Comments (27)
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
HalloBlondie-zone5a
I would love to see an aerial or a panoramic view of this garden. I guess with the overall size of the space it was not possible. But I cannot envision the total effect of the space. Love the look of all the lush foliage & trees. Wishing I had more space to experiment with larger plants & blocking groups. When you only have a suburban lot you have to have a lot more restraint in your planning so it does not become an overgrown mess :(
2 Likes    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Sonny 62

This garden strikes such a chord of peacefulness when I look
at it. I’d have to think that after a
very hectic and stressful day the owners return home, sit down and sigh with
relief. I don’t know where I read
recently but it strikes me that we could draw from James’ design
elements of Japanese gardening most specifically keeping things in scale. So I’m going to second Skagitnana’s
suggestion that you do an article on garden design with a focus on the correlation
between a home’s height and shape.
Proportion is sometimes so difficult to achieve. Meanwhile, thank you for the links to John
Brookes and references from whom James found his inspiration. You have to enjoy an individual (Wolfgang Oehme) who
liked to celebrate birthdays with a weeding party :-)

1 Like    
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Jay Sifford Garden Design

Halloblondie, you bring up an interesting point. Matrix planting, or block planting, can be extremely successful in smaller spaces. In reality, I could not do it for myself because I'm too much of a collector. However, the artist part of me could do it in a heartbeat. For years, I've envisioned building an H-shaped home with a front courtyard covered in either gravel or DG. On one side of the courtyard I'd do a row of very sculptural trees, probably laid out in a Japanese yatsuhashi (zigzag) pattern. Across from it, I'd do one big bed of panicum grass. I might put a large sculpture in the center of it to counterbalance the trees, or maybe not. But my point is this: if you have restraint, you can do an awesome matrix planting in a smaller space. If you love specimen conifers and Japanese maples like I do, um, well, probably not!

2 Likes    

Related Stories

Problem Solving With the Pros: An Abundant Garden Stretches Its Means
Swaths of resilient, eye-catching plants thrive with little care or resources in the landscape of a Pennsylvania farmhouse
Full Story
Pools Secrets of a Successful Water Garden
Relax. Having a water garden is much easier once you understand the basics
Full Story
How to Design a Beautiful Shade Garden
Turn the cool, shady spot in your garden into your own quiet oasis
Full Story
Most Popular 5 Ways to Keep Your Native Plant Garden Looking Good All Year
It’s all about planning ahead, using sustainable practices and accepting plants as living organisms
Full Story
Shop Houzz Up to 75% Off Al Fresco Dining Sale
By Houzz
Save on stylish tables and chairs for a patio fit for outdoor entertaining
See Products
Find Yourself in an Epic Garden in the Shade
Feeling hot and tired gardening in the sun? The world of shade gardening beckons you to its cool mystery
Full Story
Gardening Guides Garden Design for Wildlife and Less Work
Looking to nature for inspiration can invigorate our suburban landscapes
Full Story
Most Popular 7 Ways to Use Drifts and Masses In Your Garden
Whether in formal or natural landscapes, grasses or succulents planted en masse elevate the garden
Full Story
Shop Houzz Outdoor Favorites by Category
By Houzz
Popular seating, shade, decor and other essentials for a summer-ready patio
See Products
Area Rugs Highest-Rated Neutral-Colored Rugs
By Houzz
Find a tranquil rug to accent your easy-going style
See Products