American FarmhouseFarmhouse Entry, DC Metro

Example of a farmhouse slate floor entryway design in DC Metro with white walls and a glass front door —  Houzz
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This photo has 13 questions
Sarita wrote:Mar 30, 2014
  • Cat Hudgins
    This is actually a work bench that a carpenter used. The vices are for wood. We use ours to serve meals buffet style. This is a much more creative repurposing!
  • PRO
    Donald Lococo Architects
    Hey Cat
    I purchased it from a gentlemen who had two. Their particular use was in a leather shop. He informed me that I could buy some of the leather that was still piled on the two benches! Although, I have to agree, the vices do indeed lean towards use other than leather. Perhaps they were repurposed back then too.
Selina Allcorn wrote:Jan 7, 2015
  • Jimmy Symington

    Could you please provide the height dimension of the doors? confirmed 5' width?
    Thanks!


  • Selina Allcorn
    we have completed that project, the doors were standard thanks again.
katelyna2013 wrote:Nov 18, 2014
  • PRO
    Donald Lococo Architects
    Hmmm, Thats a good question. There is no record but I always use the same process for variegated tile and stone:

    I select a color that is within the tile and in this case and most often it isn't the dominant color. This allows the grid and patten of the grout to pop a bit; which, as you can see, adds to the scale and texture. For this, I chose one of the darker beiges and ask the contractor to give two of the closest available. From there I usually make a choice at the site.
    Donald Lococo AIA
  • PRO
    Great Seal LLC
    Like the horizontal and vertical elements juxtaposed
diane allen wrote:Sep 29, 2014
  • PRO
    Donald Lococo Architects
    for your kind words! The Slate is named: Black Rust sold by Jud Tile in Vienna Virginia. We bought a 16" by 16" tile then cut it in half and laid it in a brick pattern.
    Donald
  • defender66

    Thanks for sharing information.

Nicole Haydt_Miller wrote:Jan 12, 2014
  • PRO
    Donald Lococo Architects
    It is a natural clefted slate. Thanks for the question!
    We bought a 16" X 16" tile and then had someone on site cut each in half. It was much more reasonable a price to do it that way rather than ordering that size and much more interesting than a square tile.
    Donald
apmora wrote:May 28, 2014
  • PRO
    Donald Lococo Architects
    Thanks for asking!

    The paint color is a Benjamin Moore White I-01.

    Donald Lococo, AIA
emmcelwain wrote:Mar 30, 2014
  • PRO
    Donald Lococo Architects
    Thanks for the question!
    We bought a 16" X 16" tile and then had someone on site cut each in half. It was much more reasonable a price to do it that way rather than ordering that size and much more interesting than a square tile.
    Donald
timboski wrote:Jan 5, 2014
  • PRO
    Donald Lococo Architects
    It is a natural clefted slate. Thanks for the question!
    We bought a 16" X 16" tile and then had someone on site cut each in half. It was much more reasonable a price to do it that way rather than ordering that size and much more interesting than a square tile.
    Donald
pauline eigo wrote:Feb 6, 2016
    jillybean330 wrote:Aug 25, 2015
      Barbara Stauter wrote:Jul 15, 2015

        What Houzz contributors are saying:

        laurendunec
        Lauren Dunec Design added this to What to Know About Adding an Outdoor SinkJun 19, 2018

        3. Select the location of your outdoor sink. Drainage and water-source location will likely dictate where you put an outdoor sink. Along the back or side of a home is a popular spot, as often this provides easy access to the kitchen and is also often where water pipes are found. Siting an outdoor sink under a roof overhang or shade structure, where there is protection from the sun and other outdoor elements, can make the sink area much more usable. In cold-winter climates, the best spot for your outdoor sink may be in a breezeway or tucked inside the garage.

        mitchell_parker
        Mitchell Parker added this to 15 Modern-Rustic Farmhouses Celebrate Simple PleasuresJun 30, 2016

        An old work bench outfitted with a sink makes a potting area in the back entry. One of many interior windows in the home lets the spaces share light while giving a sense that the rooms were added on over time. Floor tile: Jud Tile; sink: Farmhaus Quatro Alcove 36-inch Reversible Fireclay, Whitehaus; faucet: Presidio, Mirabelle See more of this farmhouse

        becky
        Becky Harris added this to Winter Gardening: Ideas for a Dream Potting RoomOct 27, 2014

        “The trick to the potting room is to make it feel both inside and outside simultaneously,” says architect Donald Lococo. “Don’t hesitate to fill the space with elements like mulch, peat and plants, which can be nicely balanced with picture frames, drapery and even books.”This farmhouse’s potting room serves as a lovely buffer between a kitchen and a garage. Lococo used board and batten siding and a rustic clefted slate floor to make it feel like it was a breezeway closed in at a much later date.The mix of slate flooring with more refined interior elements (the shiny faucet and sink) led Lococo on a journey to find the right potting bench. When he came across a rustic antique tanner’s bench complete with interesting wooden vises, he knew he had found a piece full of history. Its dings and scratches all told the story of past uses, and his modern-day gardening clients could add to these layers of its working history. Plus, it had ample room for incorporating a sink. Choose a tough, durable floor that can hide dirt. As you look at flooring options, imagine yourself sweeping potting soil out the door with a broom. This room has a naturally clefted slate floor. To save money, Lococo purchased 16-inch by 16-inch tiles and had them cut in half. He then had them laid in a staggered pattern that was fitting for a farmhouse.If you have a sink, incorporate a spray nozzle. It’s much easier than having to center the pot underneath the faucet. You can even stretch it out across the countertop to pots that aren’t in the sink.

        lolalina
        Laura Gaskill added this to Are Stone Floors Right for Your Home?Oct 8, 2014

        Cons of Stone FlooringStone is expensive. There is no getting around it — stone is pricey. Choosing stone that is quarried locally is one way to cut down on costs, as shipping significantly boosts the price, but even a locally quarried stone floor costs far more than other options, like wood. Flooring: cleft slate

        What Houzzers are commenting on:

        meyerhanna
        meyerhanna added this to board and batten walls, trimOct 3, 2019

        Kevin really likes this simpler board & batten for den

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