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Contractor's 100

Photo: Janet Paik © 2013 Houzz
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What Houzz contributors are saying:

Vanessa Brunner added this to Contractor Tips: 10 Remodel Surprises to Watch Out For
5. Water damage. What looks like just a brown spot on the ceiling might turn out to be rotted rafters and a moldy roof and wall sheathing. Suddenly, what you thought was a ceiling repair job turns into an environmental hazard (mold, like asbestos, should be remediated by a contractor trained in this work) that requires new sheathing, a new roof and maybe new siding.6. Termites. Where there is water, especially when it's close to the ground, termites are soon to follow. If you live in an area with termites, the water that infiltrates your walls brings termites into the walls and floor joists. Correcting this problem in a finished space can mean completely remodeling that part of the house. The termite inspection that was done when you bought your house should not be the last. Catching a problem early can mean the difference between hundreds and tens of thousands of dollars.
Erin Carlyle added this to How Long Is Your Contractor on the Hook?
The One-Year WarrantyThe key thing to understand about warranties is that many builders offer their own warranty in lieu of the implied warranty. Additionally, many contracts specify that homeowners are giving up their rights to the implied warranty by agreeing to the builder’s express warranty. Also, builders will “often try to shorten statutes of limitation and statutes of repose. Some states allow you to do that. Others don’t,” says Anthony Lehman, an Atlanta attorney who advises homeowners.Though there is no industrywide standard, many residential contractors have adopted a one-year warranty for their contracts. The practice likely trickled down from commercial construction, where a callback warranty is typical. A callback warranty means that within one year, a building owner has the right to call back the contractor and expect him or her to repair work, Lehman says. The downside for homeowners who agree to a one-year warranty is that they likely trade away their right to the implied warranty, and they may also agree to limit the time they have to discover a defect and sue. Obviously, this is a plus for builders because it limits their risk.But there is no real reason a homeowner has to accept a one-year warranty simply because that’s the builder’s first offer. “It’s a negotiated point, and people can negotiate warranties that are broader — and they often do,” says Robert C. Procter, outside general counsel for the Wisconsin Builders Association. “If you don’t ask for more, you won’t get more.”

What Houzzers are commenting on:

dyhaigler added this to Planning Construction
5. Water damage. What looks like just a brown spot on the ceiling might turn out to be rotted rafters and a moldy roof and wall sheathing. Suddenly, what you thought was a ceiling repair job turns into an environmental hazard (mold, like asbestos, should be remediated by a contractor trained in this work) that requires new sheathing, a new roof and maybe new siding. 6. Termites. Where there is water, especially when it's close to the ground, termites are soon to follow. If you live in an area with termites, the water that infiltrates your walls brings termites into the walls and floor joists. Correcting this problem in a finished space can mean completely remodeling that part of the house. The termite inspection that was done when you bought your house should not be the last. Catching a problem early can mean the difference between hundreds and tens of thousands of dollars.