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pippabean

jmg - not necessarily. Sure, solid wood is superior to engineered, for one, it can be sanded and refinished repeatedly. But the top quality factory finish of engineered wood can not be replicated by on site finishing. I have solid oak flooring in most of my house, and engineered flooring in the family room. There is no comparison, dogs, kids, nothing scratches or dulls this finish. It's just like with paint finishes. Factory finish beats on site finishing every time.

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dci8675309

Hello,


Not sure if anyone can help but I sure would appreciate any and all assistance!


I live in a 3 bed, 3 bath, single story ranch home (with basement) that has 2-1/2" x 11-7/8" x 30' I-Joist's (APA Product Report #PR-L252). The spacing between floor joists is 17 1/4". The sub-floor on top of I-Joists is 3/4" OSB.


I would like to install 3/4" red oak hardwood throughout the home and in the bathrooms 12" x 12" or possibly 12" x 16" x 1/4" or 3/8" thick ceramic or porcelain tile. There is a ever so slight "soft" feel (I believe) to the OSB.


I was prepared to not give this any thought as some "tradesman" say screw and GLUE 1/2" cement board and you will be fine : - ((!?


Doing some digging I'm seeing words like "defection" for the first time. YES I'M CLUELESS : - (. This is a paragraph I saw online that got me looking into my existing floor joist which as far as I can tell have a defection rating of L/252... "If you’re working with large-format tile or natural stone, specify that your rooms meet a stronger deflection rating: L/720, instead of the base-standard L/360.


>>>>>>>> In your opinion can this floor handle tile? <<<<<<<<<


If it can handle tile should I be considering installing 1/2" plywood atop the 3/4" OSB, then cement board or something like Ditra?


Again... any and all assistance is greatly appreciated!


Dan

   
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Tina D

Any ideas of how to make a large/high threshold transition appear less sloped to reduce the look of a 2 inch difference in height? (joists do not allow for lowering higher tiled floor) - Most of main level is lower. Thanks!


   

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