fordmcfall

As for the low ceilings...FLW was a master at compressing and expanding space. An example: a low ceiling in the entryway gives way to a large living space open to the outdoors. It makes a person want to move through the compressed space into the grand expanse beyond.

9 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Margery

I disagree with James Howard's statement that FLW designed houses to fit his client's needs. Wright designed houses for himself, for clients who wanted to impress others with their need to be identified by their Wright house. Their own personality and comfort were of no concern to FLW. You WILL sleep in this tiny bedroom with just a bed. You WILL use MY special shade of RED. You will have a narrow, minimal hallway (they're a waste of space) and you WILL NOT bring a stick of your own furniture into the purity of this house. But you are tall? Bend over. I too am tall, get used to it. FLW's own enormous ego dictated what was right for any house he designed and his clients WOULD obey his dictates. Yes, he was a genius and his designs changed how the world looked at housing but often such genius is 'strange' and unorthodox. Very ego driven.

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mrsstem
Sorry, but...
No judge, no jury is appropriate for anyone or anything here. Some people like his work, some do not. It is a matter of personal opinion, much as one person might enjoy baroque music, and another find it un appealing.
Lighten up people. He was an architect...no more, no less. Put his pants on one leg at a time...just like everyone else. Some enjoy his work, others do not. No person's opinion has more value than those of others.
:) Peace
15 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Jen
If you don't like it - don't look at it. With those of us that have an over all appreciation of architecture in general (ie: we don't necessarily love all of it or want our personal home built that way.) we like to see all different types of architecture. It is an art...I enjoy seeing all different kinds.
If you don't like it, you do not need to comment on it. The age old adage "if you have nothing nice to say, don't say anything at all" rings so true.
Thank you Houzz for all the eclectic styles interior & exterior that are freely shared with the general public.
12 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mrsstem
Wow. Seriously? No one should be allowed to express an opinion about an object unless it is a compliment?
Mind you, we aren't talking about personal attacks, which are another thing entirely.
12 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
whynottryit

I agree with the idea of "speak no evil" but I don't think that means "no disagreement"; rather that disagreements should be expressed with knowledge of the subject and respect for the opinions of others. I personally like FLW's designs so I'm not coming from a negative space regarding his work. I think to disregard his work simply because of his personality is at best, a limited way of thinking. Why do we hold this artist to higher standards than current Hollywood celebrities? We have no problems attending movies starring actors with questionable personal lives so why is this artist held to a higher standard? I think a critique of his work is more appropriate than one of his personal life.

14 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
joymakon
beautiful photography, addes an important element to this story
3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Sigrid

Criticism is important to understanding. Okay, so many of us aren't architects or professional critics, but I find it's worth reading amateur criticism because it helps me articulate what I think. After reading that the house looks like a mausoleum (a sentiment I agreed with) I realized there was to much solid mass --- very different from, say, Falling Waters.

Further, while FLW was a genius, it doesn't mean every one of his houses was a success. Looking at how his ideas translated into a house that strikes more than one viewer as a mausoleum can be as helpful as studying why everything worked in Falling Waters.

4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
twistedstairway

By all means compare architecture to art, but the halfway house would be sculpture. And then furniture making. Fashion has closer parallels.

Clothes serve a basic human need, but runway fashion relegates the human body to a clothes rack in order to serve art. Function re-defined as winter, summer and spring collections. Runway houses - function re-defined as site and context. In the continuum of art to tract housing, is there space for architecture that serves people? Bjarke Ingels is coming to a New York street near you.

Wright was a rare talent, creator of a transition point. Important to preserve, appreciate and study his vision. His legacy demands respect.

5 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
gregoryschmedly

That fireplace is the greatest thing I have ever seen!

8 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
projectrestore

We were fortunate to be a part of this project. If you would like to see some project photos, as well as some "before" photos, go to http://projectrestore.lacity.org/html/media.htm

We also have a facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Project-Restore/278612558856145

10 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Eron Johnson Antiques

That is amazing!


1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
deniseking99
I remember visiting the grounds when they were nearly in ruins about 15 yrs ago. I'm glad the place has been restored. I wonder if the surrounding neighborhood is still less than desirable?
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jeannemuhlestein
Be sure to see
   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Margaret

Japanese garden houses are often arranged around a courtyard with outer walls protecting them from the neighbors. On the courtyard side the building is open to the garden with many windows and doors. This can be beautiful and it can be used to create a private oasis of nature in a dense urban neighborhood. If this is what FLW was doing then that would explain why those of you who have visited the house think it's gorgeous, and those looking at the photo of the front door are pretty unimpressed. In the US and on Houzz the front facade is an important aspect of the house and the primary determinate of the house style and public reaction. I have a book of photos of Japanese garden houses. I don't think that book has a single photo of a front door.

4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
leslie
I visited this home on the 2nd day of the reopening. While it is dark and spare, I was stuck by how many design elements are used in homes today from the open multi use great room to the fireplace focal point to the wall of glass doors that blur the line of indoor/outdoor spaces. Along with his contemporaries, his influence is incalculable. Without these visionaries, we would still be living in compartmentalized Victorian homes.
5 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Susan Brune
I love Frank Loyd Wright. This home in Particular causes me to question it's beauty at first. Than I see the mastery of lighting and detail and I am once again smitten.
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
casacerro

I was in Hollyhock house in 1965, for an art award, when Barnsdall was the only name associated with the house. But the minute I walked in I knew it was a FLW, even though it was in disrepair. As I remember it had been cut up into smaller rooms. Next time I am in LA it will be on my list to see, as FLW was a unique part of architecture in America, and I personally love it.

4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Bonnie Kane

Civil or uncivil, these comments starkly represent an enduring truth about Wright's work. Decades after his death no one can be neutral about his designs! Perhaps that is why he was such an important architect and designer. I think that Wright would have enjoyed the discussion here. Like his work or hate it, we can agree that it had tremendous influence. If one does not value art and design, then to that person the money spent to preserve Hollyhock House was wasted. But do we, today, have the right to deny future generations the opportunity to see it themselves regardless of whether they judge it to be beautiful or ugly?

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mkprizwan

Sure the outside is ...ahhh...interesting but the interior is awe inspiring - I would very much like to visit.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Continents Apart Lifestyles

FLW's brilliance never grows tiresome.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Pestov Lev
Cool!
   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Halo Harris

Unbelievable. A neighbor had his home built by Frank Lloyd Wright. Simply timeless elegance. I am speechless.

4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cypress

Another masterpiece by the genius, FLW! Love, love, love!

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
samanthaja

Ha ha--I clicked on this story because I knew the comments would be a good read…and they did not disappoint! Anything FLW really gets people riled up. I will keep my own opinions to myself, as I can offer nothing new.

4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Charles A Phillips, III

Visited the Hollyhock House in the early 90's. The grounds had hollyhock flowers in bloom. The architecture and full flowers complemented each other and by experiencing the two together, one can almost get an insight into FLW's creative mind. Hope to visit again now that it has been restored.

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jane122653

Magnificient! Ah the chairs, my favorite, the backbone, imaginative, love how the entry closes in on you, and the cement, wow FLW had a vision of understanding earthquakes and water scarcity in the area, and capturing the western light. The house is a perfect example of what an artist can do when money is no object. Sure wish I could design and decorate with not a care in the world about money!!! Double WOW, a dream come true.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
hetherfether

i am always speechless and inspired when experiencing wright's work. not just architecture, but pure art, ideas and details few others could imagine. though much of his furniture seems as if it would be uncomfortable, it was designed as part of the whole experience for his clients. wright as genius? most certainly, but quite the scoundrel, too! i'm very grateful that hollyhock has been restored and look forward to touring it soon.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
soshiny

It moves me.

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jocasstano

Every time I see this house, I feel in Uxmal and Chichenitza. Many of the details of the facades are just copy-paste from those ruins. Great house indeed.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tyletto

I believe the compound is in part homage to native adobe architecture. The sun radiates on the thick stone, brick, adobe or concrete walls during the day but it remains cool inside. At night the thick walls distribute the heat when the temperature drops. With 12 inch thick walls this cycle happens on a 12 hour cycle [if memory serves me]. Before air conditioning the sun needed to be blocked. Too many windows in direct light would spoil the physics necessary to maintain comfort. Native Americans understood this quite well. The design elements remind me of Aztec design also Native American.

The house was meant to give the impression of a theater, stadium or temple. The owner intended to entertain and that was the feeling she probably wanted her guests to have as they arrived. I would have had that feeling with a strong beating heart to boot. Wright was not building for ordinary people. You can't compare it to the cute Cape Cod down the street.

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Maryanne Pescatore

What a beautiful example of the pioneering genius of Frank Lloyd Wright! The house appears to have simple lines, but is, in fact, deceptively complex. In addition, while being "modern", it evokes warmth and serenity. A most worthwhile restoration project! Thank you for the tour and narrative of this beautiful landmark.

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
normpo

Oh Jesus, I hope it doesn't leak! Yes, it was nice. Something about it though? It was lacking something? I know what it is! It lacked that "Lived in look." For the sake of improvement, I suppose I could move in and help the place out! It's an absolutely spectacular experience! I'd move in at night when it was dark and go right to bed. I'd set my alarm to go off right before sunrise so I could watch it all come alive around me. I'd wander from room to room in awe, alone, so nothing could distract me. The views were incredible. The place is a living piece of art. The restoration was done perfectly. Houzz did a wonderful presentation as well. Thank you for the tour. Great job to all involved.

4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
K.O.H. Construction Corporation

spectacular, thank you

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
annieloca

FLW Hollyhock leaves me in awe, it feels like a public building from outside, a temple if you will; and the interior (I find) is warm, conforting because of the ceiling height and the natural materials. The beauty and the feeling of peace it gives comes from the measured and orderly design. The genius of the man is undeniable.

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
shellstones

Thank you for a great video. Loved the time lapse movement of light across

the interiors.

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cydstuff
Hahahahaha!
This commentary is wonderful, so many diverse opinions and ideas.
You guys are ALL amazing, so much so I'd like to host a cocktail party with a FLW theme and wander around listening to everyone.
My 92 year old Mother in law (who I adore) often says " your opinion is your own, you do not have to share it". I disagree (grin)' I found this string stimulating, informative and enlightening.

At one time I thought FLW and Picasso were repulsive, modern architecture boring and Victorian 'froo froo' extraordinarily skilled and beautiful, but as I matured I began to appreciate other styles, designs and concepts.

Personal taste is so subjective, isn't it fun to have a forum to discuss and learn from one another?

Let's make a date to all meet at Hollyhock house next year, tour it together then have a party on the grounds to discuss FLW and all his flaws and follies LOL!
5 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Mikko
beautiful
   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Mary Lee

lovely, inspiring now as it was then. On my list to see, Thank you for this article

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
alwaysdesigning

get rid of the music, pleeezzzze

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Karen Krickhahn Wambolt

Thank you so much for sharing this video! I am a huge FLW fan and have visited many of his works in the US. Had no idea that this one was now open to the public. Definitely on my "Must See" list. What a great way to start my day watching this beautiful video. Thanks again!

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
presleyesq

Love it! A little depressing though ... to realize that I could work all my life and never live in something so spectacular. Still, thanks for sharing this beautiful place.

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Jonathan S. Foster, R.A. LEED AP.

Fantastic...I visited in 1979 and was so disappointed...This restoration is magnificent. Thanks

   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mcook925

Am I the only one that sees a 20th century Ankhor Wat?


4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Liz Stewart

AMAZING, everytime I see this house!


   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Sharon Barnard

So Interesting..demands restoration. I'm totally in awe of the sculptural piece(mantel) above the fireplace..what a treasure.

   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
judymchartrand

I have no doubt that Wright's work is ingenious, but it is true as others have commented, most of his homes are somewhat depressing, maybe because there is "too much" wood which gives a darker atmosphere to the interior, as well as the exterior most often. Of all the Wright homes I have seen, I find the Hollyhock House the most pleasant, because it has a brighter interior, and I love the exterior of this home as well, but I wasn't fond of the "spinal back chairs" I felt the style was a bit sinister. Whether you love Wright's style or not, his architecture is superb.

   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
loniluna

Fabulous....sadly the individual who did not think this property was worthy of being a UNESCO World Heritage site has not done the research. Check out the definition before spewing your nasty opinion on the rest of us!

   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
pafusco

I am am an admirer of Mr. Wright's work. Though this is not my favorite work of his, I do like the interior play of light and the beautiful windows and skylights. This looks more like a temple to me, rather than a mausoleum. We don't all like the same things, and isn't that what makes life interesting? Doesn't mean we have to disparage another's opinion if they don't agree with ours. Nothing like a lively discussion of differing opinions to open one to different points of view. Very healthy. Keep it up!

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jacquelineh

I visited this house in May and it was astounding! Full of light and detail, it gave off a beautiful golden glow. The sight lines from the windows were lovely too. A subdued, calm opulence. Wonderful volunteers stood throughout the house answering questions and telling stories about the personalities involved in its' history.

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Vee

I can appreciate the various comments and critiques- as this is unususal and would stir up all sorts of ideas. But, that said, to me: a house is a home, reflecting nature and incorporating it. A house should inspire comfort, refuge and emotional ties meaning warm blankets and hot food and rest. Your favorite displays of precious things and a table to sit at with loved ones and a porch chair for you and your dog. . I find this place so overly wrought, tomblike and cold. Nothing loving about it. It seems like a pompous show-off kind of place. Just what I think. I cannot imagine feeling comfortable here or nurtured. It makes me feel nervous.

   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
klocke55

It's okay but not one of Wright's best in my opinion. And while I appreciate the bark used in the landscaping, it's a far cry from what I would've done. How about some cactus and rock to offset the bark?

   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
nancy whitehead

It really saddens me personally how really misunderstood Frank LLoyd Wright is today. If you were considered luckly enough to receive an appentiship with him at his famous School of Architecture located next to his home at Talison West you had to camp out in a special tent in the desert along with doing constant battle with hostile rattlesnakes who live there among you and consider his students invaders in their natural habitat. There was all types of desert wildlife to contend with not just the snakes although they were the most well known to these special students who were taught by Frank's wife how to care for frequent snake bites and each student was a snake bite kit given to all students along with doctors nearby in case one needed more then a temporiary fix from the kits. Often thee snakes would find their way into his home and his wife was used to walking into their bedroom to find a ten foot rattler curled up on the couples bed laying directly in the sun. They would clamly place a call to have the snake removed from the house and taken back to the desert where it belonged. Neither of them thought much of this occurance which is main reason I refused Franks kind offer of an internship from him there during the summer months when Arizona is at it's hottest. Many of the students were grad students who considered it a rare priviledge to learn from the master himself and gladly came even during the hottest summer days along with wives and families for which i can offer no logical explanation. I have a deathly hatred of snakes in general and despite the pleadings of Frank and his wife refused all offers to come to Talisen for Summer classes even staying in their home for as I stated it did not escape it's onslaught of these deadly reptiles especially in those days. Things may have improved now if the school is still in operation I have been away from all of this for quite some time.

Hollyhock house in certain ways shows Frank's genius but at the same time goes against his main principles that homes should blend in with their surroundings. Hollyhock house stands alone as a sort of Temple out in what in those days must have been totally alone in all its glory. It bears Frank's genius all over it and all his creative touches. Frank did not build homes for the average person the majority of his homes were commissions from extremely wealthy benefactors who had staffs to care for them. As to the many cracks noted in his architecture much of that is due to the cast cement blocks he often used to get reliefs for his homes which have not stood up to time.but then Frank was not building homes that would be lasting for thousands of years He built eccentric homes built for rather eccentric people who by the stretch of anyone's imagination lasted for the most part as long as they did or not long afterword. Frank was interested in today and what was being said by the land around him today not to last like the pyramids forever. He was a genius and should be taken as such along with his work. I personally resent architects who take on the job of restoration of his many unique homes and then all seem to wish to place their personal stamp upon these original details. That is not what restoration of homes is about and they all know this as fact but their own ego's get into the way and they just have to improve upon what a genius like Frank was trying to teach them about all architecture. It saddens me they have not learned about this and what this genius was trying to teach them. I rest my case. For myself this home is a masterpiece of architectural design designed by one of the greatest architect's ever born on Earth. The world lost his genius much too early for we shall not see more Frank Lloyd Wrights any time soon again.....I grieve for humanity's great loss....Frank Lloyd built temples for our souls on Earth.......



6 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
artlaw

I've had the priviledge of visiting a number of Frank Lloyd Wright houses and each has a glint of the genius....this one is worth a trip to the West Coast which I may do right after visiting the estate in South C arolina in Nov.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Annie Larson

This is what architectural character is all about. You don't have to be wealthy or live in a mansion to benefit from FLR's concepts; with a little thought, they can be integrated into any home in small ways with big results. Hollyhock House is a masterpiece that deserved to be restored. Thank you, thank you.

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
carol1953

Frank Loyd Wright was a genius. His contribution to architecture was immense. This coming from a woman who lives in a french country home no less. I might not have wanted to live in his creations, but I appreciate all art forms.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
marsia

In my experience architecture that is built to be human scale like this is best visited in person because it is more about the feeling of walking through it and being enveloped, and can look dated or out of scale in photos. I think the attention to detail and the blending of materials and textural elements is brilliant. Will definitely go visit. Looks mind-alteringly amazing!

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Donna Gamble-Forte
I love this because it makes one feel as if you are part of some ancient and powerful civilization. Perhaps an Egyptian Queen or a Mayan princess! I enjoy having things around my house that start a conversation , in this case the house starts the conversation!
3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Daniel Cantu

It truly is an astonishing restoration. We need more preservation of all our architectural these and more contributions to our American culture . I had the privilege of operating my business out of the Heinsbergen Castle on Beverly Blvd., it was wonderful to see how much everyone who ventured into my atelier salon appreciated the preservation to the legacy of Anthony Heinsbergen, interior architect of such jems as the Biltmore Hotel, L.A. and Santa Barbara, Grauman's Chinese and others still standing.

4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Dar Eckert

Exquisite! Thank you for providing this wonderful tour of a work of art!

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mountainrideror

Wow, this house is absolutely amazing, I love everything about it, absolutely fantastic in every way. I am definitely going to go see it the next time I am in LA.

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
tindelk

Great video and makes me really want to go see the house. It is quite unique! Thanks.


   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
hurich

... It's very interesting to note that in recent times it's ignored and relegated that the FLW designs in California were based on Pre-Hispanic architecture and designs motives such as those in Mitla, Oaxaca Mexico... All throughout the Hollycock House it can readily be seen the Pre-Hispanic designs... the patio and the colonnade... the tapered walls... and the excellent handling FLW did of all those details based on the ones in Mitla, Oaxaca Mexico...

   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
hurich

... the curator mentions the indigenous California architecture... there is no such thing in California... the designs FLW did in California were based on Pre-Hispanic architecture... like Mitla, Oaxaca Mexico...

   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
bergenstein

I am shocked at the negative comments. I thought the followers of houzz would understant how inventive and free thinking this man was. One of his students, Aurther Ericson of Vancouver B.C. was one of his students and he went on to build Canada Place in the USA. Look it up. Marjorie

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Bearcubus

This is the single most hilarious thread of comments I have come across on Houzz. Folks who are dismayed and trying to educate have their heart in the right place, but at the end of the day, I would just ask for more Onion-style commentary, eg. summilux's joke complaint about how the kitchen's probably not white. That's the spirit!

Also, why no steel & black imitation van der Rohe lounger? Have the owners thought about putting in a jetted hot tub to maximize the indoor-outdoor living? Do we like the Japanese and their stuff? I think we do now. Are all the people who were 20 in the 1940s dead? Yah, so maybe a sense of space and white Elle Decor light could be improved in this house by sawing off all the busy detail and whitewashing it. Now is FLW the only egomaniacal super-architect we know? Can someone comment on why Frank Gehry gets a commission in every city in the world? Does he throw great cocktail parties? Etc.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
marlinnut

As a docent at Hollyhock House, I highly encourage you to come up and see us. Hollyhock is by design a lightning rod for controversy - it was FLW's Great California Experiment, and all experiments have failures. You will see things at Hollyhock you will never see in another house - like a moat around the fireplace and stairs leading to the roof. But you will also see things, like the wonderful open floor plan and the amazing way light plays throughout the day, that you see in every decent SoCal home build in the last 75 years. He who is afraid to fail cannot possibly succeed, and FLW will willing to fail to achieve greatness. If nothing else, come to see what it is like to step into a nearly 100-year-old time capsule from an era long gone. Whether you love or hate Hollyhock House, I guarantee you will walk away impressed ...

6 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
rochellereedsmith
Those who haven't visited the Hollyhock House in person are missing how the house is a response to its site. What appears low and dark in photos of makes the house, set high above the city on a large park space with views below, a welcome retreat from LA's relentless summer sun and heat. Keep in mind that with its mixed-use origins, the house was always intended to be a quasi-public space, not a cozy private home. A classic narcissist, FLW designed monuments to his own genius, and his works ate flawed but breath-taking. Appreciate them for what they are.
2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
James David Bryant, Architect

On the whole, it is not my favorite example of Mr Wright's work, yet in the details - the meticulous incorporation of art forms into door locks, concrete blocks, wooden chairs, leaded windows...it is certainly a collection of masterpieces - and then there is the interior experience. To look out from inside a FLLW building is - i think - to know the essence of his intentions. I think he did not care what the neighbors thought, but cared deeply about what his client experienced day-in and day-out. In deed, many of his homes have cramped, narrowed, almost claustrophobic entry ways - some even hidden - all to heighten the uplifting experience of passing through a bit of hell to get to heaven. I'm very happy to know the place has been restored with such care. hope to see it some day.

5 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Charles Kaminski Architect

Did anyone mention the importance of Rudolph Schindler in the design and building of Hollyhock House?


   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
juudean
Lovely...can't wait to see this! Just returned from a trip to Chicago where I got my FLW fix in Oak Park!
   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
loubelle123
So cold
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lindajeanne
It looks Egyptian to me. And uncomfortable.
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Angela Haynie
A little masculine/sterile,but would be a nice place for a retired single male.
   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
summer1255
Amazing architecture! I totally appreciate his talent that by today's standard is a lost art!
   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Michelle Pereira
This beautiful home reminds me of the castles/monastaries I see in Portugal with the cloisters that they have in those old buildings. To me this is a modern castle. the details in the stone glass and wood are fantastic.
2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
keiko74
House has another meaning. House is life, colours, feelings, confortable place to be with your family, friends or even alone but this is all the opposite. This building is empty of all that.
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ev70551
Hopefully ... Knowledge informs/influences opinions.
Even uninformed opinions are valid and entertaining when respectfully submitted. Really enjoyed this stream with so many knowledgable opinions!
Great article!
Fascinating structure!
2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
AW67

Watching the video gave me goosebumps to see this beauty refurbished. I saw it 25yrs ago, again when it was in disrepair and now the renovation. My favorite room was the bedroom that felt like sleeping in the trees. The concrete front doors are so finely engineered you can open them with a touch of a finger. The only thing I don't remember from past tours was the fabric covered light fixture over the dining table. There is only one FLW home in Oregon and we almost lost that to demolition in order to place a McMansion on its site.

4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Lorraine Sparago
I am always conflicted about FLW. I certainly appreciate the artistic vision and craftsmanship. But his homes are so difficult to maintain, and probably not easy to live in.
3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
LOMBARDI ASSOCIATES
The lighting treatment is phenomenal. Did FLW plan it that way, or luck out?
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
granky

I never did care for Wright's designs. I don't know, just seem they all lack heart, or, something. Just my opinion.

   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
grizzly

FLW sparks much discussion. The discussion is as important as the house to architectural thinkingl

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
saltking

Wow, love the Hollyhock House. Wow can't believe the harshness of some of the comments. Guess Frank Lloyd Wright is still cutting edge almost 100 years later. For me it helps to remember FLW homes were designed when the last of Victorian architecture was still being built which in general had small dark rooms with heavy drapes doors to keep the light out so the furnishings wouldn't fade because we did not have the color technology then that we do now. So FLW homes were bright and expansive with carefully placed windows the low ceilings were used to create a horizontal expanse and force the eye out instead of up like in Victorian homes. Also Victorians were collectors and would mix many themes in a room or house it was more about the single ornament and the collection than the entire effect of all the ornaments. So in the houses like the Hollyhock House the theme is limited to create order and continuity for the overall effect. That's why I admire Wright's designs because the thought process is modern apparently still to this day so cutting edge he not only challenged past design ideas but present ones also.

6 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Becky Harris

What a heroic restoration, this made my day. Side note: Am I nuts or did Diane Keaton play a role in the historic preservation efforts? Anyway, I thought the decision they made to keep Lloyd Wright's 1940s kitchen renovation was very interesting and wonderful, and shows how you later additions/renovations outside of the period of significance are significant themselves and part of the home's life and importance. The video was fantastic, I'm really impressed at the production, and Mr. Herr's passion for this home is absolutely contagious.

6 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Cecile Ingram

Wonderful house with beautiful integrated art. Would love to see it. Has ancient Egyptian feel. Great for a "gathering" but probably not for daily living.


1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
projectrestore

AW67 - You are correct - The fabric covered light fixture was reproduced using an old photo. The curator commissioned this work concurrent with the latest restoration project.

Becky Harris - There is no argument that Lloyd Wright's work was significant, but the project team normally would have restored the kitchen to its period of significance. The main problem was the lack of drawings and photos of the original kitchen. Because of this lack of information, the team choose to restore that room to its earliest known iteration - hence the return to the 1940s work of Lloyd Wright. This follows the Secretary of the Interior's Standards.

Hope this helps. If you would like to see some project photos, as well as some "before" photos, go to http://projectrestore.lacity.org/html/media.htm

We also have a facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Project-Restore/278612558856145

4 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
salyamkyky
Very unusual home. That is why many people feel not comfortable to live in. but, still, nice. The video by itself is grate!
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Kendra Harris
Thanks for mentioning brutalist architecture. I just looked it up. Very interesting. I believe the university campus in Burnaby, Bc, Canada is this style. I never liked it because it just accentuates our gray always raining Vancouver weather, and puts an institutional spin on it.
As for franks work. The haters need to stop and take a very good look at the details and craftsmanship. They can at least appreciate that.
2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
cabicknell

There are a variety of sites on the UNESCO list. It seems like the body of FLW's work would be appropriate. It is significant in the world of architecture as he changed the direction of buildings and building science. His designs and thoughts are something for the U.S. to cherish and preserve.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ceylon777

The house is considered "modern" because it was such a dramatic change from what was typical for the era.


But all I see on the exterior is odes to the past. Mayan temples, Southeast Asian temple ruins, ancient monoliths. Reverence, weight, permanence, tribute.


It's extraordinary. I would love to be able to visit someday!

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
lindamitchellkemp

Magnificent!

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Rebecca

I know the Japanese connection but it also looks Mayan or Incan. Is there any evidence of a nod to indigenous Americans?

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
victoran

Last time I saw the Hollyhock house was over 30 years ago and loved it. Even in disrepair it was amazing. The fact that FLW designed furniture to match the house and windows to match the furniture and everything in the house to fit was amazing.

Such a work of art ,even if you hate low ceilings and cement houses, his genius shown through. I love the child's bedroom and the bath. First time there had been connecting baths with kids rooms and the child's room had the most amazing view..like FLR really cared that the kids got a room with meaning.

I docent for another historic house in Malibu and built in 1930 had wonderful modern ideas like a bath for every bedroom, cistern to catch rain, gutters to catch rain and water the plants below with drip irrigation, fireplaces with flu to warm a second story seat, etc. Artistic architects are worth their weight in gold and even if the home they produce may not be "universally liked" or too expensive or not practical, the ideas and artistry they have created , shapes the world to come.

Thanks to all the geniuses of the architecture field! I am very grateful.

As Jesus said, the poor will be with us always, I am here only a short while. A genius architect can feed millions in the long run by what he creates and how many jobs he produces.

Jobs are what gets us out of poverty. Not handouts!

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
T B
Love this property!
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Liz Scheid
Did a trip across the border this summer to see the FLW designed Martin House in Buffalo. As said previously, one does not get a true impression of these homes from photos, it is worth paying a visit in person. What I liked or didn't like was irrelevant. It was so interesting to see FLWs work and learn about what influenced him and see how he has influenced modern architecture in so many ways, and there are parts of the house that are absolutely beautiful. The historical context of the Martin house and the story of the Martin family is fascinating too. It is worth taking the 2 hour tour. I would like to go back and visit again sometime as the renovation is ongoing.
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
TES Architects

An absolute masterpiece. It is hard to argue his influence in today's architecture.

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
skysaphire
Dream home, in every way ;)
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Intex Design and Construction

Thankful we're in LA!

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Living Horticulturally

WHat an amazing home! And a great story too. it reminds me of the monasteries in old town.

   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Josh Cornes

That is beautiful

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ness70

I suppose I can see how those who are not educated in art, design and architecture cannot see past their personal taste to appreciate a masterpiece. Such a loss for them and such a treat for us.

3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Emma Smith

That house should be named the 8th wonder of the world!

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
ilchyshynjameslouise

This is a very beautiful house incorporating as many ideas of his as he could. He was a genius in his own right. No pun intended. Just think of the freedom living in such a space. I love it.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
KWRE

It is a masterpiece! It stands alone. It incorporates many of Wright's earlier designs, use of space, and concrete It is heavy and monumental. The building does not have the feel of simplicity and elegance of many homes of the Midwest "Prairie Style". I would call it an experiment in searching for a new style.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
webone sitedesign

so inspiring and magical , thanks for sharing
طراحی سایت فروشگاه اینترنتی

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
simsamurai.com

Incredible video of a masterpiece of FLW architecture.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Monay Master Designs, LLC
The beauty and grandeur is reminiscent of the Temple of Soloman.
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Hood Herring Architecture Pllp

Outstanding video capturing the remarkable level of detail that Wright masterfully designed to.

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Richard Walker

I just love the way Houzz does these videos. The narration, the imagery and the MUSIC. So awesome. I can't wait to check out this masterpiece for myself in the coming months! So pretty. And love FLW and all of his architecture.

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
AW67
I visited the hollyhock house in the 80s and again a few years ago when it was in decline. I was heartbroken to see the neglect. It looks like the much needed renovation brought it back to its original beauty. Two things that left an impression on me were the massive concrete juggernaut entry doors that were engineered so well you could open them with a touch of the finger, and a second floor bedroom with floor to ceiling windows that made you feel as if you were sleeping in the trees.
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
pollyesther713

what a visionary! I love his style, and am lucky enough to live in an area that has some of his masterpieces.

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Cin Z

@ Nancy Whitehead -- I was at Taliesin West 2 weeks ago and there are 15 students studying in the Master's program right now. We saw them in their environment working. Warmer months they study at Taliesin in WI and cooler months they study at Taliesin West in Scottsdale. Nice snowbird plan they have! They still sleep outdoors and these are not enclosed structures, they are like a concrete gazebo that is nowhere near full circle. Fully exposed to the elements including rattlesnakes, bobcats and coyotes which you would surely see daily here. We happen to have family who lives as the crow flies on the other side of the McDowells but still in Scottsdale and these animals are frequent visitors. It is optional for the students to arrange off campus housing and rent nearby if they so choose but FLW encouraged studying and living in the natural environment.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Rachel Horn Interiors

thanks for sharing, this was done so well!

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Designed With You

Amazing............. quality craftsmanship done with vision and style. Hard to believe anyone would allow it to get into a state of disrepair, so glad to see it's restoration!

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
ratin

thanks for this post

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Elisabeth
So interesting reading all the posts, from ugly, hate it to boring to magnificent, love it. And I wonder if this post attracted the largest number of comments of any Houzz article ever?
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
normpo

Beautiful house. What a shame no one lives in it to enjoy it. I hereby volunteer!

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Curtis mallia

I don't get how people can call this house ugly! the details and design elements are simply beautiful and unique!


Frank is my favourite architect as he had such an amazing taste!

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
PCEI On The Move Inc.

Love the design and space, very unique.

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Birdie Miller Designs

Breathe taking all the way through!

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
teanhny

Jaw dropping is right! It is like a palace. What I love most about Wright is how well thought out the integration between the structure and nature is and the repetition of form which is also a mirror of the two.

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Leah Prischak
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?><md>Beautiful house + beautiful videos= A+ job Houzz

This keeps me inspired! Please make more! ( falling waters
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
mandcsmamadee

Gob-smacked

2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Cheryl DeMarco Architect

Growing up in the Los Angeles area, I became very interested in his style and I found all the Frank Lloyd houses in So Calif. I made it a point to at least drive by all of them. I used to run by the Millard house in Pasadena and look through the gate as it was close to my house growing up. My younger brother even took a girl to the prom who lived in one of them! My favorite house of all the homes he did in South California is the Ennis House. The Ennis House is just a great location with views and the home has some nice interior spaces that lead themselves to the views. The Hollyhock house is a great example of his style. If you ever get a chance, go tour it.

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Jill Morris

Wonderful, just wonderful!

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Elisa Wright Designs

On my list to view! I love Frank Lloyd Wright..

1 Like