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Lois Winstock
Sorry, the photos got moved around in the posting.
   
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Lois Winstock
Reposting...

We just tore down our 107-year-old, carpenter ant- and mouse- infested house. The guest bathroom in the new build will be black and white. It isn’t a Iarge room, by any means: only 10’10.5” x 5’4”. I note that the countertops in the bathrooms shown in this article are all quite plain, but I love interesting stones. Our countertop and tub surround will be fashioned from the Mari White granite slab, pictured below. The walls will be tiled in a white, bevelled, matte subway tile to the height of a decorative chair rail, which will be black. Baseboard tiles will also be black. Ceramic cournice mouldings at the nine-foot ceiling will be white (but I might incorporate a black bead). The sink cabinet and a wall cabinet will probably be black, perhaps a black-stained oak. I want to use the leaded glass transoms from the original house, shown below, as doors in the wall cabinet (I have three large, and four small transoms). Since they are framed in oak, that is where I got the idea of using black-stained oak cabinetry for this room. Shall have to see if it works. It will have to be very, very dark. Cabinet hardware would be matte black, perhaps with a metal trim to match the door and window hardware in the house (haven’t decided yet on it - maybe oiled bronze, or brushed nickel, or even black). Toilet, sink and tub will be white; fixtures (faucets, taps, shower head, towel holders, and shower door slider) will be matte black. The tub enclosure will be tiled to the cournice moulding, of course, that will continue around the room. The sink backsplash will be the Mari White granite, which will also frame the set-in medicine cabinet, but I’m not sure about the front of the bathtub - perhaps it should just be black. Lighting will combine pots, a pendant, and matching sconce of some kind over the medicine cabinet. The floor is a matter of debate. I found this fabulous Italian glass mosaic that can be used on both floors and walls, shown, and I would love to use it on the floor and back wall of the niche - if I don’t faint at the cost! I also like a larger-format white with black basket weave, but my husband doesn’t, although he does like the white and black dot, shown. Further negotiations are needed! A subtle black and white wallpaper, white towels with black trim, and a simple white window blind will round out the room. I shall post photos of the finished room, but you’ll have to give me 16 months!
   
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Lois Winstock
Sorry for doubling up! I have a love/hate relationship with computers!
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