Comments (112)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Mark Krosse

many years ago i went to raised bed (4x8), square foot planting for my OCD herb fetish (see attached layout also showing Annual/Tender Perennial/Hardy for NE Ohio Zone 5). It has ornamental, medicinal, in addition to culinary. From experience i have moved the big guys (eg. Lovage, Rhubarb, Sorrel) into the main garden (to florish amongst grasses, Joe Pye weed, etc. etc. as an homage to Piet Oudolf philosophy). It helps to have a good herb source nearby, ie Gilbertie's in Westport CT or Quailcrest Farm near Wooster OH [or UPS]. I save seeds from the 'bolters' for biweekly succession seeding the next year, eg. cilantro, dill, chervil, bronze fennel). I have found that the "thugs" can be managed by shears and spade or a pot sunk in the ground with its bottom cut off (i'm talkin' 'bout you, Mr. Mint). Some "perennials", eg. sage, are hit or miss survivors over the Zone 5 winter in NE Ohio. Some winter survivors are biennials, eg. parsley, which need spring removal year two, and replanting with a new youngling (sorry Ms Parsley). Some of the nicer Tender peeps I keep in a sunk pot in their proper grid place to be brought indoors over the winter. (Bay, Rosemary, & some cool tender ornamentals)......as you can see in the layout, some of the 64 grid spaces are now shared by some additional squatters......because of my OCD, i can't say "No". I have also found chives to be a great 'grassy' ground cover, by deadheading & sowing the seed heads, that can thrive under large maple trees where other plantings such as liorope get stunted for lack of water & nutrients)

5 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Andrea Pellicani

Luke- depends on the zone. In zone 17 my Lemon Balm didn't spread at all, in zone 6 it spread a little , the herb that took over most was horehound. Now I'm experimenting in zone 9.

And I really like greek oregano, it's a gorgeous perennial here on the coast.

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Skipp Design

Planting some common sage today!

   

Related Stories

Edible Gardens Remake Your Backyard Into a Mini Farm
You can get a taste of country life by line-drying your laundry, growing some produce or going whole hog with the critters
Full Story
Edible Gardens Summer Crops: How to Grow Beans
Grow your own beans for amazing variety and healthy, convenient produce all summer
Full Story
Houseplants How to Grow Herbs Indoors
Have a sunny window? Enjoy the flavor of fresh herbs year-round by growing them in the house
Full Story
Gardening 101 8 Surefire Vegetables and Herbs for Beginning Urban Gardeners
Learn the edible plants that are popular and easy to grow in a backyard or container garden
Full Story
Farm Your Yard 8 Last-Minute Additions to a Summer Edible Garden
Been dawdling in summer’s delightful slowness? It’s not too late to get these vegetables and herbs going
Full Story
Cool-Season Crops 11 Favorite Edibles for Your Cool-Season Garden
Plant crunchy carrots, crisp radishes, tender peas and other vegetables for fall and spring harvests
Full Story
Farm Your Yard Edible Gardening Essentials: Watering Tips Worth Soaking Up
To give your edibles just what they need, get water-wise with these guidelines for how, when and how much
Full Story
Summer Gardening 12 Edibles Perfect to Plant in Late Summer
Keep those home-grown vegetables and greens coming even as summer wanes and cooler temperatures arrive
Full Story
Shop Houzz June’s Bestselling Oversized Rugs
By Houzz
These popular styles will make a big impression in your design
See Products
Shop Houzz Top Outdoor Gifts Under $199
By Houzz
Present your nearest and dearest with dining accessories, games, decor and more
See Products