Houzz Tour: Going Off the Grid in 140 Square Feet

Houzz Tour: Going Off the Grid in 140 Square Feet

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Houzz Tour: Going Off the Grid in 140 Square Feet

Once you get past the size of Vina Lustado’s $40,000 house, which is 140 square feet, two things may still surprise you. One, she designed and built the house to be her home for life. “It’s not temporary. I’m never leaving,” Lustado says. Two, it’s a great place to throw parties with a lot of people. “I’ve never entertained as much as I have since I built my tiny house,” she says.

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risris
Often the homes inspired by the tiny house movement veer too far into the rustic camp aesthetic for my tastes. This is one of the most livable and chic iterations I've seen yet - so inspiring.
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Bette P
Very nicely finished, some tiny homes are a bit dodgey. Surprising that the county will not allow composting toilets. I thought California was more advanced than that.
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BluePrince Architectural
Neat place! I like the kitchen-washroom layout; it seems more livable than some of the other tiny-house ones. I also really like the leaf-theme throughout; it's quite stylish
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wuff
This tiny house is more like it, a few others as already stated have been a pretty mean way to live. Like the shower, even the toilet down the lane. The skylight above bed would help negate claustrophobia, neat and tidy
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Sasha Endemann
Amazing, what a beautiful and practical way to optimise space.
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Sage Lane Realty
There's a laptop on the desk. Perhaps I don't understand what "Going off the grid" means...
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samanthaja
Lanie--"Going off the grid" just means that you produce all of your own electricity.

What a beautiful home! I can see why she never wants to leave. I love that she has a "guest room" too.
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Mountain ARC
@Lanie Historically "off the grid" refers to the electrical grid or transmission lines supplied by a public utility. The definition has grown to include gas, water, phone, and sewer.
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Shakuff
Really beautiful!
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Mountain ARC
I agree with the previous comments, designing your tiny home to look like a miners cabin from the late 1800's will not transport you back in time. Simplicity is the key as displayed by miss lustado. Her use of readily available materials and products from IKEA and home improvement stores proves how easily and inexpensively this can be done.
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Becky Harris
This is the first tiny house I've seen that I could ever see myself living in — it's very alluring. She did an absolutely brilliant job - her home is cozy, smart and beautiful.
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Jared Lewis Construction Inc.
Unbelievable how beautiful and efficient. With a young family I'm not there yet but someday
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JTBaldwin
Such a lovely and well thought out space. And the skylight/fire escape idea is brilliant!
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Pamela Bateman Garden Design
Really beautiful and functional. I love all the wood details and it is great to see a fireplace and skylights in a tiny home. The most appealing is the cost. For those of you that don't know California prices, Ojai, is a very expensive place to live with small standard homes costing around $500,000 and most of the other homes running in the multi millions. It is a wonderful small town in Southern California and to own a house and to live in that town for $40,000 with the addition of only a little rent is quite an accomplishment. Well done!
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Julie Blesener
Beautiful. When I get home tonight I am starting my material purge. Thank you for sharing.
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lllsmith
It's beautiful, tasteful and peaceful. I love it. I have a 2,000 foot house with too much stuff. I am trying to reduce. I know less is more.
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Rich Higgins
What does "Nothing was bought except the screws on the deck," mean if everything else listed in the article was bought? And I'm glad that "she built it" was clarified in the article since she actually didn't build it.
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Karen
Love this home! Thank you Ms. Lusado for sharing so many details including cost, labor, legal restraints, resources, and for being forthright about your priorities.

I respect your choices and sounds like you went about this project with eyes open and an awareness of your needs and wants. I could definitely live similarly with just a few minor changes.

You've created a beautiful, functional and very personalized space. Congrats and I hope you enjoy your home for the rest of your life!
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Charlene Lynch
This home is very well thought out and ecologically speaking it fairs well for the environment. I also adore the idea of buying most of your items local and re-using materials.

To Rich Higgins: In my little mind, I read the word "build" and took it as - she built her home in her mind, envisioned, an abstract meaning of the word (emotionally speaking) - and when you collaborate on something as grand as this, by all means take credit and say you've built it too.
As for the "Nothing was bought except the screws..." - they were solely on the discussion of the deck, no?
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kdangeli
I sincerely hope she is not using a standard garden hose for potable water. Garden hoses ALMOST universally contain lead and she is poisoning herself and her guests if she is.
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Lindsey Akin
I don't think I could do it full time, but a little vacation getaway like this would be fabulous. Huge respect to her for this amazing little home, so well thought out, so stylish and yet comfortable at the same time. And yes, $40,000 in Ojai is mindblowing!
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frenchdecor
I am looking for a small vacation home and plan to build a separate 500sqf house (not a loft, but high ceiling for air with bank beds) on property for my visiting family or rent for up to 6 people ($10-15k estimated cost, mostly DIY). In my opinion in tiny house things must be very basic and universal, as in old times. I understand it was built for designer herself and her particular wants/needs, granted, but I think this house is not really universally efficient, I mean some details seems are not. For instance, open shelving instead of less quantity closed cabinets, quite big built-in desk instead of table and storage-desk, bathroom sink with no vanity for storage (I hear "openness", then storage need to be somewhere and takes space anyway), sofa cushion can be used in loft for sleeping guest (it's narrow and no ladder to it, why not sleep right where it is?) and remote control fireplace where everything within 2-3 steps (okay, from the loft because it's not very convenient to get down and up). Hot air tend to go up always plus heat from roof, isn't it too much inconvenience sleep up-high? What am I missing? Should I re-think my design?
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Shakeela
I'm a huge fan of tiny homes and this is just perfect.
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Amy Collora Gaitan
While I love living simple in small spaces and the challenge of maximizing them, you lost me at outhouse.
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AliciaTappDesigns Images on Tiles
charming
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Sage Lane Realty
samanthaja and 2BD, thanks.
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comfy by design
What a wonderful forever home! It is obvious that this woman understands that less is more. The freedom she has by living there must bring her a warm and secure feeling. The layout and décor shows her personality throughout. Wonderful lesson for us all.
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risris
The more I look at this house, the more I want to live here. Think of it - you could have the whole place company-ready in ten minutes and deep cleaned in an afternoon!
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rnereid
I would love to see someone do a cost break down on this type of tiny house. I'm always surprised by the cost, some tumbleweed houses are built for 75k! Granted these homes are adorable and the detail always impressive but how precisely are these costs wracked up? The price per square foot is close to 300! Other than that I love your amazing home, kudos to you!
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Hal Braswell Consulting
I understand the Tiny House concept and the desire not to have a big mortgage but...

$40,000 for 140 SF is about $285 per SF, which is astronomical.

At $285 per SF, that would make our 1300 SF house about $370,000. A new brick home that size can be built for about $130-150,000 where I live.

I understand having the house on wheels for mobility and to bypass some codes or tax issues. It is literally a mobile home. And while I am not familiar with the weather where it is located, in many areas prone to tornadoes and hurricanes I would suspect it would be as vulnerable to wind as a traditional mobile home.
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rbrad
Well done and very inspiring!
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Kyle Zagar
It's amazing. I'm jealous.
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LineBox Studio
Great
   
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radiohead280
To each their own, and kudos to her for awareness of environmental impact.
However, it wouldn't work for me, personally, here in New England. In California the great outdoors is your home all year round, so a small house is not a jail sentence. Let's cut to New England in January now. It's dark for most of the day. It's 15 degrees outside. Trust me, a 100 yard walk to an outdoor composting toilet will not be part of a fun lifestyle. In the winter, I appreciate enough indoor room, 2500 square feet, that allows me to take aerobic walks from one end of the house to the other. I personally believe moving into ever more microscopic cocoons as population increases from today's 7 billion worldwide to 9 in 20 years - is a depressing, unhealthy prospect for all. I'm a huge fan of Paul Ehrlich, the ignored "voice in the wilderness", an environmental scientist who claims that a 1.5 billion population would be a far healthier world, for biodiversity, quality of life, cost of living (supply and demand - notice your food and energy costs compared to 1998?).
All adults should read the web page at http://triviumquadrivium.wordpress.com/2009/08/28/what-is-the-ideal-population-of-the-earth/, which discusses how incredibly better our quality of life would be if we raised our expectations and joined in a gradual dial-back, via 1.8 children per adult couple for 200 years.
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C.K. Adams
There's a gigantic number of things I love about this teeny, tiny house.
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Mountain ARC
$/s.f. Is a "lowest common denominator" type of comparison made popular by realtors and appraisers. It's the number one promoter of the latest bigger must be better craze.
If you a have the same number of amenities and storage in a house that is twice the size, the cost will only be marginally greater, not double, because you are only adding concrete, stud lumber, and drywall. The bulk of the cost of a home is in the cabinetry, appliances, fixtures, and custom finishes.
It would almost be like valuing cars based on size. A Ferrari would cost half that of a Chevy astro.
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10elise
I had the opportunity to spend the winter in California, in a Park Model, no less. At 399 square feet, I thought it was just right. It taught me quite a bit about living in smaller spaces, especially when I am rattling around my nearly 2000 square foot home. Truly ridiculous for a single person. I would not want to go below the 399 square feet and having an outdoor space that is the same size as the Park Model seems almost essential, especially when entertaining.
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Mike BROUSE fine art
Whatever happened to 1000 - 1250 sq feet home? The "tiny" home will always be a curious spectacle to most American's. Why not design a 1000 square foot awesome green home on a 30 ft x 60ft lot?
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darbyc
Crawling into bed, literally. Not for me long term or I would have to built a huge verandah!
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grizzly
Expand this little house up to about 800 square feet and it would be perfect for me. The deck is one of the most attractive I have seen.
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Maryl Hershelman
I love the small house idea but the ladder to the sleeping loft that is so common to these designs make me wince. A bad ankle and a bit of arthritis...I'll settle for my little house all on one level. I'd just sleep on the "sofa" and still gaze out the skylight.
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pipeman1
My husband and I have been living in a 400 sq. foot cabin for over a year now...it makes me laugh to hear people say they pull live in a cute little space!

What will you do without closets? Those big bulky coats and dozens of shoes won't fit under the sofa or the rocker. You can't hang them on the fireplace and snow will surely ruin them on the screened porch. Put them in bins? And where do you stack the bins? At the foot of the bed so you can trip over them every night? On the kitchen counter so you can move them 3 times a day in order to cook?

What do you do when company comes? Let them all pile on the bed, sit on the coffee table, stand at the doorway and play games on the floor?

Where do you possibly have room for luxuries like stew pots, griddles, blenders, pressure cookers and food processors? Where do you put spices, utensils, Tupperware and extra plates? How do you even begin to cook a big meal with a four foot counter space and no kitchen table?

Where do you put all your cool stuff? Like the retro bar cart, martini glasses, giant art pieces, photographs, guitars, collections, seasonal decor and keepsakes?

Where do you store your bills and financial papers? Your favorite books? Your dogs toys? Those extra blankets, pillows, comforters and rugs?

Believe me, I know small house living. It gets old really quickly.
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Joanne Maurer
I think it's just adorable. I live in a 280 square foot apartment and I have lots of room. I would love to live in a tiny house. But i am too old now to make it up and down the loft stairs....lol. We don't need as much stuff as we think and I think she did a beautiful well thought out design. Kudos and lots of luck in your new home.
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akarapetsas
I would like to see a geriatric try to climb up to the loft for bedtime. This is not a place where one can grow old in. How about having to go to the bathroom a couple to times during the night as seniors often have to? So in due time, one would have to move to another residence as it is not designed for aging.
If one develops a bladder infection, that could be a problem...

Another solution would be to sleep on the couch...
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bellewest
What does she do with the grey water?
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pdkaltenbach
Wow, my compliments on the fine details in its construction. Looking at the images I see a lot of well thought out tweaks in the design..

As for the loft bed -- here in NYC they are almost a necessity unless you are a member of the wealth class. We have one and I honestly like it a lot, it's like a cozy retreat up away from the world. A bit of diffused lighting, a reading light, and a flat screen TV on the wall and you are livin' large. The one mod I'd like to implement is the fireman's pole. Seriously, getting up into a loft is MUCH easier than getting down.

Again, my compliments on a beautiful execution
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rosebayrenovation
This is an attractive small space situated in an especially spiritual and culturally-minded community. A very peaceful lifestyle.
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Ken Parsons Architect
Awesome!!! And in Ojai none the less! This fun place shows that one need not buy into the myth that one needs hundreds of thousands of dollars (or millions, as is often the case in places like Ojai and nearby Santa Barbara) to live well in a wonderful area. I'm inspired!
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grandmariver
I like the way Tiny Homes combine living, dining, and office rooms in one, in an attractive and intelligent design. That makes more sense than giant, separate rooms that are rarely used.
But, I would need more room, just to have the illusion of "breathing space." How about a "Medium-sized Home?" One where you don't have to pay to store your stuff. And, a wrap-a-around porch as an added bonusl!
One more thing-Where's a garden (veggie, shrubs, or flowers)?
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nhyirahene enterprise
very beautiful will like to have one where i live.
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nhyirahene enterprise
any investor ready to do business in Africa with this type of building can get in touch with me.
   
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Sauve
It is a very nice home. I do like the leaf motif. IKEA makes some great stuff for small and compact installations that can be arranged to meet the needs from small to immense sized houses. In my opinion, it's a boon that IKEA is an environmentally conscience company too. I am writing this post on my new Bekant desk and I am very pleased with it. Actually, more pleased than I thought I would be since I had owned Galant in the past and had planned to build an extensive Galant working station in my studio. What is nice about the Bekant is you can by the standard sit down version or the version that will lift and descend automatically so that the person can have a sitting or standing desk as needed. Anyway, a little off the subject I think it makes sense to use IKEA in a Tiny House if one is concerned about environment also.

What surprised me though is that huge heating stove for such a small area. We have a Godin in our 1600sf house and the thing pumps out so much heat that we were opening windows and changing into summer clothing. This is a blog where another American in France has discovered Godin and she has some photos on her blog you might find interesting. You can find it here:
http://thefranco-americanflophouse.blogspot.fr/2014/01/the-flophouse-godin.html
Our Godin is about 3 times as big as her's but our home is also again as large. My inlaws have a modern Godin smaller than ours, modern in design, that heats up their 2,500 sqf home in the alps without any problem.
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laragazza
The average home price in Ojai CA (which is near Santa Barbara) is $545K (according to city-data.com.) So she has done well with her $40K home. $400/month to rent an acre in an area like that is also a great bargain. No taxes! And how intelligent of her to make it technically a mobile home to avoid red tape. I believe I'd be using that indoor toilet a lot more though, even if I had to turn it into a porta-potty. Love that she hid it in a bench!

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Leslie Benfield
The windows make all the difference. Love the round one over the bed.
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Linda Loftin
It is a lovely home, but more sited to a young person. It won't be practical when she is of social security age and has to think about she and a guest climbing up to that loft. The home is suited to Southern California only. In most of the country, the home would be too hot in the summer or too cold in the winter, and people would not want to venture out to that toilet. But for her current age and her climate, it is delightful.
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patchworksampler
So well thought out. Planning is everything in such a small space.
Light and airy decorating. Good job. Even though i like a lot of space i wouldn't feel claustrophobic in here.
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sheepdogma
From a young senior with bilateral total knee replacements, if she has any kind of mobility problem she will be sleeping on the couch!
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deeners1
I don't understand the appeal of this "tiny home" craze at all. The truth is , she is not just living in 140 square feet. Her possession are stored in other places, so that would be the same as living in a bigger house and having everything all under one roof. Instead she has a toilet in one building, her other things stored in a storage locker and an airstream. So she has four buildings instead of one.
It feels to me like people who live in tiny spaces and are proud of it and act like possessions are a bad thing to have. You can still focus on the important things of life and own "stuff". It doesn't have to be either or.
I wonder if she cooks very much at home, or if she has many hobbies. I sew, paint, draw, garden, ski and that takes up lots of space to store the equipment. I feel these activities enrich my life.
I understand everyone is different and that is a glove that fits her.
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steamboatstyle
This is the best small home I've ever seen on Houzz. It is one of the smallest, but has the best and most practical layout.
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Kathy Dunn
Interesting and attractive take on the Tiny House style but once again I have to mention that this is not something that is going to allow this owner to age in place. “It’s not temporary. I’m never leaving,” she says, but as she ages, the steps to the deck with no hand rail will start to be an issue and a total obstacle if she needs to use a wheelchair. Obviously the loft bed is really only an option for a young and fully able bodied person. She can't even have a visitor to any of her "dinner parties" who is mobility impaired. Not having a legal toilet in the home is also going to get to be a PITA as she ages.
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mdezort
Very nice. I'm inspired to do something similar for a 2nd home in the country (our current home is small and in the city). My only concern is the cost. If my calculations are correct, she paid $285/sq ft to build this. That is incredibly high by any standard. Thoughts?
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mommala
Love that Ms. Lustado splurged on a few non-negotiables like the fireplace. Her thrifty planning & execution of the overall construction apparently enabled inclusion of "luxuries" that increase her satisfaction with the house. Setting priorities of what matters most doesn't have to equal deprivation. She reminds me that I could afford a few extravagant heart's desire items if I don't buy all the doodads that are unnecessary & only briefly enjoyed.
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Marti Meersman
I would love to do this. However, due to the fact that local governments seem to go out of their way to restrict building cottages and tiny homes (whether or not they are on wheels), my options are limited to either living in the middle of nowhere or living in a dangerous neighborhood. Until that changes, I am forced to rent.
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akjones
Hi there, great little place, I hope you enjoy it. I'm looking for a similar ladder and rail, can you tell me where you got yours?
   
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abzoz
Clearly this lady is not a horder :) kudos to her !
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chriszook
Perfect!
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apstrong1
Yes, the aesthetic is lovely but to me this really is more of a "studio" than anything else - no toilet - what DO all those guests do? A house is not a home without a toilet.
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Melanie Dennis
This is a lovely idea, but as someone in my mid - fifties climbing up to bed would not be something I can see my future self doing.
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barnetdracer
Fantastic home. It's surprising what can be done in a smaller space. I'm one of the tiny house movement people and this is a great example of that movement.
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vp82254
That "house" is good for a kid's playhouse and nothing more. What happens when she gets on in years and can't climb up to her loft, or hike out to her toilet? Listen, I'm not in to Mc Mansions, and neither am I into sheds, but this "house " is just an overpriced glorified shed. Sooner or later it's going to get real old climbing up to that loft and hiking outside to the toilet. Get real. Good luck, lady, you're going to need it.
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Sheila Hallmark
Love Joann Maurer's room!!! We need a article on her home! :). And I agree with previous comments, NO way do I want to live one night in a home that doesn't have dependable, spacious (not a bucket thank u very much) bathroom!! I'm not the camper girl, and NO I don't want to climb up to a 'sleeping loft'. I'm not 8 years old. The rest of the home is FAB!
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a1970girl
I love the idea of living in a small place. I was a little taken back when she said the toilet was outdoors, that would be the deal breaker. In planning a house for the future surely one must calculate old age and grandchildren in the mix. A loft sleeping area would not be feasible for an older person in my opinion. I would possibly need a little more knock around room if I ever go this route.
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radianyce
Is this handicap accessible? Can you age in here? May be great Idea for singles but not others.
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imb4ubunny
Personally, I think she designed, built & lived in a house we all have dreamed about-whether or not it would fit our lifestyle...remember, they all laughed at Christopher Columbus when he said the world was round! Kudos for your good work, planning-i admit i am a bit envious!!
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ranchera
Brilliant way to have a guest house simply added to your property.
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Johnson & Johnson Architecture
Love the skylight! What a treat to watch the stars from bed. What a comfortable, cozy home - well done!
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carlritchie
Very nice, love the recycled materials that were used in this build. It would made a great get-a-way studio for a little solitude from all the chaos in the world today. I would have added a solar energy collector package for power and some sort of rain collector system for a small flower/vegetable garden along with washing dishes and the restoom functions.
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Dee
With my bad back and useless knees, climbing up and down a ladder EVERY day and trekking out to the outhouse would surely be torture. I'm guessing she's not intending to have children either, that would be a nightmare when they grow bigger and needing 'space' of their own. Yeah. I don't really mean to be a buzz killer, it's just that I think this is a home meant for a small section of people, those who intend to stay childless and those who don't plan on growing older and less able to use the space as intended. It's a lovely place and well designed for a specific type of person. If circumstances don't change, a very nice and cozy space.
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Jason Parker
It's amazing to look at my 2000 sq ft house in comparison and think, "that's really all you need, why do we feel the need for such larger and larger houses." I love the idea of minimizing and using our space and resources more wisely.
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srgerova
I love this little home! I really do not understand all the negative comments. Please don't ruin this wonderful site like others are being ruined. Coming to Houzz always was a warm accepting place to get ideas and see how others live. There is too much negativity in the world today. Please don't bring it here too.

If I was single and by myself I would love to live off the grid and have my own little home like this. I admire her and think she has a great life just the way she built it!
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brouije
Well at least if she has a falling out with her boyfriend she can take her house and leave.
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releve3830
This home is beautiful. I like the quality and that she has a fireplace. The spaces look roomy. I'm with Joanne Maurer re: sleeping on the sofa as I've always been afraid of heights. I live in a 278 square foot apartment and can't imagine ever living in a larger space again!
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asheesh09
Amazing!
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ifitistobe
The cost is a lot for the square footage, but she's happy with it, and when she gets tired of climbing into the loft I'm sure she will have devised some other layout or design for sleeping. I'm happy for her.
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christina_
Great job! Very thoughtful design and execution.
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Amy Caudill
I have noticed that this trend seems to follow people who are single or a couple with no children. I could live in a smaller space as long as I had running water, sewer and enough solar panels to supply my electricity demands.
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Norma Sassone
Love this - beautiful and serene. As someone in the Medicare and Social Security, less is more, part of my life, it is very tempting. However, a forever home with a ladder to climb down in the middle of the night 2 or three times to go to the bathroom would not be workable for me.
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carolincarolina
This tiny house is delightful. I would argue that a house without a functioning legal toilet is actually not a permanent dwelling. For all practical purposes she has a lovely cabin with an outhouse. I will be stealing her ideas for the kitchen window, embossed glass bathroom door, built-in closet and the entire front deck for the guest cabin we hope to build on our farm.
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Randall Lichner
I'm often amazed what people spend on these tiny houses. Back about 10 years ago, before the movement, I built a grid-connected 512 sqft cottage (16' x 32') on post and pier with a full bath, full kitchen and air conditioning on the Big Island in Hawaii for only $20,000 including the land. I bought everything at Lowes and paid roughly three times the cost for building materials here on the mainland and scrimped on nothing. So, to me spending $40,000 on a trailer is getting hosed. You might as well head down to the RV superstore, spend less and buy a trailer there and get all the amenities (like a bathroom).
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Sabine Vante
The designer did such a wonderful job; her space is so cozy, rustic; I love the look and convenience of everything!

I've never heard of the small home movement before; and with two little ones, it wouldn't work for me, but I'd love to leave the kiddies with dad and spend a week or two up there to relax !
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maba2
It's even bigger than some New York apartments
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mbda007
too good
   
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Bob
I applaud anyone with passion. Especially those who's passion is kinder to the environment, and we can learn from when building a structure that suits our personal lifestyle. A lot of the "not for me" and "good luck" posts are obvious, some not even nice. Try focusing on what you can learn from Vina and dropping the negativity. You'll live a longer, happier life.
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peachknob
Your home is so lovely and so perfect for a single person. It is inspiring. Can I get an invite to one of your parties? Just kidding:)
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Randall Lichner
Sabine - I have three kids and the five of us spend a good amount of time in our small cottage. You'd be surprised at the amount of stuff you have that you can live without.
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Ted Foureagles
Ms. Lusado, what you have created is just drop-dead gorgeous! Of the "tiny house" genre, this is perhaps my favorite so far. There's not a surface, a material, a layout, an ethic here that's not beautiful. I could live in this house exactly as it is and still consider it entirely mine. That's almost spooky!

I've had a few small homes (and some much larger ones), ranging from a VW van to a 450 sq. ft. 1879 log cabin. I currently live in a palatial 27' Airstream trailer. Oh, I design 4-8,000 sq. ft. second mansions for a living, and they generally cost $3-400 / sq. ft. It's inspiring to see such a wonderful, livable space that cost about 2% of that. Trade-offs, well sure, but I like seeing someone embracing the concept of not necessarily having every single thing that they may want.

One of my favorite little houses was actually a backyard getaway. Dear Wife & I owned a 3,000 sq. ft. 19th century Victorian house (we ran a hospice in it) way up in the Rockies (the Yellow House in Maysville, Colorad for those interested). A small river split our property, with an old log bridge to the other side. Over there I built a timber framed 12'x16' workshop, complete with a 100 year old 2-hole outhouse.

I decided that I wanted a getaway office/living space, and so I added a 12/12 four dormer roof on 18" knee walls to create a loft with working & sleeping space. The desk for my CAD workstation was an old 3'x8' solid mahogany door, and the bed was a folding cot, which was luxurious for this old guy who has spent half of his life sleeping on the ground. I could pick apples from the "bedroom" window. I like to have some tall spaces in tight quarters, and so I left a 5'x7' opening in the loft floor, for an 18' high ceiling there, with large windows overlooking the river. I re-purposed some of the original windows & doors taken out of the old big house -- wavy glass and all that. On the other side was a door to a 3'x4' upper level deck with a stair to the ground that was private enough that I could negotiate it naked for a run to the outhouse.

The downstairs (downladder?) space was still largely a workshop holding my carpenter's toys, but was uncluttered enough to be easily transformed into social space in short order as long as guests didn't mind décor by Porter Cable and Dewalt A 12" planer with a slab of plywood on top makes a passable card table. Outdoor landings & decks were wood pallets propped on rocks. There was a small woodstove that, if I could get some good hardwood (not easy or cheap in Colorado where pine, cottonwood & aspen are the staples), could heat the whole place over a Rocky Mountain winter night. There was no other heat source, and so my 40-below down sleeping bag was the main piece of bedding. There was no plumbing, but the old outhouse and older river were right there. Granted, sometimes snow shoveling & ice breaking were factors, but I kept a bedpan under the cot and a kettle of water on the woodstove for those times when nature resisted going outside. And there was always the big house across the river that I visited often because, well, my wife lived there and I sort of nominally did too.

I loved that little house, and greatly miss it. I hope that someone still enjoys it.

}}}}
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Joanne Maurer
Thank you everyone for all your like's this is actually a picture of my 280 square foot apartment and I don't have an extra storage unit.
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nitpicker
Water through a garden hose? Perhaps one of the worst decisions ever. An earlier comment mentioned lead, I cannot find that data, but even without that important bit of information, where is the source of the water? How long is the run? Water pressure? I must say, I think that she is living dangerously. Compound that with renting the land? You don't go off the grid to be subject to the whims of a boyfriend and landlord. I applaud the effort. I think she is working things out. But I also think that this is one giant error in the essentials of self sufficiency of ownership, water, sewage, and power. By the way, where is her transportation stored? Is this yet another small place with a giant truck out front, or is it parked 100 yards away too?
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Joanne Maurer
I have downsized 3x...the children are in their 30's and live in other states. I hung up my apron and passed the spoon to my children and now it's just me and the tiny dog. I live in a building with an elevator and all the stores are literally around the corner, I gave up the car and the tv, I live in the city where everything is walking distance. I am happier than ever. When i visit my children, I cook for them and then leave all the pots and pans there along with the food processor etc. Small spaces are not for everyone...it is a choice...their choice...my choice...all spaces are fabulous as long as your home is happy and welcoming. So enjoy all your spaces and keep an open mind about things.
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judymchartrand
Not all tiny houses are rustic, Blue Homes, offer very contemporary style homes. And by far my favorite. But most definitely more expensive.
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judymchartrand
Sorry, that is Blu-Homes
   
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familialevy
I love this efficient place and I admire her cool grit to live so simply! I know she wants to live there forever but I cannot imagine negotiating that ladder up to the loft when she ages.
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Randall Lichner
Mike BROUSE - someone has come up with a design. Try www.Greenmodernkits.com? The Casa Ti by architect David Day is a nice eco 1000 soft.
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grobby
This is a well designed small house. Sounds like she got everything that was necessary. Love the kitchen window and skylight. Imagine the time and money she saves, no big utility bills -smart !
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lindapugh
I'm thrilled that the 'small home movement' is growing and gaining recognition. It's time has come. People must be more aware of that fine distinction between their needs & wants.
I appreciate what Lustado has designed for herself. However, let's be very clear: this is far more easily accomplished in parts of the world where climate is warmer. Not so do-able where cold & snow factor in to the equation.
We raised a family of 4 in an 1100 square-foot house for 12 years before we finished the basement with a tv room, office, bedroom, 2nd full bath, laundry rm, & furnace room/storage. It would've been impossible otherwise. Smart choices of furnishings & editing of possessions is critical.
We've seen others enjoy the luxury of living in larger houses with unused square footage. But location is everything & we have stayed in our small house in our great neighborhood for over 28 years.
And have no plans to go elsewhere.
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craiginpa
Love the concept as it seems to fit your needs extremely well. One question though: I don't see exhaust venting for the cooking, and after decades (or less) inhaling cooking fumes & exhaust can be hazardous (e.g., one of many suspected causes of cancer). Is there an exhaust vent there above the window and shelf?
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Patricia Earehart
It is "freeing" to simplify, due clutter and downsize your life. This is brilliant! Not for everyone but definitely for me! I live in an 800 sq FT condo and I feel like I have more space then necessary. Love her home on wheels.
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dreamdoctor
In general kudos. If energy is as big an issue as you say the wood stove is quite over sized - many very small, efficient stoves available (that bring in outside combustion air). If the shell is even marginally well insulated and sealed you should be able to heat this with a candle and the heat off the laptop ( a little exaggeration but not much). Inspiring - wish more people would get it and that there would be whole neighborhoods of these on small, micro farm-able lots in the city.
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dumbmother
Love it! But, I couldn't commit to anything this small.
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Carole M.
I love this wee home. I don't think I could live there personally, but could see it being great for a get away. I think the argument of it cost too much per sq/ft doesn't really matter because at the end of the day a. she loves it so what does it matter? and b. her ongoing costs must be minuscule. I think there is something to be said for that.
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moongypsy
I'm with the aging set about no lofts. I have also had bi-lateral total knee replacement, and back surgery in the last 18 months. My knees are great, but crawling on them is not going to happen. Oh the fun of aging.

I don't have any issues with small space living. Actually I have been researching possibilities for retirement. When I met my wife I had lived years in a 240 sf trailer. I think she is amenable to less of keeping up with the Jones, and more living within our means as long as it's not a dump.
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trail6
I love this home. Great job on the design. It gives me some more ideas for making my deck one day. I've been living in a 360 sq/ft house for 3 years now. I've always loved and supported the Tiny House Movement and the Leave A Small Footprint philosophy. I feel so happy, every morning, when I wake up. Less Space = Less To Do.
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releve3830
She has those fabulous French doors to open when cooking.
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Tavia
This small space is amazing!
   
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stevedenver
I am zeroing in on Small House (200-400sf) features and am glad to see some in her place:
• The biggest kitchen sink possible -- I like her large sink! It can always be covered for extra counter space, but it's there when you need it, to wash large batches of vegetables, do hand laundry.
• Pocket doors! Make walls function as much as possible.
• Sky-light: Brings breathing room to tight spaces. I'm also a big fan of shed dormers.
• Stairs! I do not want to climb up and down a ladder. How about attic stairs that pull down for use, or stairs that pull out from the wall similar to bleachers in a school gymnasium, or permanent stairs that are drawers and storage?
• I really like her work space: it's where she spends a lot of time, give it the space she needs to function easily.

I like the idea of living mortgage free, not subject to the whim of landlords, and a "pared down life."
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punkylemons
This is great but, I hope wildlife was taken into consideration for her safety. I've seen bears smash places much bigger than this to bits trying to get to food.
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patsy35
Amazing how everything does double duty and slides into somewhere. I think its absolutely delightful and very workable space even for a claustophobic like me.
   
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radele
So while I admire the small house movement, my hobbies would quickly overwhelm such a small space. And what does she do for laundry? Hand wash, dry clean? I eagerly gave up carting laundry to a laundromat years ago. I would need at least 800sqft to fit a washer/dryer combo.
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modestgoddess z7 MD
I'd love to see the inside of the pantry and wardrobe. I'm always curious about how much stuff you can store in these tiny homes.
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Shannon Holman
I really like the use of plywood for the walls here. Do you suppose it's birch ply with a white wash?
The built-ins are also so thoughtful.
Sweet sweet home!
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lizzy33
I think this is a fun trend and it will be very interesting to see how it plays out over time. There are a lot of people, like myself, who admire the philosophy behind this movement, but can't see themselves making this big of a leap! I like the idea of "enough". Too many Americans have allowed themselves to be sucked into the consumer or even acquirer mindset, where we never seem to have enough. We need to learn that we can not only get by, but actually thrive on less! Life needs to be about "being" not "having"!
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davesmac
“It’s not temporary. I’m never leaving,” I think then that the loft as a bedroom will have to change. 60, 70+ in age can't be going up to the loft. As others have commented, I would be sleeping on the couch. Have a custom built in folding bed/couch. How do you get up onto the loft above the desk? Lug the loft ladder over? There is no safety rail for the guest sleeping on the loft above the desk. Major safety concern. Just turning 59, I think of things like this! It is adorable and livable. We don't need huge homes to live in and be happy. My house is 1501 sq foot. Neighborhood requirement was 1500 sq ft. Otherwise we would have opted for smaller.
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lindapugh
People interested in building & living this way should really tour a few RV's, houseboats, or sailboats to discover the best ways to maximize usable space & living with less. Those designers are really the best experts in the world of small space living.
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groovy56
That's a beautiful house - I especially like the skylight in the loft area!
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dreamdoctor
Pipeman1 - OK, we get it - that you don't. It would be like saying to a vegan you could never give up meat, cheese and eggs (or TV to a health advocate). I didn't give it up so much as I decided I didn't need it and it was making me fat, lazy and unhealthy (and it is expensive and contaminates my counter tops and such). She made a similar decision about her choice of housing. She is not tied to a boat anchor of stuff as most of us are and has figured out that " If you don't wear shoes you'll have no shoes to lose." She has figured out what is truly important. So you bemoan a lack of places to put stuff and it sounds like someone whining about the cost of bacon to a vegan. We all pay for everyone's life style. The bacon muncher puts an undue load on healthcare and the stuff collector puts a load on the infrastructure and the environment - not theory - every increasing reality. And of course given the choice of spending the money on insulation or efficient appliances they will go for more SF and high-end finishes/fixtures. It is the default mode - the world or ME! I wish you the best in figuring out what life is about. Happiness is an attitude but not the kind you have - because you don't sound happy. True? If I only had a bigger house and more stuff right?
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Dawn Owens
Dear Code Enforcers: I really want to know how come my dog (and all the wild animals around here) can safely pee and poop outdoors, but I can't. How come I can't vent my gray water to a garden after using biodegradable detergents and soaps, and how come given enough land between houses, I can't safely take care of humanure, either? How dare you tell me I can't live in less than 200 SF safely? Seems like in flag-waving land, where we keep being told we're 'free', we really are not. Pay for a permit, get permission, pay a fine if you ignore the permitting process, etc and so forth. Code Nazis. A friend wanted to put a house in a remote location. He could afford the land and the house, but not the long driveway able to take a heavyweight firetruck...' that would have cost as much as the land did! By the time a firetruck arrived to such a remote location, any fire would have been out by itself. That's what insurance is for, you take your chances. Time to stop trying to protect people from either their bad, or their good, ideas.
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Dawn Owens
Love your commentary - people don't seem to realize all that 'stuff' they are told to want by the teevee is made by children and wage slaves in poor countries. We all are worth more than spending our days in factories or cubicle farms.
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Candace Ravelle
Beautifully done , I could totally live like that my self , I give
Her big kudos for conserving .not sure if she has a organic green house or not ? I totally would have that on that land it's easy to grow stuff there, speaking of long hot showers ,A lot of California's water comes From Lake Mead , which is very low right now .. I think some how adding a shower that saves the water that then she can use for laundry would be cool . We really need systems like that in all our homes ,that would really top off this home .
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Cheryl @ Artzzle.com
Mitchell, I've cut way down on my clutter and "keeps" . . . but would not survive very long here. Can appreciate the great design, work and ideas that went into it's making though. Shared it with my blog readers. Thanks for the great article.
   
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gozvrrm
I don't understand the criticism of Pipeman1. She ACTUALLY LIVES in a 400 sq ft cabin and is pointing out some of the hardships that are often glossed over in discussions of "tiny houses." It is nice to look at beautiful photos and say how wonderful it would be to get rid of the burden of your "stuff," but it is not all rainbows and unicorns.
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dscheffelman
I think that the entire concept of down-sizing stuff is more important than the idea of living in a tiny space. Although there is certainly nothing wrong with living like that when you have the great out of doors in S. Cal. almost all the time. Here in beautiful Wisconsin, you would be stuck in the tiny space a lot of the time. That would drive me completely insane. But living with fewer possessions ----would be freedom.
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trail6
Dawn Owens...To give you a stark reality fact. One of my finishing contractor friends who worked on the Orange County-Newport Coast, CA homes for over 20 years, pointed out to me some vent stacks coming out of the ground and asked me what I thought they meant…He said that for years, all of the builders had all been dumping their trash for years and years there and now because of having no areas left to build on, they covered over it, vented the ground and continued building. We're talking about homes in the millions, being built over a dump. Where are the regulations for that?
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trail6
Well gozvrrm, it's because she is sounding like it's coming from a place of the homeowner being attacked by her and being scolded like a child being put in a corner and not allowed any supper because she is a minimalist and "pipeman1" having an ego of "look what "I" have". Sounding like "She" is resentful and doesn't like where she's living. As for me…it actually is "all rainbows and unicorns" for me, just so you know. People who sound nasty are really unhappy with themselves and don't take into account of each persons distinct situations. I live in a 360 sq/ft house and have been for over 3 years now. I'm, all the time, still looking for ways to still pare down what I have.
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dreamdoctor
Dawn Owens - check out dreamgreenhomes.com; mine are under Mark Clipsham or "manufactured". On top of no framing in the exterior walls/roof add high strength, lightweight, minimal labor, super high-performance, easily decommissioned/recyclable, low cost, no maintenance, great IAQ to start.
   
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A Lean
Lovely get away for a warm climate where the outside can serve as an entertainment area. Not feasible in Canada, where it can be winter from early November until late April. Cabin fever would set in by December 1st.
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Dawn Owens
trail6 - While million dollar homes built over vented dumps would seem to come under the heading of 'buyer beware', (and obvious overpopulation issues) reality is that we all are building on the refuse and waste products of the animals and humans that came before us down through the ages. One is biodegradable, but recent human activity and products like plastic, not so much. Proper disposal and recycling of human waste is a matter of knowledge and a bit of land, not often overblown and ridiculously expensive code requirements. Too many code requirements look to me like the badged equivalent of the Mafia with their hand in your pockets, or else. We've ended up with empty houses and homeless people all over the place, a form of insanity for sure. That's what capitalism produces in the end; a few winners, many losers, and many job slaves.
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Ei Chey
It must take a lot of discipline to live like this but I imagine those small dinner parties on the deck are full of priceless memories. Must be nice to be hosted by a hostess who isn't exhausted from maintaining a larger home. There's a trade off for every living situation.
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gozvrrm
trail6: "the homeowner being attacked by her and being scolded like a child being put in a corner and not allowed any supper because she is a minimalist and "pipeman1" having an ego of "look what "I" have"

Gosh, I guess I did not take it that way at all. Maybe she will come back and explain further.

As I read Pipeman1's comment, I was thinking about when I was living in a tiny place in the woods and the many times/ways I grew weary or frustrated with having to cook dinner with so little counter space, or not having enough space in the refrigerator, or having no space to iron, or no way to have visitors if the weather was bad, or having to disconnect the hose and drain it downhill (in the rain or snow!) when the overnight forecast was for below freezing, or not having a dryer (fun in the winter!), or having a washing machine outside that I filled with a hose (fun in all seasons, especially the winter), or having no space for more than a few clothes, etc, etc.

That said, I enjoyed it overall and would not trade that 5 years for anything, but it is not without its difficulties. People should realize that.
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Pat
While I like the general concept, and what's not to like about the style, I doubt this is a structure for life, as I can't see an 80 year old climbing the ladder to the bed loft.
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Susie Eaton
Really lovely little home! Wondering a couple of things:
1. Are there no insects in Southern California? I don't see any screens on the windows. 2. No need for airconditioning? 3. It looks like there could be storage on both sides of the desktop to the bed deck above as well as to the left below? However,I don't see any hinges for doors. Curious as to what those spaces are used for.

There is room for a great deal of storage under the sofa, also wondering what she stores under there? Am I being too nosy? I like to call it "interested."
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Studio NOO Design
Love it, tiny, smart and cozy ! Well done !
   
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imissliberty
Most garden hoses have warning labels telling people not to drink from them. I certainly would not use a garden hose to supply drinking water, especially if the sun shone on it and could leach plastics into the water. I hope she's using a special RV hose for potable water.
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dreamdoctor
Dawn O - I avoid doing projects in the city as much as I can - they seem to take glee in justifying their jobs and "by the booking it" even when it doesn't make sense. The wilds are vanishing though so it must be time for a revolution. The city said they would love for someone to propose installing a grey water system and then pretty much promised to make it a living hell to get it approved - and this is in an "open minded" city. Taking the bike paths they put in will get you killed - lip service to meaningful change. They have "compatibility" statutes in place - yes, anyone can live here - as long as you're just like us. Boring and unhealthy.
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trail6
Dawn Owens- I hear you. I totally get what you are saying, but I guess you are of aware of the carcinogenic and off gassing that these products cause. I also know what you mean about all of us building over a previous societies "garbage".
   
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Candace Ravelle
You can always build it for 80 year olds needs . No one says you have to have a bed upstairs
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rezchick1
I love small houses and plan to greatly downsize w/in a year. But poor people have been doing this for eons and with lots of kids, lol.
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Preferred Design
All the comments this post inspired shows how many of us are intrigued by the idea of living get simply.. I would venture that 90% of us that posted aren't ready to part with our washers and dryers but I could do this in a tree house format for a weekend lake residence. Realistically.
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CH Design
What is the building codes defining as a temporary? You said that you used a trailer. How do you support the tailer in location? Is it just the wheels and a jack stand at one end? Did you take the wheels off?
   
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Sheila Schmitz
Good point, Candace Ravelle. In fact, no one says you have to build this at all! Up to everyone to choose the house that suits him or her best. :)

For those interested in lead-free, bpa-free garden hoses: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003P9XAAA/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=B003P9XAAA&linkCode=as2&tag=oudape-20
   
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inex
beautiful, functional and lovely i like it so much.
   
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aleanor
I agree with dscheffelman.

I have just settled in a new city, having had to buy the necessities since my own things are in storage waiting for a permanent home to be ready, on the other side of the country. It got exhausting buying new things - not fun and very expensive. The is very little plastic, nothing that I would not expect to live with for the life of the product and with few exceptions nothing I already had...only the washing machine has moving parts. Still, crazy to think how much we need even when we are used to living simply. Bed and heavy winter clothes aside, I don't think there would be much difficulty fitting into the space here, which makes my much larger space feel light.

The thing is, I rented a tiny apartment when I first arrived. It was enough space, with some juggling, and in summer was fine since I could get out. In winter, though, I got properly depressed. Not enough light and the feeling of oppression when I woke or walked in. Now I share a much larger space with a friend and am physically better off. We have a little view and lots of light, but also the space needed to do some yoga or dance. And the walls to hang some momentos of other lives and places.

Both this rented flat and the house I am rebuilding are over 150 years old. The materials used to refinish them both are natural and local to their regions and were they to fall to the ground they would dissolve without any distress to the environment or later people.

Both places are designed for people to come together. They have outdoor space, yes, but given that they are in cold places, there is room also for indoor space to welcome friends for short and long visits. Both are very well insulated and the house (although much bigger) could be heated with the stove seen here for most of the winter. The apartment is heated through city heating systems.

If we avoid too many purchases that cause plastic and other off gassing, if we avoid waste and products so cheap that slave labour is the only option for their production, if we buy what we need and replace only when things are really worn out and if we build responsibly then I don't see the problem with more space to house more people and few things.

Everything in moderation of course but I am a much nicer person now that I have the space to have people around me year-round...
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FatCat
I love small but this is a bit too small for my liking. The atmosphere could be just as cozy in a 9m x 6m building but no smaller. People need to be able to get passed each other with ease and making that bed? Great for a holiday but not to live.
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sheilatemp
I just get butterflies in my stomach looking at tiny homes. This one is so very well designed... Every inch seems accounted for. I am crazy about dollhouses, and for me it would be like living right inside a human sized dollhouse... The ultimate fantasy. Bravo.. Fantastic work and design!
   
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Lea George
Saw this thought of you Dee Dee
   
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twinks76
Really fantastic way of living Eco conscious and chicly done!
   
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Holly Volpe Interior Design
Clever! Absolutely Clever! It's about the "design" not about whether or not it's for us. Taking a space and in this case a "Small" space and making it your own. She's sharing a piece or herself and a piece of Art that she has designed & created herself. Let's not critique the "words" she uses and focus on this Adorable little house. I love it and if it works for "You", you as a designer have satisfied the customer.
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Jeff ginsburg
Wow a realtor that doesn't understand what 'off the grid' means. Even I am shocked by that one. Someone else picking because there were thing purchased, not getting that CL, thrift stores and salvage are different than going to a big box store? I don't feel I am being dishonest when I say we built our house when we paid someone to build it? Yes this is easier in California than Maine....so what? It also appears she has birthed less than the advised 1.8 children. This is simply one of the nicer small homes I have seen. It is her home and not a vacation or guest home. She walks a shorter distance to the bathroom than many do in their McMansions. I wonder what she does with that mortgage payment she probably does NOT make?
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releve3830
Well said tri space interiors!
   
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madesignai
Well done! I can also see this bolted down to a pontoon boat deck...or hoisted up into the trees! The loft floor /ceiling joist cavities are potential spaces for kitchen and loft storage. (hinged access panels).
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Sue Armstrong
Awesome house. Thank you for sharing it. Even though living in a space this small is not for the vast majority of us, knowing that others are doing it keeps the benefits of downsizing, getting rid of stuff, using little energy, impacting the land minimally, in the wonderful mix of living ideas.
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ianvange
What a perfect mobile, compact home, so well thought out and designed.
   
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gozvrrm
All the comments inspired me to read the article and look at the photos again and it brought some questions to mind in case Ms. Lustado is checking in here:

1) I noticed that there is no rain gutter over the door. How does she open the door (especially with it opening outward) if rain is pouring off the edge of the roof. I realize that there is a drought going on right now... maybe that has not been an issue yet.

2) What is her hose connected to? Public water or a well? Or is there a house on the property that she taps into?

3) Does she have any back-up for electricity (for lights/refrigerator, at least) if there is not enough solar?

4) Is she concerned about not having insurance? (This was a big concern for me...)

5) Does her boyfriend's cabin have plumbing and electricity or does he live in the same type of situation?
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altairj
There are some comments that the house might be too small and claustrophobic…but I don't think people realize that while the house is small, the homeowner has a full acre to indulge in space. For those who may not know, Ojai is an adorable Southern California town filled with citrus groves, so think a place where the temperature rarely drops below 40 degrees F. Basically, she may not have much in indoor space, but she has more in outdoor space than most of us will ever have the pleasure of enjoying, outdoor space to paint, read, nap, even probably work on a laptop under a tree.

Most of the tiny houses I see are in beautiful wide open spaces. Tiny apartments where you feel like an ant do suck…unless you're in some glorious city like Manhattan or Paris.
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pipeman1
I appreciate all the comments, and I agree " to each his own". I was just pointing out that the small house lifestyle is not for everyone. It seems romantic, ecological, simplified and less stressful, but a lot goes into preparing for a major downsizing. Luckily, we are building an addition now and we will have more elbow room, storage, and space for entertaining family and friends.
I don't think I'm hurting the environment by wanting to keep special finds I have saved during my 39 years of marriage. I love art, music, flea market finds and industrial salvage. I love having a king size bed, three guitars, a big drafting table for my art work and .....maybe I'm all me, me, me! But I miss having a bath tub! ( we do have a shower!)
We grow and can our own food, have a well for water and burn firewood from dead timber.
But, like someone said, I have had my frustrations with small house living, especially in the winter. And, call me materialistic, but I miss " my stuff".
Yet, I treasure this year of lessons. It has taught me tons about what to keep and what to give away, how to be humble and proud at the same time...I love living on 40 acres in the woods, the birds, and trees, and scents of nature...
But I need to stretch out...just a bit. I don't want a giant house - just a place where our 4 children and 9 grandchildren can gather round the dining room table at Christmas and enjoy wonderful memories.
Again, " to each his own"...
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pipeman1
And PS: I am VERY happy. My living arrangements to not determine that. I stay positive despite having to make adjustments that are uncomfortable for me. Just wanted to set that straight.
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sailnmuffin
I'll take a stab at answering Dawn O's questions to those she called "Code Enforcers" in this thread.

1. "I really want to know how come my dog (and all the wild animals...) can safely pee and poop outdoors, but I can't....how come given enough land between houses, I can't safely take care of humanure, either?" Answer: because very, very few people know how to "safely take care" of human waste, especially in a populated area. Fecal coliform, present in human waste and hazardous to human health, is concentrated in areas where humans congregate, and tends to run off into groundwater, thereby contaminating the water supply for everyone downstream of your DIY "humanure" project.
2. "How come I can't vent my gray water to a garden after using biodegradable detergents and soaps?" Answer: see above: when done incorrectly by people who have no knowledge of waste management systems & are just going by what they read in some magazine article, your gray-water project runs off onto your downhill neighbors' property and pollutes all your downstream neighbors' water supply. Your rights to do what you want on your own land, stop where their rights begin.
3. "How dare you tell me I can't live in less than 200 SF safely?" YMMV in your particular city/county/state, but generally, square-footage restrictions relate to developments governed by homeowners' associations. In urban areas, square footage restrictions typically relate to health & safety issues, in that small structures are either antiquated, and/or often built by non-professional individuals who have little to no experience with how to safely build a foundation and competently wire and plumb a dwelling.
4. "Seems like in flag-waving land, where we keep being told we're 'free', we really are not. Pay for a permit, get permission, pay a fine if you ignore the permitting process, etc and so forth. Code Nazis." Answer: With freedom comes a citizen's responsibility to the society in which she chooses to live.
5. "A friend wanted to put a house in a remote location. He could afford the land and the house, but not the long driveway able to take a heavyweight firetruck...By the time a firetruck arrived to such a remote location, any fire would have been out by itself. That's what insurance is for, you take your chances." Answer: your friend would not BE insurable, because without an appropriate driveway for fire truck access, the risk of a total loss by fire would be too great for the underwriters to justify. It's less about protecting your friend's house from a fire; it's about protecting your friend's fire from spreading to other houses & property. West of the Rockies, about 90% of all the land is in a several-year-long exceptional drought. Fires do NOT "go out by themselves." One house catches fire from a homeowner's lousy DIY wiring job, and hundreds of thousands of acres can burn before the fire can be put out. If your friend can't pay for a decent driveway, he sure won't be able to pay for the damages a fire on his property will cause to everyone around him.
6. "Time to stop trying to protect people from either their bad, or their good, ideas." Answer: it's not about YOU, Dawn O. If it were only you who were impacted by your bad house-construction and waste-management ideas, we'd all be happy to let you sit in your own excrement. It's that your bad ideas affect everyone else's rights and their enjoyment of their own living spaces. There are people who, from either incompetence or irresponsibility, endanger the health and property of those around them. That is why there are building codes, electrical codes, plumbing codes, etc.: to protect the rest of us from OTHER people's bad ideas.
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Peter McDonough
Nice design and well thought out. Life is an adventure, enjoy.
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A Lean
Excellent and thoughtful response, Sailnmuffin. Land of the Free does not mean Land to be Free to do whatever the Heck you Want, regardless of the consequences to others. Of course, I am Canadian and we tend to be less disturbed by the existence of regulations.
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goodewyfe
It's lovely, but too small for me. I want an actual kitchen, even though I don't cook much. It can be small, but big enough to include a refrigerator/freezer. I also want indoor bathrooms. And I do not want to have to worry about blowing fuses if I use a hair dryer. I think a 2 bedroom/1.75 bathroom home at around 750 square feet would be just right. I imagine it would not be a problem to put solar panels on the roof of a home of that size and not have to worry about electricity or mess around with fuses or propane.
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lilygilder
srgerova - Thank you for urging people to keep their comments on the positive side. As I understand it, Houzz is a home design site that offers information, gives readers a view into other types of living, and generously allows commentary.
This article is about Ms. Lovato's (beautifully designed) tiny home, in her particular location, suited to her wishes and needs. We can extrapolate that a home built in Southern California will not be as useful in Wisconsin, that those of us with knee maladies would find a ladder to the bedroom more than a challenge, and that anyone wise enough to plan this home would research the proper water hose.
Maybe we could read prior comments and Like them rather than leaping to the keyboard to pile on multiple rants. The tiny house concept is not for you? Don't build one!
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Patricia McCausland
I absolutely love the tiny house. I am thinking about doing something like this for my children´s families at the Island where we have a bungalow. In that space, what I would do is use the kitchen space for bunk beds and just leave a mini fridge for them.
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goodewyfe
While I was writing my comment, sailnmuffin was posting theirs. I heartily second what sailnmuffin said. "Your freedom ends at the tip of my nose." - John Locke. It's no different when it's your property versus my property - your runoff, your fire, etc. will have an impact on my property and, by extension, my well-being. It is no different from the Department of Health being lawfully empowered to impose a quarantine on you and the other residents of you household if you test positive for certain contagious and deadly diseases.
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Patricia McCausland
I agree, how about 2 feet away from the tip of my nose....
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CAROLE MEYER
Not for me but very cute!
   
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imb4ubunny
I am wondering if other articles on Houzz become such a contentious debate! Honestly? Here is an article about a person who chose to live "off the grid" but now it has morphed into a story that is worthy of "Housewives". Damn!
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koahsgirl
Love the skylight! The whole space is wonderful! I hope she is able to enjoy her home for many years to come! :)
   
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Norma Sassone
Hey, guys! Just because folks might post some legitimate questions about how to live this way, does not mean they are criticizing her choices. Perhaps they are simply wondering how they might or might not be able to live this way them selves and what obstacles might get n the way of an otherwise very appealing life-style. This IS a forum and one can politely question the posting in order to find out more, perhaps for your own use or edification. Who said Houzz was supposed to only be a place where folks simply respond with a "Well done!" or "Perfect!" ??
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RegularClouds
Does she take laundry out, I see no washer/dryer. I wonder how far of a journey she makes for this, and how often? And, dirty clothes are stored where until then? What about clean clothes? Where is her closet?
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dreamdoctor
imb4ubunny - Gets a bit catty at times - better than having a Houzz "code enforcer". Nothing but education to be gained from introducing a topic which inflames such passion. Architecture and design is about people first - what better way to learn about them than in a forum such as this. Wonderful social dynamic - self monitored for the most part and it works - which is kind of the point Dawn O is making, but yes, that does need to be tempered with some overarching authority when needed. My issue with most (arbitrary/by the book) code enforcement is that people that enforce the code are not trained in design are making inappropriate "design decisions" via code enforcement. Many times they make decisions that kill the project - requiring current air change rates/elevator accessibility for buildings 100 years old that have never had any problems for example - the building remains vacant causing the entire neighborhood to degrade.economically. Who as protected?

My prime directive is to protect the public regarding health, safety and WELFARE. Code officials focus on the health and safety and do not take into account that welfare (a fairly subjective and personal thing - look up definition) greatly affects health and safety in a big picture kind of way. A whole book could be written on this.
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CB8QFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ncbarch.org%2Fhswdef.pdf&ei=tTDqU8LOOdGYyAS3q4GADw&usg=AFQjCNFVhpjHOVzTg5yqRJV_UAjLsinQNg - this is a very short definition that has wide ranging implications. Welfare - "aspects of design that engender positive emotional responses". I have never heard of a code official bring this up when developers are building slums waiting to happen.
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Cheryl Khan
I've always thought about this. It's interesting to see people taking the challenge. It takes a lot to do something as life changing at this. Maybe we should all look at this and consider what we can do to help Save the Earth.
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Randall Lichner
After being contacted by a number of people regarding my comment on building a 500 sqft cottage with all the amenities for $25k, I thought I'd throw out the idea of doing a kickstarter to see if there is interest. So, contact me if you might be interested in participating to see how it can be done and possibly getting your hands on the blueprints so you can do it where you are.
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zweiback
"Neat, sweet and petite!"
   
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eclecticedwardian
I would like to see a Tiny House specifically engineered for ADA/ age in place--it is a challenge piled on a challenge, but I would love to see someone tackle it! So if anyone knows of a link for that...... I think it would be OK to use loft space as seasonal storage (assuming someone able bodied would help switch things every 6 months).
I agree about commercial RV/trailer design--much of it is very clever.

I do question some of the costs here--did no one bat an eye about a "$3,000" wood stove? Was that a typo? Even with CA regulations! Also since it is remote controlled, what is it burning? You can find other smaller options (made for boats or trailers) and still get the feeling of flames-- I do think it is too large for the space.
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A Lean
This is called a "comment" section, not a "praise" section. Houzz is supposed to be a forum for design enthusiasts to read and learn and, yes, criticize, the design choices of people who choose to publicly display their homes. As long as it is polite, I think that this sort of discussion is very positive.
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Bonnie Phillips
Vina, I love the design and your ability to silence the unending voices of rules and regulations for our safety! I have argued for years for more efficient homes that eliminate all the pomposity and the wasted space. These plans are hard to find. I am planning a small home on our lake. I can't wait to find more plans like yours to begin work on it.
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sailnmuffin
To all those commenters who say they abhor rules and regulations when applied to themselves: please be mindful that many of those rules and regulations got put in place because someone was killed. I'm not talking about HOA regulations governing what color you can paint your exterior walls; I'm talking about building, electrical, plumbing and sewage codes. Most of them were written in someone's blood. Using the example of electrical systems, much of people's frustration with code requirements and them calling them arbitrary, comes from a lack of understanding about how electricity works. Just today, we finailzed the hookup of the electrical system to our under-construction house, having spent the past 3 months navigating between complex, overlapping and sometimes-conflicting state code and local utility requirements. But 99% of each jurisdiction's requirements make good sense if you understand how to connect wires and create circuits that allow you to run a toaster and a blow dryer at the same time. The 3 utility workers here today were all chuckling at how many people watch an episode of HGTV and think, "How hard can it be to install a ceiling fan?" right before they find themselves on their backs on the floor, having gotten a nice jolt from a hot circuit.
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sailnmuffin
@eclecticedwardian: try Googling something along the line of, "tiny house ada compliant." Here's one link I found to Seattle Tiny Homes, which has lots of details on their various trailer-mounted models. I note that almost all of them have sleeping lofts, though, which seems to contradict the concept of ADA-compliant/ age-in-place. http://seattletinyhomes.com/

Also, here's a start to specifically researching ADA guidelines for small homes. This site has pages featuring house plans as well: http://www.cozyhomeplans.com/ada-guidelines-for-tiny-homes.html/

Enjoy your research!
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tailoru
How can I get one?
   
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gracepoley
great idea, beautiful, functional and environmentally friendly !
   
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Gerald Lorentz
I applaud anyone who can downsize to a small house, trailer, RV, cabin or even a treehouse in a rural environment with a small footprint. This house looks very nice but seems to require a multitude of sacrifices from the fulltime inhabitants. I would've liked something similar when I was at the top of my career as a "retreat" in the woods.

Eight people I know that have taken this unusual route, after a few years of living "off the grid", "isolated from amenities" and "getting in touch with nature", returned to reality and the comforts of modern living in small but well appointed houses.

I just downsized to North Port, Florida to a 1,180ft2 water front house that I call my "last rodeo in fixer-upping." My wife and I find the house cozy and extremely comfortable although it is not finished to our liking as of this date. However, it more than meets all our requirements for "downsizing" with the comforts of all the modern conveniences, and yes, our beloved gadgets.

The point - this lifestyle, independent of your age and economic circumstances, is not a long term arrangement nor can our American desire, or penchant, to live comfortably be met in small spaces.
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maryan01
I luv the 'floating ' shelves. Where do the end fittings come from? Are they readily available?
   
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sailnmuffin
^^^ The floating shelves are stock IKEA: http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/S79929647/
   
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onewingstudio
We have recently sold our 4 bedroom home of 20 years and are building a new home in Topanga CA. First we moved into a double wide trailer home nearby. Downsizing for that was interesting. We both work at home and with my clothing design and mfg. and Tom's electrical Engineering business we were pretty proud of ourselves for honing the stuff into the available space. Permits took longer than expected... Duh! and so we moved again into an even smaller rental, also nearby. Once again we managed to downsize and still function. Permits are still pending so we have moved a third time... Friends say we are troopers. We now live in the basement of the second rental. From three floors to three rooms! Soon we will be living in a trailer on our property. It's a good thing we both like puzzles...
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Susan Kipngeno
What a beautiful small home. Being a lover of "Downtown Abbey" kind of homes, I can actually picture someone living there and living well. Wow! Am impressed.
   
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J Weir Masterworks, Inc.
Kick ass Vina! Great to see you follow an idea and lifestyle you are so passionate about. Blessings. I built one of these tiny homes on Hollister Ranch. Fun.
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DJSquire Designs
Yeah, Vina! A delight to see your tiny place on Houzz. (Wonder-full to visit in person too.)
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Sheila Rumsey
I love this house! In fact, I really like all these little houses. I notice that a lot of middle age women seem to be living in them with the intention to be self-sufficient, off the grid, and age in place. As a nurse, I see problems with that. What happens when you need adaptive equipment or a reliable power or water source? I think these tiny houses present some pretty major obstacles to aging in place. Jump up another 100-200 sf and make sure you have, at least, access to the grid, a septic or sewer system, and rooms/doorways big enough for a walker and wheelchair. Also, sleep on the main floor. Use the loft for younger guests and storage. Add a covered or enclosed porch area for a washing machine, preferably on the same level as the house. And to address the water issues, you can easily use pex plumbing or cpvc pipes, which are much safer than a garden hose. Of course, I grew up drinking from a hose, and my IQ is still just fine!
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Center Stage Interiors
I just read your comment about my clients seeing the whole picture. I must admit, I laughed. There are people out there, believe it or not, that don't know what they like. That's why they hire designers. I had gone round and round with these people and they couldn't visualize anything in the space. They didn't like anything I showed them, and I showed them a lot. I ended up selecting the art work and they were thrilled with the outcome. Most good designers can walk into a space and see it in it's completed state from the onset. Most client's don't have that ability. That is the point I was making. If your clients are different, they don't need you.
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Paul B. Showers
One nice thing about the tiny house movement is the individuality it encourages. I've followed the web site and blogs for years now and people seem to be really vastly improving the designs and livability, tailoring them to their own needs. The tiny house in this article is an accessory building providing an individual with some privacy and "me" space. But... with a storage space AND an Airstream to accommodate her additional needs it surely isn't a complete home. It is beautiful, functional and enviable for sure. It just requires a great deal of support spaces as well to really "live" there.
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sailnmuffin
@Paul B.Showers, I agree. Another advantage of tiny-house building is that it is a great way to get some tool skills, experience in design and construction, and a hands-on education about all the various systems that must come together to create a fully-functional home. As I've said elsewhere, this kind of construction takes a lot of practice to get to the point that you can build a really long-term, fully-liveable space. But it also has the advantage of perhaps convincing some people that DIY building is just not for them -- that their time and their money might be more efficiently spent in a more conventional space, be it large or small. No shame in that; building a dwelling of any size is not as easy as some people might make it look.
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lilion
My only problem with a tiny house is the loft bed. I'd fall out. Or even worse, I'd need to tinkle in the middle of the night, miss the ladder, fall and lose bladder control. Not to mention that I'm just too old and fat to want to climb up to a loft bed in the first place. lol
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Norma Sassone
Exactly, Lillion! - see my comment above.
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lilion
I love the tiny house idea and this one is done very well. I just wish there were more stories on "little" houses, as opposed to "tiny" houses...say 1,000 sq ft or less. Houzz tends toward BIG houses or tiny houses. 1-2 real bedrooms and a real toilet are a must for many people who want to downsize but still need space.
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Sheila Schmitz
Lilion, be sure to check out the Small Homes section under Ideabooks > Home Tours: http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/Small-Homes
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Bob Schulenberg
I notice a trend in some quarters of a kind of neo-Puritanism as a reaction to our current "too much of too much" society. This is a marvelous idea and accomplishment in theoretical terms, beautifully esthetic in a Bauhaus-y "form following function" manner. I'd love to see a down-the-line follow up article seeing how she feels after a decade or so. I notice there is, among many missing items, a paucity of books or an area sufficient to house more than a few. It appears to be a No Nonsense way to live hence my mention of Puritanism. Abstinence = good, worldly possessions = bad!
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Busy Momma
Please tell me there are bed rails in the loft areas. I would be petrified of falling off the bed in the middle of the night! I always wonder that when seeing these tiny homes with loft areas.
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Dhônz Jabinës
Beautiful
   
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Cordy Brown
my favorite tiny house EVER. bookmarked, printed , sent to friends. I hope imitation is truly flattering in this case because I intend to copy much. Maybe I should pay the woman for her design? that is of course if I ever get on with the building - no justt the dreaming.
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Nanette Francis
This is my favorite photo. I *love* the built-in desk! absolutely marvelous.
I do wonder why she bothers to put guests up above the desk, instead of just letting them sleep on the couch.
   
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Nanette Francis
two things about this picture bother me ... no railing or safety barrier across the front edge of the loft ... and the woodburning store being so close to the curtain and wall, etc. without a protective covering.
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lilion
It appears to me that the fireplace is gas, which may not get hot on the outside? If so, it's decorative only I guess?
   
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ALEXANDRE GINNSZ
How do you get power and internet service? Why did you (apparently) opt out of solar panels? They've become so cheap (check "Renogy" on Amazon.com).

Would this house work in a colder environment?



Thanks
   
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Nanette Francis
@ Alexandre Ginnsz -- She has solar panels. The text next to the picture of the black heating stove says that "trees on the property partially shade the solar panels, so she has to conserve her energy consciously". She plans to either move them or buy more.
Thank you for the heads-up about the solar panels on Amazon! :)
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lothatch
Love this for a weekend escape but cannot imagine full time living. Being in New England this would not work in the winter. Enjoyed the various comments as well.
   
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dreamdoctor
Alexandre - even though it is well-built and well-insulated it has a high surface area to volume ratio so the more extreme the environment the harder the heater has to work. This is true to a degree in all homes but the smaller the footprint/volume the more the relative surface area. These types of abodes are suited to the Bohemian lifestyle - having the outdoors as your living room as much as possible - happy and healthy in other words.
   
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Kathy Dunn
See the information above about utilities:

"All the electricity comes from four batteries fed by three solar panels. A 7-gallon propane tank provides a fuel source for a fireplace, stove and hot-water heater. The only utility she pays for is water, fed to the house by a garden hose."
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astraea
First thing that caught my attention, was that the building was constructed on a trailer, rather than foundation, which is not only a loophole for building codes, but for taxes as well. Don't people who live in tiny houses depend on the same emergency services, schools & hospitals as the rest of us .. which are supported by our property taxes?!

Curious about the handling of waste water & toilet; didn't see it mentioned .. maybe I missed it?

I think it might be a little short-sighted to think this could be anyone's "forever house"; who'd want to be climbing up to a sleeping loft with low headroom, and down to the bathroom in the middle of the night .. when they're in their 70s & beyond?! And how do you manage with any injuries or conditions, that prevent you from making that climb?
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Katy Jordan
Sometimes the questions posed by commenters make me go back and reassess my initial reaction to the articles, and that's a good thing. What's not good - at all - are the commenters whose sole purpose is to point out how this or that doesn't work for them. Well, thanks for the info and all, but no one cares. It's not your home, so how does whether it works for you matter to anyone else? If it doesn't work for you, don't comment, unless the reason it doesn't work is something universal, like one of the things mentioned here several times - the ladder to the loft. That is a valid point for anyone reading this article, and forces the reader to think more. For instance, although I personally paused for a moment over the water hose issue, I didn't really know why (except that maybe, as someone who drank out of the hose as a kid, I remembered that nearly metallic taste and the fact that the water temperature was in direct relation to the heat of the day). Commenters who provided info on lead content and off-gassing helped propel the conversation or issues to consider. Just saying, "This is too small, no way I could live there" does nothing to further a discussion and just comes across as cranky. Asking valid questions - where/how DOES she do laundry, for instance - is helpful to anyone considering making this kind of change.
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RegularClouds
While I agree in principle with what you're saying here Katy Jordan, I will say that, perhaps, I'm not seeing some comments being as critical as you may be seeing them. For example, if I had a structure on display and somebody said, as you mentioned, how it would never work for them, I would look at this as an opportunity to further think through the whole thing. Would what they brought up be an issue for me, something I had not considered, as well? I guess it is all in how you interpret it. Often when you're reading the written word you miss the gestures, the intonation....personally I welcome all comments. I can sift through and mentally eliminate those that don't help me. Perhaps they'll be helpful to someone else.
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kathleenemurphy
This is a perfect example of how one does not need to completely compromise on design, comfort and function and was inspirational to see. I love what's going on in the tiny house movement, and this is a wonderful example of what you can do with such limited space. Thanks for sharing this story.
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PRO
Sol Haus Design
Hello everyone! My name is Vina and I'm the owner and designer of this Tiny Home. I really appreciate all of your comments (positive and negative) - it makes for a lively and healthy discussion! It has been more than one year since I moved into my teeny abode, and I can say with confidence that I am still content in my home. In fact, I grow to love my home more each day. Downsizing and simplifying is not as scary as you may think.

This way of living is certainly not for everyone, but I have found more freedom and meaning in the way that I live my personal and professional life. I encourage anyone curious about this movement to research as much as you can, and to take baby steps along the way. The process is transformative and incredibly rewarding. You can read more on my thoughts here: https://madmimi.com/s/f38c25

Many have asked burning questions about how I manage to live in my sardine size dwelling... in the next comments section I will address many of them.
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Sol Haus Design
Here are some answers to your questions. You can also refer to my website for more info: http://www.solhausdesign.com/tiny-house.

LADDER: Thank you for your concern about climbing a ladder as I age in my later years. I am now 49 years old and have no problems climbing it. I believe with continued exercise to challenge my body, I will remain more healthy as I age. When I get sick and don't feel like climbing the ladder (as it's already happened), I sleep on my custom sofa/bed for several nights in a row. It is comfortable enough to fit even my boyfriend and I (very snuggly). Maybe in the future, I may build a second tiny house or tiny office that will have a bed on the lower floor. That's the beauty of this concept, it allows flexibility for change.

LAUNDRY: I currently go to the laundromat to wash my clothes. It's not convenient, but this was what I did when I've rented guesthouses too. Living tiny allows me to be more engaged with my community, and I see this as a positive aspect. My tiny house also allows me to rent a small office space in downtown Ojai because my expenses are reduced. The money I save on a mortgage and utilities provide the freedom to make meaningful choices.

UTILITIES: My solar panels provide electrical power for my small refrigerator, LED lights, laptop, and other small fixtures (ceiling fan, blender, juicer, etc). I have 3 panels with 750watt and 4 batteries. My solar consultant expert will have to give you more technical details ;). For cold days with minimal solar access, I plug into an electrical outlet from my boyfriend's cabin. My greywater is a simple system with RV rated garden hose, lead free with a filter for safe potable water. Propane tanks power for my gas fireplace, tankless hot water heater, 2 burner stove.

I DID BUILD MY HOME: I worked on all aspects of the construction alongside my boyfriend and other friends/ carpenters. Doing much of the construction allowed me to cut costs, and for my profession, I really wanted to learn construction by doing. There is photobook available on my website that documents the construction from beginning to end.

INSURANCE: Yes, my tiny home IS insured! It's provided by Darrell Grenz Insurance in Portland.

FAVORITE COMMENT: "If she has a falling out with her boyfriend, she can take her house & leave." .... My boyfriend's response: "What they don't know is that I own the truck that tows her house." I'm still laughing :)

Thank you so much for interest in my teeny tiny abode. I'm thrilled that there is so much interest in tiny/ small dwellings, even better when it's good for the environment. I'm hopeful it's a sign of more to come.
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dreamdoctor
A smaller footprint is a commitment and not always easy - nothing worth doing is. Try going vegan - about the same level of commitment in this country - with about the same level of benefits. Yes, exercise makes living, and living longer with a good quality of life, very attainable. You can watch sports on TV, while you eat your wings dipped in heart attack or you can get some exercise and take good care of your body and enjoy your old age. Take charge of your life like Vina; having a thick skin sure helps.
   
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RegularClouds
Thanks for answering my question about laundry, but it only raises more questions (or one was left out) You take your laundry to the Laundromat. Where do you store dirty clothes in there. And where are the fresh clean clothes? Not to be overly inquisitive but how much clothing do you have? I don't see much room for more than a couple pair of shoes, couple of outfits. VERY curious about clothing storage, both clean and dirty. THANKS
   
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greta1
regularclouds, the article states her clothes hamper is in the cabinet with the pantry, the wardrobe closet has hanging space and drawers, and you can see she stores her shoes on the shelves under her desk.
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Ariane Morales
Soooo very pretty little thing ❤️❤️❤️‼️
   
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patatas
To have a house on wheels, which can be very important, it has to be this small, and she did a fantastic job designing it!

Otherwise, I'm in the "why not just do 1,000 sq feet" camp.
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maba2
No this is not necessary you obviously like your luxury why pretend I mean there is laptop how off the grid could you be there are apartments in cities smaller than this abode. Nothing humble about it.
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dreamdoctor

maba2 - I mean why not use tree bark for plates right? "Everyone thinks of their fleas as gazelles." It sets an example that is headed in the right direction. Do you live in one of those apartments? I'm striving towards veganism - I have a lot of history and habits to deal with but I feel i'm headed in the right direction as well.


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therdj

Love it and I want one of my own here in Georgia.

   
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cmjoell56

This is one of the best designed tiny houses I've seen, especially for this super tiny square footage. It doesn't look cramped at all. It actually looks spacious. I can see why this would be great for entertaining as well as every day living and even working from home!

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Lydia Ney

This is perfect if you have a bigger lot in the urban areas for undesirable guest.


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Bob Henry

At 65 with a very bad knee I too am a tiny house person. I built a 8 x 20 caboose. The cupalo up top stores my bed during the day and is lowered by a small manual winch to the main floor for sleeping. Being a bachelor, this way I never really have to make my bed (grin) The underside of the bed is utilized as a 3 compartment horizontal closet for hanging clothes. They swing down to access and are shoved back horizontal to the "closed" position.

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a1970girl

A bed that is lowered to the floor for sleeping is an idea I could wrap my head around. I can actually see myself in a tiny house with that concept.


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reych80
Beautiful! I super love it! Wish to have one someday.
   
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Sheila Schmitz

Bob, please upload a photo of your caboose house. We'd love to see it!

   
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Bob Henry


HOW ABOUT THE ENTIRE BUILD DIARY ? http://tnttt.com/viewtopic.php?f=48&t=47804

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vegasrenie

While I think that they're fascinating, tiny houses aren't for everyone. I have my hobbies, prefer my own laundry, and like large pets and to stretch out, tiny houses aren't for me. In my world, anything under 1000 sq. ft. is a tiny house.

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Malgorzata Ksiazka

to jest super pomysl





   
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Manijeh Sohrabpour

WUENDASCHÖN

   
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pengbears

can you tell me the manufacturer/model of the stainless kitchen sink? its perfect!!

   
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Peg
Am I missing something? I can't imagine she's had anyone take up the offer to use the guest loft above the desk. Roll over in your sleep and you're toast. The article says she met "most building codes" so maybe there's a pop up railing that I can't see...
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myami67

How can she say she is living in a tiny house when she has TWO offsite storage units?

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Robin
This is my favorite tiny house of all time.
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Ava Swimmer
I would love to know how to obtain a blue print for this house
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Sol Haus Design

Hello Ava- Thank you for your interest. You can purchase my plans on my website: http://www.vinastinyhouse.com/plans/design-plans/

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Manijeh Sohrabpour

sehrschön

   
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Ross Del Prado

Oh wow...I'm from the Philippines too..I just love your tiny house I been looking at the photos many times!

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dreamdoctor

Ross - if you want a system that will stand up to the Philippines maybe consider the system and plans I have developed. Highly resistant to all manner of building maladies (mold/mildew/rot/insects etc) and it is DIY friendly and affordable while being maintenance free and high-performance. dreemgreenhomes.com under "manufactured". Not too rain on the parade of the home shown but wood and hot/humid do not go well together. This system uses culvert grade, galvanized, corrugated steel and structure often used for boat repair. Works as well at the south pole, dessert or jungle.



   
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Sofia Volosatova
Your house is amazing.I like how you put the bed on top giving you more space.I just really like it.
   
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therdj

Vina! Every year I watch this video to get inspired and remind myself of the freedom that awaits! Your home is practical, affordable, mobile and fits all my needs. Thank You for the inspiration!