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Bill Fry Construction - Wm. H. Fry Const. Co.

Here's a photo while were doing an air-sealing test to achieve at most .6 air changes per hour. Normally this is done at an exterior door, however we hadn't installed the door yet, so we made our own opening. Note that because the door blower door test equipment sits inside a door opening, the leakiness of that door assembly is not tested. A workaround is to put the equipment in a different exterior door opening on a subsequent test. This home is a new custom home in Los Altos, California, USA.

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River Architects

Nice work Bill! In our own certified passive design studio we had an air tightness result of .18 ACH50, for a retrofit. Builders are getting better and better at hitting tight numbers, and the work is becoming demystified. Our latest project just hit .2 ACH50 in the preliminary test, so our studio wasn't just a fluke!

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Bill Fry Construction - Wm. H. Fry Const. Co.

Awesome! We don't have our final numbers yet, but we expect to hit at least the required .6. Realistically, in the San Francisco Bay Area, you can live in a tent - so the numbers aren't as critical as more challenging climates. The homeowner will still have the benefit of having a home that is 10x more energy-efficient than the neighbors and enjoy superior indoor air quality. We've had several challenges that are inherent to the design - so far, we're trying to avoid motorized duct dampers and we have three major holes that are designed in: the hood, the dryer, and a bathroom fan. The dryer cannot be a ventless heatpump-type because there is a desire to get clothing crispy dry and for the dryer to be within the envelope. With all of the insulation, the house is super quiet and sounds much sturdier than a conventional home.

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