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floridaisland

@auntiebuzzybee This may be too late, but wanted to say that my first house (Tampa, Florida) was a 50's one, too and also had those jalousie windows. I can't count the number of times I've wished I could have them again! The breeze I had was so great that I barely ever ran A/C. In the winter, I popped out the screens and put in the (not attractive) vinyl inserts for the couple of winter months - and it seemed to be enough to keep the house warm with little heat usage. So it turned out that, back then, they really were energy efficient for the climate we had. And absolutely no stale or polluted inside air!

So they may not survive a hurricane and they may not be typically "energy efficient" or up-to-date ... but my electric bill was very low. I loved the almost constant air exchange, too. This was the late 70's, so it may not apply now. So many people have moved here since that the state has been paved and it's a lot hotter than it used to be. But if you still get the breezes, I'd think long and hard about replacing them. You wouldn't be allowed to ever go back.

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rbattlesfoy

This advice might be appropriate for new houses, but for old homes, replacing windows is both unnecessary and robs your home of its original character. Old wood windows can be weatherstripped for improved thermal performance. A professional wood window restorer can install these simple items. With a good storm window, your originals will yield the same energy efficiency as new ones. Restoring old windows will be less expensive than cheap vinyl replacements, about the same cost as a middle-of-the road replacement, and much less expensive than custom made ones. There's nothing "green" about throwing out perfectly good sash into landfill. Repairing and retaining (anything old) is the ultimate in environmental responsibility. All things being equal, why would you sacrifice aesthetics and architectural integrity? BTW, I am not "selling" anything, I'm just a regular homeowner who has done her homework.

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Dana C.

You can also have windows repaired- not necessary to replace. Even fogged, leaky windows.

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