Houzz TV: Love Reclaimed Wood? Here’s How to Work With It

Houzz TV: Love Reclaimed Wood? Here’s How to Work With It

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Houzz TV: Love Reclaimed Wood? Here’s How to Work With It

Raun Meyn is a third-generation craftsman. His material of choice? Reclaimed wood. He uses it to make desks, tables, dressers, beds, bookcases, accent walls and more, a lot of which can be found in his Chicago home. In this video, Meyn shares tips and tricks for finding and selecting a good piece of reclaimed wood.

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Johnson & Johnson Architecture

Great video! Thanks Houzz for producing such interesting videos. Old growth wood is very important. The California Historic Building Code allows doubling the structural strength of old growth lumber (compared to current wood) . Additionally, termites hate old growth. The tighter grain is harder for them to eat. I have seen countless old houses where a repair has been made and the termites leave the old portion alone and devour the new wood. Old growth also resist wood decay better. When building or repairing doors and windows, it is worth the additional cost of old growth. Doors and windows typically have a greater weather exposure and their movement demands better, tighter joints.

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janicegloer14830

Here I am in Corning, NY with one inch 150 year old barn wood to give away....

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AW67
The beam in our kitchen is what attracted us to buy our house. It was salvaged from an old mill 40 yrs ago. When we finally remodeled the kitchen 20 yrs later we gutted to the studs and designed around the beam.
   
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rikere

really like the skinny mantel. i suppose someone made the brackets for that. I have a nice board of old walnut -1850-from ancestors house but havent done anything with it

   
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leskruth

Old wood, particularly barn/farm wood, has often been treated with pesticides or preservatives over the years (remember Chloridane (sp?)! Toxic stuff and readily available in the 1950s; and DDT!). We have a lot of old wood but have now decided to dedicate it to building anything outside, including siding, as opposed to eating off of it or sleeping next to it. The one exception is the wood from an old redwood water tank--2" thick!-- and stunning once it is refinished. It is old growth, but we knew where it came from! Just something to think about....

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shainesus

"Hey, Houzzers". Love it. :)

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suede57

Great video, thanks! Can I ask you Raun or anyone .... what would be your choices as far as using the least toxic, most durable, finishing products?

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Veronica Mensch

We want 100 year old pine to not only match what was used in our home but to also replicate the original trim that is still the majority of the wood in the house, (picture trim like this but not painted). Finding old pine we can afford is an issue. Loved the video.


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