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Ann

DC, mine is still quite small too, but very healthy looking. We have heavy clay also.

I had two of them and kept one. I love the grass, but one of mine got too wet from the sprinkler and flopped rather than staying upright, so I replaced that one with Karl Forester. Mine comes up early, but then remains quite small (but pretty) until mid summer when it takes off (being a late season grass). So, if you need a grass that get its height early, Karl Forester would be a better choice (that one is already big and tall in early June). But, if it doesn't matter if it remains small until late July or early August, I really love little bluestem. I don't think one year of too much rain will matter, but it might be floppy this year. But, if it always gets too much water (every year), it will continually flop and I think not be a great choice.

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PRO
CHW Landscape/Design, llc

Yes, being a warm season grass, Little Bluestem is one of the last to come up, doesn't like much moisture, and will flop or 'lodge' if it doesn't get close to full sun. Most of them in my area (Minneapolis) are hardly up at all yet. Karl Forester and molinias, being cool season grasses will come up earlier and tolerate more moisture and shade.

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D C

Thanks Ann and CHW. I did just plant some Karl Foerster grasses but since they were in 4 inch pots I won't know right away how they will do. As for the Little Bluestems it sounds like I may just have to wait a bit longer to see what they may do. Height in this particular bed does matter somewhat as there are Rudbeckias planted in front of them that are already much taller than the grasses even though they were not supposed to be; maybe a better choice there would be Panicum Heavy Metal.

If the Bluestems do nothing by July then I will need to move them although I do not know where. Unfortunately my neighbors ridiculous use of large trees too close to their house cuts off more and more of my sun every year.

:(

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