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gatoryak

Law abiding citizens care about the R-value. When people waste resources, the resources become expensive for all of us. Social darwinists don't seem to care that food and energy will become so expensive that only the super-wealthy will be able to afford to live comfortably. The result will be even more draconian rules and constant rebellion. Maybe not in your lifetime, but do you care about the next generation - your children?

It is possible to make perfectly beautiful buildings while complying with the energy codes. Houzz should be glorifying those kind of houses, rather than houses whose designers flaunt their disregard for building codes and the comfort of the buildings' occupants.

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judygilpin

I'm all for re-cycling, being green and helping the environment. We have solar, re-cycle, and have a hybrid auto) , but I'm against being told how to live my life. That is called "Government Control" (i.e. Socialism) . A thing our Fore fathers fought against. My thought is that we all need to be good citizens, BUT don't tell me I'm wrong if you disagree with me. Don't tell anyone the most important thing is to select the proper R factor, as you see it. I think this leads to a great harm to our children and grandchildren. They will then become followers....NOT leaders. Let\s just get on to home decorating. You made your point about "greenness". Next !!!

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no_comment

@judygilpin: your "who cares about the r-value" statement is ridiculous, and i'll leave it at that.

@gatoryak: i don't think it's far to allege that the designer did this remodel with "disregard for building codes", because they clearly had to get a building permit to do this renovation and there is absolutely nothing in the photos to suggest that the renovation was done in violation of building codes. while i am inclined to agree that the owners probably gave up a bit of thermal performance in the renovation, when i looked at the "before" picture, i'm not convinced that the renovation is *that* much worse in terms of thermal performance.

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