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annnw3

I woke up this morning, glanced out the window and literally gasped! The 4 Texas Ranger Sage I planted 2 years ago have suddenly bloomed and, man, I mean BLOOMED. My yard is a riot of the most gorgeous purple, complemented beautifully with yellow and orange lantana shrubs weaving around them. The reason I'm so excited is that this is their first bloom and I had given up on them. I'm in southern Arizona and we got some rain the last few days so I guess that's it.

However, there's a problem. I went out to take pictures and realized that each shrub is covered in hundreds if not thousands of bees! I jumped back quickly and returned inside. Even as I type this, I can hear bees knocking into my windows. It's a bit disconcerting. I know bees are good for a garden....but that many? And where are they coming from? There are usually a few dozen bees around my rosemary plants in the early morning but this is something else. I'm worried they'll build a hive somewhere on the house.

Advice from anyone experienced with this would be appreciated. I guess I'll wait until the shrubs stop flowering and then walk around to see if a hive has been formed somewhere on the property. Meanwhile I'll just watch these beautiful shrubs from inside the house. I hope I'm just being needlessly paranoid and everyone has a thousand bees on their Texas Ranger Sage, lol.

   
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ruthieq

I don't have Tx. sage but I do have Ca. Manzanita shrub and it gets thousands of bees every spring. So I can understand what you are seeing around you're shrubs. We have never been stung by these bees as they are too busy gathering to bother with us.

   
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annnw3

Thank you for responding ruthieq. If you get thousands of bees on your Manzanita every spring, I'll take it as a sign that what's happening to my plants is normal. The sky has darkened and it looks like a storm is coming. I notice the bees have thinned out considerably and they stopped flying into my window panes hours ago. I will still walk around to be sure they have not built a hive on the house, but otherwise I guess everything is okay.

   

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