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jsetla

Tucked into this article is the key...it's attractive if you associate nice things with it, like Kate above, and her grandparents' cottage. For someone like me who had a turbulent childhood in a home with such furniture, there is zero attraction. On the other hand, my designer-best-friend questioned my choice of knotty pine floors in our new cottage, over a nicer wood. I had realized that whenever I was in a place with knotty pine as a child, (away from home) I was happier. More power to those of you who want those cast-offs.

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Julia Mack Design, LLC

I am a fan of Mid-Century Modern and Scandinavian design from the 50's and 60's and find that the addition of one or two pieces to a room adds a layered depth of style that is both unique and interesting. A Paul McCobb nightstand with brass details and travertine top rounds out a bedroom decor in a way that everyday retail designs do not. Two low wood teak chairs in a living room or a 1960's modern mahogany and teak dining table are a stylish way to set your space apart from standard retail selections. A few of these pieces added to an interior design concept pairs nicely with contemporary selections and cannot be beat for quality and sophisticated design.

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DenverGuy

Fantastic article but I think there is more to it. Midcentury modern is highly versatile and mixes well with contemporary, modern, even industrial and feng shui. It is often geometric, simple and very friendly to color pops or naturals. I think it is a style that will stand the test of time and always generate interest even more than say art deco. The openness and versatility of the style is unlimited. I could see it in a space station or futuristic society on another planet, lol. In any case it seems to have taken off these days with modern furniture choices and décor. There is a whole neighborhood of these homes not far from me and they go fast when they come up. Most need a good restoration or modernization but the bones are there to bring them right up to current design trends with minimal reconstruction.

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