Chalk Hill Off-Grid Cabin rustic-exterior
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Chalk Hill Off-Grid Cabin

This 872 s.f. off-grid straw-bale project is a getaway home for a San Francisco couple with two active young boys.

© Eric Millette Photography
URL
http://www.arkintilt.com
Small mountain style beige split-level stucco exterior home photo in Sacramento with a shed roof — Houzz

This photo has 7 questions

sadams60 wrote:
I am assuming you sealed the barndoor for when it is closed? How did you do that?
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Real Carriage Door & Sliding Hardware

What a wonderful home! At Real Sliding Hardware we sell beautiful barn doors and
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billevy501

What would be the cost to built this home in my own lot


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Treybo wrote:
I love it! Can you give me an idea of the cost of this house?
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Arkin Tilt Architects
that's the underside of the roofing you are seeing - there is no additional soffit material
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letitwin
O.k. Wow! Can that work on any home?
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dmartenot wrote:
I love this house I would love to build it. - How do I get the plans for this house?
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rottibear

How did you frame the roof with the overhang on two sides?

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Arkin Tilt Architects

The fascia cantilevers and is stiffened by the perpendicular fascia (we work with a good structural engineer!)


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jankowskitomasz wrote:
What brand are these cement boards? - Can you share details? It looks really good.
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jankowskitomasz
Can you share details for the masonry stain? The masonry stain was for the fire safety reason or for color effect? Or maybe both?
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Arkin Tilt Architects
When stained while laid flat, the stain puddles in the grooves, accentuating the grain pattern. It was done for color and effect; many different stains should work.
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dream20home wrote:
What material is ground cover outside? (pea gravel?)
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dream20home
Thank you. I would like to convert/replace the carport into a main living space accommodating rec room for kids, kitchen (indoor/outdoor) for entertaining, and storage. When you see the pics, do any ideas come to mind for using this carport space to transform house into modern cabin/farmhouse look? My wife and I love the modern cabin/lodge spaces like chalk hill, and landscaping that is simple and encourages outdoor life for us.

Due to limited budget restraints, we're only looking at ideas on how carport can be transformed into living space for our active lives, and how it connects to current house. Also, entry for the house is on fairway side (other side of home) and rarely used. We'd love to find ideas on where best to locate entryway also. Thank you.
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Joshua
What was done to the fiber cement to make it look more natural?
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mzpiff wrote:
What does the system design for the solar power look like?
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Arkin Tilt Architects

The
primary heating system is a unique high-mass active solar space and domestic
water heating system. This relatively simple system utilizes a 5 4x8
solar hot water panels and a PV powered pump, elegantly circulating solar-heated
water only when the sun is shining.
Heated fluid is first circulated through a heat exchanger, transferring
heat to a domestic hot water storage tank, and is then routed through tubing
buried in three foot deep insulated beds of sand beneath the floor slabs, where
heat is stored and allowed to slowly radiate upward, heating the home’s
interior. An efficient wood-burning
stove compliments this heating. A description of the system can be found in Bob Ramlow's book, 'Solar Water Heating' (New Society Publishers / Mother Earth News).

Electricity needs are met
with a 2.4 kW photovoltaic array, tied to an inverter and bank of batteries
which store the power for lighting, refrigeration and other needs. There is a backup LP generator that can be used to recharge the batteries if ever necessary.


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gjConstructs House of Design wrote:
Area - How much area is on the second fl? Are there more interior and exterior photos?
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Arkin Tilt Architects
The sleeping loft above the kitchen of this cabin is roughly 10' x 14', but it's only 5 1/2 feet tall at it's highest. One can see more photos of the project via the links on our website: http://www.arkintilt.com/projects/residential/millette.html
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What Houzz contributors are saying:

Vanessa Brunner added this to Houzz Tour: California Cabin Ditches the Power Grid
Keeping the home small and under budget were the team's biggest priorities. Since it was designed to be a part-time residence, material selection was kept to a minimum. Construction was based around simple and durable materials, such as the home's metal roof and concrete floors. Salvaged wood siding was used for part of the exterior, while the panels between the windows and the exterior of the raised bathroom and entry area are made from cement fiberboard that's stained to look like wood.
Liz Durnan added this to 11 Reasons to Live in a House of Straw
“Then there is the rendering, which tends to be earth or lime, as a breathable render is better for straw so moisture can be released. Also, wide eaves are recommended to protect the wall from weathering,” says Brennan. “There is also the attention to detail around windows and at the top and bottom of walls, which needs to be worked through before you start, so every step of the construction is working towards the finish result you are after.”Would you consider building a house of straw? Or are you still afraid a big, bad wolf might blow it down? Let us know in the Comments.More: Why You Might Want to Build a House of Straw

What Houzzers are commenting on:

Herb Sylvester added this to Herb's ideas
Nice lines, needs more glass on back

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