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PRO
Kipnis Architecture + Planning

Holly, I would strongly recommend that you get a qualified energy home rater to review the entire house and building envelope. It can be tricky to pinpoint what the problem is until you have the house analyzed by a professional. I would think this would be about $250 - $350 to do, and it sounds like they might find some other items to. They can look at the walls of the house using an infrared camera and see where the thermal issues are.

To answer your question, yes, it is possible that a sliding patio door could be the issue by itself. It might not be installed correctly, the compression seals around could be bad, the glass seals may have failed, etc. The energy rater should be able to help with all of that.

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holly_smith75

Thank you so much for your response.

   
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PRO
Mecone Inc.

Many older houses that were built in 1970's and earlier don't have any insulation in walls and barely have any insulation in attics. Walls and raised floors are typically not insulated at all. Back then only roofs were insulated and i should say barely insulated (R-11 or R-13). Today, we have strict building energy code known as Title 24 part 6. It originated in 1978. The code covers building insulation, energy efficiency of HVAC and water heating systems, windows and skylights requirements and more. Any new construction, addition & alteration project must include Title 24 Report which is the output of an energy calculation typically performed by Mechanical Engineers.

Another item to note is the air infiltration. It is an uncontrolled air leakage, when outside air enters and conditioned air leaves your house (building) through cracks and openings. It is worse during cold and windy weather. Infiltration also contributes to moisture problems that may affect structural integrity and occupants health.

Reducing infiltration (the amount of air that leaks in and out) of your home is a very cost effective way to reduce energy cost associated with cooling and heating, increase occupant comfort and create healthy environment.

by Mecone inc.

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