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Susan Mills Design
I never actually wrote the word kerfuphal, it's even more profound in print! Kerfuphal, yes indeed!
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gardenridgegirl
All architects are biased. I can't even count how many times I've been in a structure that was gorgeous, yet did not function well for the people who inhabit it. So nice to know I spent all that time learning to pick pillows. A Licensed or Certified Interior Designer is well informed in all areas of construction. Including codes, structural issues, budgets and scheduling; as well as being able to produce blue prints. A good designer keeps in mind the use if the structure. We spend several years in education and training just like architects. I personally have designed and supervised commercial and residential projects without even speaking to an architect. I work with a structural engineer. You want a structure that's beautiful to look at call an architect. You want a structure that truly works for the purpose it was built. Do your research and hire a licensed or certified Interior Designer. We do ALOT more than fluff the pillows and pick paint colors.
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Design Studio International
gardenridgegirl, To be sure, not all architects can conceive/produce a structure that's beautiful to look at. And not all interior designers can or will do what you've been doing - designing a structure that really works for the purpose it was built. Let's say that, for argument's sake, that all architects care only about beauty and making a statement and all interior designers care about how the space will be used. But doesn't this leave a big gap - a structure that's beautiful to look at AND also truly works for the purpose it was built? A client should NOT have to choose between these two objectives because if they only get one of the two, than they have not received the best possible value for their investment. And by the way, as a CKD (Certified Kitchen Designer) I do exactly what you do, designing custom kitchens, baths, additions, entire homes,etc., working with structural engineer or an architect of record on certain size projects. Again, that does not mean that everyone with the CKD or similar accreditation wants the challenge of the much larger jobs. It has been my experience in over 30 years that architects make very poor collaborators, with the clients being the losers. Unfortunately, I don't see this situation changing anytime soon. It will take a while, but I hope that eventually, through a lot of exposure to good and great design, the clients will become more articulate and demanding of the professionals they hire, so in the end they get a structure that is beautiful to look at AND truly works for the purpose it was built.
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