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Sandy Guenther

Thanks. It should be fun. I am actually getting burnished slate....because of the color of my house. It was that or replace it with the current red that I have now. But I am adding radiant barrier. I wanted to go lighter but didn't want to change my paint color on the house. My neighbor chose a light stone roof color. I think the city will reject....but ultimately I think the city will lose. But they will delay I am sure. :-)

   
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Josh Wynne Construction

Your local municipality should not be dictating roof color, except that they may have an energy efficiency/ reflective value requirement. In that case, I would simply specify an Energy Star rated roofing product. There are several manufacturers that make a high reflectivity glavlaume roof that is Energy Star rated. If you do not feel like a fight, look into a Kynar finished roof assembly in an Energy Star color.


As dreamdoctor pointed out, there is a difference between reflectivity and emissivity but I have never seen an emissivity requirement for a residential project.

   
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dreamdoctor

Municipalities have been known to specify/dictate many things - here we have a compatibility zoning regulation. Your house has to be compatible with the other existing homes - kind of like a city wide HOA (very subjective to non-design based people) - which means it can be incredibly builder ugly or boring but heaven forbid it should be world class design - wouldn't go with the mediocrity. We have a street here with modernist homes on one side and ranches on the other - that is compatible - but corrugated metal siding is deemed incompatible if near traditional. On commercial it is OK but not residential.

I am not so much concerned about what is required but more of what works. If you want your attic/home to stay cool in the summer and also have less wear and tear on materials (expansion/contraction) use a roofing color/material that has a higher visible light reflectance and high emissivity - and of course vent it correctly and beyond what you might think is adequate.

   

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