Comments (18)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
smittycdm
@Tali Ben-Gal Benjamin I have had this problem when I sprinkled Ironite (acid amendment for plants) too vigorously & a few grains landed on my beautiful bluestone pavers. I initially used the very expensive stone floor cleaner, but found that very fine (000) steel wool worked better. I also tried extra fine sand paper, that works well too.
@buygrills I hear ya! I live at the beach in "The OC" & although my front patio, where everyone walks by, looks sooo beautiful & matches my shingled house (designed by me, thx). It's so hot,
I can't walk on it! Then I read it's best used as pool coping in CO! Who knew?
1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Nandina Home & Design

Thanks for the share!

   
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
tkaphingst
Some of the information in this article is incorrect. The term "flagstone" refers to the thickness/layer that the stone came from in the quarry. Flagstone is generally found only in the top layers of the quarry. As the quarry is blasted further down the layers get thicker and become step layers which is generally 6 to 8 inches, then outcropping or wall stone layers which can be 8 to 25 inches in thickness. True Bluestone is called Blue-Blue and everything else is called Mixed Color that can range from blue-green to blue-gray with many colors mixed into the base color. Flagstone is either considered "irregular" shaped (triangles, squares, rectangles of different sizes) or cut into squares and rectangles-commonly known as Pattern A (even numbered sizes) or Pattern B (odd numbered sizes) or also called an Ashlar Pattern. Bluestone is not a sandstone. It is considered to be a form of Limestone that has a somewhat consistent surface with natural clef or shaling occurring in the layers. Thermal treated stone has been cut into an exact thickness of 1-1/2" then heat treated to give it a non-skid texture and the true color. Cut stone, if left with a sawed surface is extremely slippery when wet. There are many types of Flagstone on the market and the type or name usually comes from where it is being quarried. I work at a quarry in Lannon WI so ours is known as Lannon Stone, but we buy stone from Chilton WI known as Chilton Flagstone-a very colorful type of limestone and so on. Hope this helps clear up any confusion on the correct terminology to use when talking to a Landscaping Professional. And to the guy who mortered his flagstone on top of cement; Cement under flagstone is never a good idea unless you have at least 5" to 6" of a crushed limestone base between them. If you are in a cold environment, a flagstone patio needs to be able to move and shift with any freezing or thawing that happens over the winter. I would find a professional Hardscaper in your area to help you with your issues.
4 Likes    

Related Stories

Stone Landscape Paving 101: Slate Adds Color to the Garden
Slate’s distinct hues set it apart from other natural stone paving
Full Story
Most Popular How to Design Garden Paths That Bring a Landscape to Life
We guide you through material and placement choices that will take your pathways from ordinary to extraordinary
Full Story
Paths Landscape Paving 101: How to Use Limestone for Your Patio
Limestone stands the test of time and works in both contemporary and classic landscape designs
Full Story
Brick Landscape Paving 101: How to Use Brick for Your Path or Patio
Brick paving is classy, timeless and a natural building material. Here are some pros and cons to help you decide if it’s right for your yard
Full Story
Shop Houzz Outdoor Games and Pool Essentials
By Houzz
Playful picks for entertaining and relaxing outside
See Products
Paths Landscape Paving 101: Some Reasons to Go for Granite
Thinking about a new patio or path? Invest in granite for its durability and low maintenance
Full Story
Pools Secrets of a Successful Water Garden
Relax. Having a water garden is much easier once you understand the basics
Full Story
Concrete Precast Concrete Pavers Make a Versatile Surface in the Garden
You can use concrete pavers in a variety of shapes and colors for your patio, walkway, driveway and more
Full Story
Shop Houzz Highest-Rated White and Gray Vanities
By Houzz
Freshen up your bath with a neutral finish
See Products