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Dina Taylor

I live in South Africa which has an electricity crisis (due to no maintenance of existing plants over the past 20 years, backlog in development of new power plants, endless stories of corruption) with regular electricity cuts (not great in a country known for its crime rate, plus huge negative impact on our economy) and high electricity rate increases anticipated for many years to come. I have always been keen on 'going green', and installed a hot water solar geyser and rainwater tank some 4 years ago. I am also worried about the long term rising costs of electricity. Ideally, I would like to install solar panels to power my alarm system, kitchen, TV and wireless internet, with a system that can work both on and off the Eskom grid. If any S. African Houzzers have installed photovoltaic panels, please would you let me know about your experience? Do you have installers you can recommend? What should a budget of around R50,000 cover?

   
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Shoshana Bloom

I live in Israel where all houses and buildings have solar heating. It is mainly for heating water but can be had for all heating at an extra cost. There is a switch to change over to electricity on cloudy days. My electricity costs are very low. I have also changed over all my light bulbs to energy efficient and only have lights on in the room I am in. Cooking is by gas which I have always used wherever I have lived.

   
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Josh
Insurance will go up a few bucks a month maybe $6 on average. Because it is simply because your home is more valuable.

This is in the new 2018 appraisal manual.
There is an algorithm but let’s just say about half the price of system before tax credit 17,000 was mentioned a lot. So home value increased 8,500.

If a tornado hits your house it’ll take out the Solar too. In general a professional job increases the life of the roof underneath because it protects it from the elements.

Energy continues to go up in the range of 3-6% a year. Someone mentioned a$86 average of savings let’s try some simple math with that. Electric bill goes from $386 down to $300
In 5 years $386 ends up being $472 then your average is $172 per month
10 years is $559 = $259
The savings isn’t now it’s watching the energy
continue to increase. It’s based off the cost of coal.
I work for ARROWPIONT Solar. We do a 20 year loan we pay to extend the factory warranty to 25 years for the hole system.

Your payment never goes up but guaranteed that electric will.
   

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