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Nancy Nygaard

Great article. Like you, I have learned so much from gardening. We live in the Midwest in a rural area. We are surrounded by prairie and woods in a beautiful development located off the Great River Road which was voted the most scenic drive in America.

I love planting native plants along with non-native plants. I've had good success with both. I now have four flower gardens that are mostly maintenance free. I have flowers in bloom in three seasons - winter is too harsh here in Wisconsin for any flowers to bloom. I love some of the naturalized gardens people have shared here and I want to try some of that in the prairie. I am considering liatris and cone flowers for now to see how they do. If that goes well I will add other native plants which I can purchase at a local nursery.


This garden is mixed. I have planted Russian Sage, day lilies, yellow double blooming roses and deep pink climbing roses. The latest addition is an anchor planting - a hybred Magnolia tree created to withstand the harsh winters in the Midwest. This garden is a favorite of many varities of birds that stop in to bathe in the birdbath.

In the butterfly garden I have planted liatris, multiple colors and varities of cone flowers, daylilies, and a weeping crabapple as an anchor planting. The prairie, seen in the background, is home to a wide varity of wildlife including multiple varities of birds. My favorites are the Pheasants, and the Bluebirds. Nest boxes attract Bluebird mates and they return year after year.


We put in this new outdoor living space at the end of last summer. We need to see how it fills in this summer before adding any new plants to the area. I would like to plant more native plants in this area.

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Nancy Nygaard

Benjamin, I really enjoy all of your articles on gardening. Thank you for sharing your insights with us.

I forgot to tell you that our area is loaded with Monarch Butterflies due to the variety of wildflowers that are planted by God's beautiful creatures. We have milkweed in abundance growing on the the undeveloped lots all around us - there are many acres of open space. I also allow it to grow in my flower gardens because it's a butterfly magnet!



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D C

I LOVE this article! I feel exactly the same about my yard and gardening but you put it in a way that I couldn't. Kudos to you.

   

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