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hsmeghan

I truly don't want to offend anyone and apologize if I do so, but I just have to comment on the suggestion of adding a "vintage chair with flaking paint" as a design element. I would really like to know where this trend of using weathered, beat-up, "distressed" furniture or decorating pieces came from and how in the world it became so popular! I think such pieces are truly ugly and just look dirty, not to mention that flaking paint can be dangerous to children who might eat the flakes -- lead paint can taste sweet.

I go into a store like Hobby Lobby and it seems like this is ALL they have, and after looking awhile I just walk back out. It's too bad because some of the furniture designs they have are nice and I would really like them if they didn't look like they just came out of long-term storage in someone's garage or back yard shed.

One would never put a couch that has ripped up, moldy upholstery into a living room and call it a "vintage piece" -- it's ugly and unsafe, and you'd want to refinish and reupholster such a piece both to improve its aesthetic qualities and to make it safe and comfortable before using it. In the same way, why would you use a wooden chair or dresser or table that is beat up and has flaking paint without refinishing it? I get the idea of "rustic" and I know that older furniture can be sturdy and nicely styled, but this particular trend in decorating is just a complete mystery to me. I honestly can't understand why you would want a chair or any other piece of furniture in your home that looks beat-up and dirty and has flaking paint. If you are going to use a vintage wooden chair, strip off the flaking paint and repaint it a lovely color that you like, or refinish the wood to its original glory!

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voegelsnest

I live in a pine floored and walled, hardy plank cottage in a forest (literally) in Victoria, Australia. Polished pine is warm and reassuring but can be echoey if only with minimalist furniture. I fell in love with Baltic Pine furniture which really complements this environment with its smooth, polished, rounded off look. Like another reviewer, I am not a fan of "vintage" look furniture. I don't need to try to be rustic because I'm surrounded by it. I hang tapestries, cross stitch pictures (made by myself) and textile wall hangings. My favourite is a Turkish wall hanging in the hall with grandmother clock, a wooden dressing table (yes, really!) with a subdued lamp and pottery vase. I also have red cedar horizontal window blinds and soft flowing lace curtains as well. Hanging green plants look great with them, too. My advice: just trust your taste and go with it.

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writerinfact
I'm with hsmeghan about "distressed" furniture, especially artificially distressed furniture. Give that poor old chair some love; strip it, sand it, and stain it, or paint it if you must. I have a linen cabinet from my great-grandmother's house. The corners are worn, and the stain is somewhat uneven at the edges. But it is over 100 years old! It has seen its share of use, moving, and wear. Worn is not the same thing as sanded off for effect - and one can tell the difference! Just to be contrary (because I frequently am), I don't see how a single "rustic accent" - or even a few - is going to make modern and contemporary look like "home." I like the wide planks that are a less than perfect match, in any space. I think that, personally, I just want a lot more intrinsically Rustic and a whole lot less modern, contemporary, or white. Except, maybe, regarding plumbing and Internet connections! Great-grandma's house, after all, had an outhouse.
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