Dry Garden, Palos Verdes contemporary-landscape
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Dry Garden, Palos Verdes

Bliss Garden Design
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http://www.blissgardendesign.com
Inspiration for a contemporary full sun backyard landscaping in Los Angeles. — Houzz

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Lisa wrote:
What is the name of the blue/grey grass? - What is the name of the blue/grey grass?
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Lisa
Thank you Tish... Your garden designs are absolutely inspirational! Brilliant use of contrasting textures and colours... Stunning!!
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Bliss Garden Design
Thanks Lisa!
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gratzee wrote:
California is running out of water and we will have to lose our lawns, - California is running out of water and we will have to lose our lawns, flowers, etc. What types of plants can you suggest for DRY gardens, and lawn areas? Thank you!
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Bliss Garden Design

Hi Gratzee - Yes, I know all too well and its heartbreaking to see a state I love very much in this predicament. I was just in Los Angeles and it is so brown for this early in the year. Your zone & location will dictate what plants are appropriate, but there are many choices that will be tougher as the hoses & irrigation have to be dialed down. The garden shown above is maritime Southern CA so more forgiving in terms of temperature than many locations in CA. In this location, we have found the succulents (except aeonium) and natives to be the least demanding in terms of water as well as a few key ornamental grasses such as Sesleria autumnalis. The challenge I think that is facing home gardeners is how to establish a new site appropriate garden replacing lawns and thirty plants without having to double up on the water usage initially. It always take more water to establish plants initially - even drought tolerant ones. Retaining key established large trees or shrubs many be the right approach since many of these require less water already and also doing the work in the cooler season where there may be some rainfall. Evaluating your automatic irrigation systems is also important - sprinklers are notorious for wasting water. I'd suggest working with the talented designers and the nurseries in your area to determine the right plants & approach for your site. I will say though after converting a classic "English" garden in Los Angeles to the less thirty and more site appropriate garden shown above, the results are breathtaking. The garden feels more at home in the surroundings and the wildlife loves it!

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J wrote:
What is the blue flowering plant in the background? - .
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For once, I am stumped. That is a plant that was already in the garden (I did not add it) and its too blurry for me to see what it is....

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edc97001 wrote:
Ground cover? - What's next to the blue grass? Thanks
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Hi edc97001 - In front is a succulent groundcover, fairly certain it is a crassula, but not positive which one. Behind this is Helianthemum 'Cheviot'. Thymus pseudolanuginosus at the very front.

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gabel0522 wrote:
What is a hanging bed - Hangs from wall
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Hi there - not sure what the question is, could you clarify? Thanks
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Cornelia wrote:
what species of achillea is that?
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Hi - that is Achillea millefolium 'Terracotta'. Supposed to be peachy but always seems to be more yellow...
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What Houzz contributors are saying:

Jocelyn H. Chilvers added this to Texture Talk: 4 Foliage Types for Distinctive Gardens
Texture impacts both small and large plantings, and can be applied to any design style or habitat. Leaf texture is a function of leaf shape and/or size, and creates a unique visual statement.
Falon Land Studio LLC added this to Learn Your Garden’s Microclimates for a Resilient Landscape
Your Overall ClimateYou first need to understand the overall climate where you live. Use this checklist as a starting point.What is your growing zone? In the U.S., many people use the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) hardiness zone map to determine your area’s minimum winter temperatures. Your zone’s minimum temperature will let you know if a plant can survive winter where you live, because plants are rated by growing zone based on their cold hardiness. This is most important for cold climates.What is the length of your growing season? Determine how many days above freezing you typically have. For warm and temperate climates, you need to know how intense your heat can be. Some plants just can’t handle a southern climate’s sun and will die in response. Just as the USDA’s Plant Hardiness Zone Map charts a region’s minimum temperatures, the American Horticultural Society’s (AHS’) Plant Heat Zone Map charts the country’s high temperatures.How much precipitation do you get annually, and when does it occur? Do you have wet and dry seasons? Does it rain throughout the year? Does it hardly rain at all? Know how many inches on average your area receives each year and during which months.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

fionna d added this to 900 Landscapes
Beside driveway? Left looking up from house
R. Nalbandian added this to webuser_75981980's ideas
A little too much but I like the height advancement

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