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PRO
Durham Designs & Consulting, LLC

I just don't care for rooms without the lighting turned on. They are gloomy and to me uninviting. Soft, warm lighting attracts my eye first to a photo.

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PRO
Durham Designs & Consulting, LLC

I've taken the time to read most of these comments and Jan Moyer, you and I think so alike. Rooms that appear naked do not allow for most homeowners to "imagine" themselves in the room, because they aren't designers. I've had a couple of clients who could not make a decision on even the color of their washer and dryer because they are incapable to seeing anything in their home until it is installed. A visual that makes a room feel livable is far more inviting than a starkly, under designed room. For years I worked with a local builder and developer with their floor plans and model homes. Had I not been involved there were open plans that did not allow for anything other than one pair of chairs on an angle in the family room. Eventually, after my insisting they examine the floor plan a temporary framing was erected and I proved my point. Even the builder couldn't imagine the space on paper.

Why on earth would anyone expect a prospective buyer to imagine living in a home that has been stripped clean of all personal photos, rugs, etc.

   
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Diane Barry

I am always shocked when I see real estate listings that use poor quality photos....blurry, out of focus shots...bad camera angles...rooms so dark you can barely make out what is inside....etc, etc. I'll add a pet peeve that may lie more on the seller than the agent but photos of bathrooms with toilet lids and even the seats up are a huge turnoff. Photos of clutter (including kitchen sinks full of dirty dishes, counters covered with junk, tables with piles of mail, unmade beds, piles of dirty laundry on the floor etc) are another turnoff.

Agents must understand that virtually everyone nowadays does his/her research online. Great photos can make the difference between getting showings or being passed over. They should all use photographers who understand this and will take the high quality shots that attract buyers. So don't take shaky, off-balanced pictures with your cell phone and use them in your listings! The money spent on getting those sharp, color-balanced and well-lit photos is worth the little bit extra cost.

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