An Arlington ResidenceTraditional Landscape, DC Metro

The garden that we created unifies the property by knitting together five different garden areas into an elegant landscape surrounding the house. Different garden rooms, each with their own character and “mood”, offer places to sit or wander through to enjoy the property. The result is that in a small space you have several different garden experiences all while understanding the context of the larger garden plan.

This is an example of a mid-sized traditional backyard stone landscaping in DC Metro. —  Houzz
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This photo has 11 questions
amylina wrote:Apr 11, 2015
  • John
    Are the stones natural cleft or thermal? Which stone store in DC area did you buy from?
  • PRO
    Scott Brinitzer Design Associates

    The stone is natural cleft which is preferable for laying on stone dust like in this case. We purchase stone at contractor yards and got this material from Tri-State Stone in Bethesda. Any local vendor in our are will carry this type of bluestone. Good luck with your project!


ginahoefle wrote:Jan 17, 2016
  • motherofdog
    I didn't build it but, they most likely have a sand base. It is amazing how well rocks and pavers seat in over time.
  • PRO
    Scott Brinitzer Design Associates

    The base has to be well constructed by the mason. A layer of stone dust is tamped and leveled before the stones are laid. Stone selection and precision is critical for the patio to look so perfect and last so long. We only use experienced masons on our jobs and their craftsmanship is amazing.

mailforwhit wrote:Apr 23, 2015
  • PRO
    Scott Brinitzer Design Associates

    It is an evergreen Privet called Ligustrum japonicum. It only grows in our zone 7 because it is protected. Best to use this plant in warmer zones.
    Good luck!


  • mailforwhit

    Thank you for your quick response!

Elaine M. Johnson wrote:Apr 17, 2013
stacisr wrote:Feb 20, 2015
winstoncletus wrote:Jan 15, 2014
  • ckcrane
    Knoll, Inc.
    www.knoll.com
Carrie wrote:Aug 20, 2013
  • PRO
    Scott Brinitzer Design Associates
    It is Acuba Japonica 'Sulfur' (variegated plant) & the other plant is Loropetalum chinense 'Suzanne'. In zone 7B they have lived in these pots for years. Loropetalum is marginally hardy here, so if we have a very cold winter, I may experience some die back.

What Houzz contributors are saying:

laurendunec
Lauren Dunec Design added this to 9 Inspiring Gardens Gain Privacy and Screening With PlantsAug 6, 2019

6. Green-Walled Garden RoomA multitrunked crape myrtle tree and an inviting pair of chairs anchor one of multiple garden rooms in this backyard in Arlington, Virginia. Landscape architect Scott Brinitzer selected a variety of hedge plants to create the various garden rooms in the landscape. For this particular room, he used California privet to create a tall screening hedge for privacy and Hicks yew to act as a room divider.Plants include:‘Natchez’ crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia ‘Natchez’, zones 6 to 9)California privet (Ligustrum ovalifolium, zones 5 to 8)Hicks yew (Taxus x media ‘Hicksii’, zones 4 to 7)Water requirement: Moderate; low once establishedLight requirement: Full sun to partial shadeNote: Privet can be invasive in parts of the Midwest and western U.S.; check with your local nursery before planting. Privet stems and leaves can be toxic to pets if ingested.

laurendunec
Lauren Dunec Design added this to 9 Fresh Design Ideas From Wildlife-Friendly GardensMar 25, 2018

7. Enclose garden spaces with year-round foliage. Well-designed gardens make use of plenty of evergreen plants, as they add structure and year-round interest. They also surround areas of the garden with lush foliage, giving an inviting, cozy feeling to garden rooms and outdoor seating areas. Evergreen hedges and trees also benefit garden wildlife by providing small animals with shelter and quick places to hide.Hedgers and Edgers: The 10 Best Shrubs for Structure

falonland
Falon Land Studio LLC added this to Landscape Paving 101: How to Use Bluestone in Your GardenJul 6, 2015

Paving patterns: Rectangular slabs are set edge to edge. Ashlar is the pattern for combining multiple sizes of squares and rectangles into one layout, as shown here, and is the most common bluestone paving pattern. Running bond is another common layout for bluestone. With flagstone shapes, you can create more organic layouts.More: See more ways to use bluestone in the landscapeBrowse more patio ideas

jocelynchilvers
Jocelyn H. Chilvers added this to Design Your Landscape for Peace and QuietNov 11, 2013

Select plants with sound suppression in mind. Wide, dense plantings that include both deciduous and evergreen plants are the most effective for year-round noise abatement. Plants set in motion by the wind create their own sounds that are generally appealing — celebrated in music and literature — and that can help mask offensive noises.

becky
Becky Harris added this to Get It Done: Clean and Prep the PatioApr 11, 2013

Pay attention to sun and shade requirements and plan the pot placement accordingly.

becky
Becky Harris added this to Great Design Plant: Crape MyrtleSep 19, 2012

The peeling bark is a beautiful blend of medium and light browns; it tends to roll as it peels, which adds a unique texture to the garden.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

joellyn_loehr
Joellyn Loehr added this to Joellyn's ideas2 days ago

A multitrunked crape myrtle tree and an inviting pair of chairs anchor one of multiple garden rooms in this backyard in Arlington, Virginia. Landscape architect Scott Brinitzer selected a variety of hedge plants to create the various garden rooms in the landscape. For this particular room, he used California privet to create a tall screening hedge for privacy and Hicks yew to act as a room divider.

webuser_694796281
Linda Selvidge added this to My ideas2 days ago

Hedge in front of seating area to make it feel secluded, separate, but without a fence

carolynmcdermott
carolynmcdermott added this to Gardens2 days ago

A multitrunked crape myrtle tree and an inviting pair of chairs anchor one of multiple garden rooms in this backyard in Arlington, Virginia. Landscape architect Scott Brinitzer selected a variety of hedge plants to create the various garden rooms in the landscape. For this particular room, he used California privet to create a tall screening hedge for privacy and Hicks yew to act as a room divider. Plants include: ‘Natchez’ crape myrtle (Lagerstroemia ‘Natchez’, zones 6 to 9) California privet (Ligustrum ovalifolium, zones 5 to 8) Hicks yew (Taxus x media ‘Hicksii’, zones 4 to 7)

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