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yvonneleslie

We built our home & I chose engineered wood flooring for our foyer, club room, great room/kitchen/dining room. I chose a maple and so far I absolutely love it. Our furniture is rosewood with some teak pieces & it’s a great compliment to our furniture. We have a large area rug in the great room & another rug under our dining room table. I have arthritis & the engineered wood is gentler on my knees than tile. I run the vacuum once a week, Swiffer once a week & clean with Bona for wood floors every few weeks.
We dog sit our sons 2 dogs & our 3 year old granddaughter loves running through the house. I’m very pleased.

   
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Lois Winstock

We have a flat roof on our Georgian-style new-build due to height restrictions. Given my aversion to bulkheads, radiant hydronic underfloor heating was the only option. It was installed throughout the house, including the basement and garage (which uses glycol). Pex tubing was laid over concrete and covered in thinset. I love solid, hardwood floors, which we had in our previous house, but they are unsuitable in radiant-heated floors. Thus, engineered hardwood flooring was glued to the concrete over our four floors, including the basement. Since my husband was tired of oak and wanted wide planked floors, we chose Preverco’s birch, 5” wide planks, with a custom matte, brushed cappuccino finish that compliments our transitional/traditional decor. Birch is a softer wood - radiant-heating floors require softer woods - but I haven’t found that it dents any more than does solid hardwood, and we have had both a dog and numerous cats. We don’t wear shoes in our house, nor is it the custom to do so in our part of the world - why anyone would wear high heals in a house is beyond me. It does scratch, but so does solid hardwood. I put felt pads on the bottom of my chairs. I have a can of custom-matched stain, and I intend to stain the scratches using either a fine artist’s brush or a feather (I’m pretty crafty) when I can stomach the thought of crawling around on the floor. Matte finishes do show dust more than shinier finishes; I should have insisted on the satin finish I preferred! The concrete floors provide almost complete sound barriers between floors, and there are no creaks! I refused to accept that engineered floors can’t be wet-mopped, given that they’re supposed to be so stable and hard-finished - after all, the cleaning solution Preverco sells is a concentrated liquid that is supposed to be mixed with water and sprayed on. So, I wet-mop my floors using an O’Cedar spin mop and water mixed with a few squirts of Dr. Meyer’s lemon liquid soap, and my floors come out clean, in their original finish, without any clouding, cupping, splitting or staining, and with a lovely citrus scent. I have ceiling fans in all my bedrooms, which I turn to help dry the floors more quickly. I have large area rugs in my formal rooms and two of my four bedrooms, and do not notice any difference in heat dispersal in those rooms from the others that have smaller throw, or no, rugs. We have auxiliary heat in the ceilings of the formal rooms, in any event, because of their size, which undoubtedly helps to even out the heat throughout the house. I have a problem with the assertion that rugs interfere with radiant heat; once the rug heats up to the same temperature as the floor, it will radiate that heat, as well. Of course, electric radiant heat has different issues. Our HVAC system is connected to our home automation, so almost every room is a discrete heating zone. The upper two floors have a high velocity A/C system, while the ground floor and basement share a forced air A/C system. We have a humidifier attached to the forced air blower that runs year round and manages to humidify the whole house (still don’t understand how that works). It all seems quite complicated, and our mechanical room looks like it belongs in a ship, but it works well, is incredibly efficient and costs half as much to run as our previous house that was one-third the size, and our engineered floors appear to be holding their own. Reading about everyone’s problems filled me with dread, so I hope my story brings some comfort to readers.

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janet arneson

One advantage: If you are a minimalist when it comes to furnishings. you can avoid the "echo" that tile gives off by putting in engineered floors -- no "echo," the wood absorbs sounds.

   

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