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rosiegirl2
This is a really good read! Two years ago we launched into a whole home reno which included taking down a wall that separated our narrow country kitchen from our living room. The reno was completed just before Christmas and I remember being totally stressed out to suddenly be “on display” as I made our Christmas dinner in full view of our extended family. But here are some things I’ve learned:

1. Having an open concept kitchen/living/dining means people are more apt to pitch in. Let them!

2. I can keep a better eye on things in the oven or on the stove while I enjoy a glass of wine with my guests in the living area

3. We put our (only) TV downstairs in our media room and don’t regret it for a minute! When our family and friends are together, we prefer to visit unless it’s a really important game, and then we are all watching downstairs and the kitchen is quiet except for the chicken wings sizzling!!

4. Open concept means the cook(s) do not miss out on the action. Even our newest generation who is only 9 months has become involved in tasting, stirring, and mixing.

I do believe that open concept is not for everyone nor for every house. But for our family, it has been wonderful!!
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Julia Mack Design, LLC

I love this article and the dialog that accompanies it. Yes, an open kitchen means that you need to be fastidious about the mess that you make but it is good to learn to cook & clean simultaneously. At the end of a meal, nobody want to clean a messy kitchen, not even you who made the mess in the 1st place.


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rosiegirl2
I have to say that I don’t really understand the need to be super fastidious. Entertaining with an open concept just naturally lends itself to being a bit like Christmas morning...no matter how organized you try to be, in the end, it always looks like a bomb went off. But that’s what I mean about people lending a hand. There is no place to hide a lot of dirty pots even in an extra deep sink so I find that my friends and family usually hop in to fill the sink and wash up a bit, or clear the table often while I’m getting the dessert ready and making tea and coffee.

This means that I am not stuck slaving in the closed-off kitchen feeling like a servant instead of a host. I understand that style of entertaining may not be for everyone, but we have dinner/brunch at our house every few weeks and helping in the kitchen doesn’t seem to be a deterrent for our guests!
   

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