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kdianan

omg I have the same thing! Did u find a solution?

   
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mi2ct

To knoxranch and others with very narrow tree lawns: If you opt for concrete or stone pavers, they don't have to be all of one kind. As with tile or hardwood patterns in a long hallway, you could set 2 or more types in a regular, geometric pattern or inset a long curving line in some contrasting material -- in a style appropriate to your house or overall neighborhood. If neighbors cooperate, these pesky little strips can define your block or area with a low-maintenance but beautiful feature that can be lifted & re-laid when necessary. For example, designing a signature concrete stepping stone for everyone with some symbol [example: your town's official tree leaf or other feature that echos the area's name or having your house numbers appear there in the same large font]. Commercial and historic districts often do this, but neighbors ± scout troups & schools could get together and create a festival event of fund-raising, making these stepping stones together, helping each other with installation, and celebrating the project's completion. Or perhaps just seeing what you do for your home will inspire others, one by one.

   
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leandro_cifuentes
On my parking strip I planted potentilla with light yellow flowers and dwarf barberry. The yellow flowers contrast against the red foliage of the barberry. The area gets plenty of sunshine so these plants tolerate it plus they are drought tolerant also. My city owns the area but I'm expected to take care of it.
   
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