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lucy22b

This is fine for people who like this kind of space and does at least include trees and some borders for planting but it's too sparse and hard for me especially, I imagine, in the winter As a Londoner with a similarly tiny space I favour the opposite approach - a 'proper' garden, albeit on a very modest scale. Here are my reasons:

1. The more urban your setting the more the spirit needs greenness. The sound of birdsong outside your window when you wake, a leafy prospect as you sip your morning tea, a green retreat in which to unwind and potter after a day in the city are immeasurably valuable.

2. Privacy. As you can see in the photographs this house is overlooked by similar properties. Mine is too, so with a minimalist garden it would feel as if we were facing a cliff of other people's house walls and windows. Judicious and generous planting creates a more effective screen than bare walls or fences. It can't entirely block out the urban view but it helps, and it creates a more effective buffer zone between you and the neighbours than fences.

3. Being a good neighbour. My heart sinks at the idea of planning your tiny city garden to contain the maximum number of guests. Of course the occasional party is fine but frequent occasions when the neighbours have to retreat from your noise are just plain antisocial. My own view - though I increasingly feel this is considered eccentric - is that close-packed urban living only works well if one is constantly considerate of one's neighbours.

4. Maintenance. To anyone tempted to go the architectural route on the grounds of ease of maintenance I'd only add that in my experience well-planned borders (shrubs, trees, herbaceous perennials) largely look after themselves once established. Relying on containers, as many who opt for wall-to-wall paving do, can actually involve more work and attention if you want to keep them looking good.

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PRO
Stefano Marinaz Landscape Architecture

The video of Winter & Spring at Redcliffe is now online

For more video visit www.stefanomarinaz.com/videos

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PRO
Stefano Marinaz Landscape Architecture
Hi Gail M, we supplied those pots and chairs. Email us directly studio@stefanomarinaz.com and we will be happy to help you sourcing chairs and pots.

Kind regards
Stefano Marinaz
   

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