Comments (19)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Holm Design & Consulting LLC
Richard - thank you for bringing this to my attention and thanks sfskies for your thoughful response. The BONAP map shows individual counties where this plant is adventive in NY but also seems to indicate it is native to the state. I'm sure the NY specific plant atlas is more accurate. I was not aware of its aggressive tendencies in CT (or NY). As with any plant, it is best to plant it only in its native range and I'm afraid the range has been perhaps been overstated by the national plant maps.
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Richard Futyma
I suppose that this conversation has strayed from the original topic, but I believe that it is important that gardeners become mindful about the potential consequences of the escape of some of the plants they are cultivating. Many are aware of species like purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) that have invaded wetlands. Fewer may have seen forests with an understory taken over by Japanese barberry, or old fields that have become a thicket of multiflora rose. In my professional life, I have witnessed such places all too often, and they are discouraging to see. I encourage gardeners to learn about invasive species. Even if their own state or province does not have an invasive species law, they can learn about them by checking sites like invasive.org or bugwood.org, or simply by doing a search on the words "invasive plant species" plus the name of their state or province.
3 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Holm Design & Consulting LLC
Richard - I completely agree. We have our own host of invasive plants in the upper MIdwest including buckthorn and garlic mustard. As someone who only landscapes with native plants I spend a lot of time repairing landscapes overrun with invasive plants. My Houzz articles are for an upper Midwest and western Great Lakes audience but I realize the articles are served up to all Houzz users. I will make an effort in the future to stress any concerns about a featured native plant in a given state. Again, thanks for bringing this to my attention!
1 Like    

Related Stories

Flowers and Plants Garden-Friendly Native Alternatives to Overplanted Exotics
There are lots of gorgeous, wildlife-friendly native plants ready to make an appearance in your garden
Full Story
Most Popular 8 Native Shrubs for Year-Round Bird Feeding
It’s not just about berries. These plants provide insects for birds and seasonal interest for gardeners
Full Story
Flowers and Plants Great Design Plant: Staphylea Trifolia Shines in the Shade
Plant American bladdernut for 3 seasons of interest: spring flowers and striped brown branches and bladder-like seedpods in fall and winter
Full Story
Texas Native Plants Great Design Plant: Lobelia Siphilitica Keeps Its Cool
Great blue lobelia, a flowering native that prefers moist soil, adds a calming blue hue to the late-summer garden
Full Story
Native Plants What’s in a Name? See 6 Wildflowers That Aren’t ‘Weeds’ at All
Dispel the stereotypes of weeds and try these wildlife-supporting native wildflowers in your garden
Full Story
Bulbs 6 Splendid Blue-Flowering Bulbs
How do you blue? With colors from sky to cobalt, these bulbs will greet you merrily in a spring garden
Full Story
Most Popular 15 Native Flowers That Feed Native Bees
These perennials offer superfood to hundreds of bees and are gorgeous in their own right
Full Story
Flowers and Plants Great Design Plant: Symphyotrichum Novae-Angliae Ushers in Fall
With bold purple flowers easily accessible to pollinators, New England aster offers loads of interest in the autumn garden
Full Story
Flowers and Plants Great Design Plant: Little Bluestem Goes Above and Beyond
It thrives in poor soil and provides food and shelter for wildlife. Plus, Schizachyrium scoparium is just a darn pretty native grass
Full Story