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Blue Wren

@Malcolm Russell I feel your pain. I have no problem with them producing an upmarket line, but if it's at the expense of their original charter of producing quality design on a budget then that is certainly a very retroactive step. When I look at the amazing things that are going on in the tiny house movement I have hope that common sense will return to creating simple homes that are beautiful and functional and that don't have to be enormous and full of cheap bling to make them liveable.

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footprintsteve

Steve

@steve_footprint Blue and Malcom I'm with you both. The reality is that our homes, properties, and I will even say our countries are simply a commodity on the open market to foreign investors. They don't care about home sweet home, the welcome mat, nor where we have to move to, to find affordable housing. We work with our city planners, to design Smart homes for density and affordability. We put on the market homes that we know we can sell for much more, but placed on the market to meet our commitment. Many a times to be viewed as chumps when at a future date of the project, these homes are sold (re-branded) at 3-4x's the selling price or faced at 3-4x's the rental rate. Yet those who asked us to produce density and affordability cant protect the intent of our product in the after market.

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Dave Conrad

What a great home and informative article. well done Camille and Alchemy! Somehow the comments veered off into a diatribe on affordable housing. There's several factors that stood out to me like the owner's occupations, the location (Sonoma County, its a wine capital!), the acreage, the view, and materials. If you're looking for an affordable house, you would make adjustments accordingly. No steel, no crane, no walls of glass, etc. Labor: some skilled trades and crafts people are paid really well, some are undocumented workers who may be paid below the poverty line.


If you're looking for modern affordable homes, look up Auburn’s College of Architecture, or any arch school really. Also, in the US, there's HUD programs, including Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) and FHA Housing Tax Credit. Where I live, where the local population is 1.3 million, there are at least 2 homeconstruction programs that I'm aware of for low-income residents who meet min/max income requirements and credit scores. There's also financial literacy and readiness programs offered by the city. Each city/state has their own HUD funding. If you're not low-income, and you just want to purchase a tiny or smaller home, to be built to your specifications, then find out what's available locally or in your region! Talk to a lender, talk to builders, designers, architects, etc. Getting a consultation is usually free. They're all going to have resources at their disposal who they can refer you to. I hope that for every complaint there will be a dozen who take action to better their living situation.

   

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