Bainbridge Island ResidenceEclectic Landscape, Seattle

A simple wooden boardwalk passes through the forest.
The stone sculpture is by Aaron G. Edwards

This is an example of an eclectic landscaping in Seattle. —  Houzz
Related Photo Topics
Related Professionals in Seattle
This photo has no questions

What Houzz contributors are saying:

mariannel
Marianne Lipanovich added this to Please Touch and More: 5 Elements of a Sensory GardenMay 17, 2017

Your plants don’t need to be the only elements that add color to your landscape. Colorful hardscape elements can do that as well, such as this red zigzag boardwalk.

brianbar
Brian Barth added this to Find Yourself in an Epic Garden in the ShadeJun 25, 2015

Contrast with color. For the most part, shade plants emphasize foliage more than flowers. The sea of green is soothing, but you can bring that quality into sharper focus with small doses of contrasting colors. That can occur seasonally, in the form of flowers or colorful foliage, but you can also knit the garden together year-round with a colorful hardscape element. Most shade gardens lack formality, leaving the path as the unifying theme visually. Carefully consider its movement through the space, and aim for a complementary contrast with the botanical elements, as with this red zigzag path. More: How to Design a Beautiful Shade GardenBrowse more landscape design ideas on Houzz

siffordgd
Jay Sifford Garden Design added this to Unify Your Garden With a Common ThreadOct 5, 2014

Repeat a common color. Instinctively, the human eye is first drawn to color. Use this instinct to your advantage by creating a thread of one color throughout your space. This composition of a red boardwalk and an art piece is a perfect example of how color can be used to best advantage. It gives the visitor a sense of comfort so that he or she is free to explore the myriad plant textures and shapes in this otherwise monochromatic woodland garden.

siffordgd
Jay Sifford Garden Design added this to Create a Garden That Tells a StoryJun 23, 2014

Sculpture can also act as punctuation in this way. In this garden the art both draws attention to the bend and brings continuity to the theme by repeating the color of the boardwalk.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

marcy_cent
Marcy Cent added this to landscapingOct 17, 2018

this would be a fun way to explore the yard

gracey5110
Blue Mountain Designs by Grace added this to Rachael's Landscaping IdeasJan 6, 2018

adding a bold color to the garden

hhoouuzzeedd
lyn D added this to Yard RulesNov 14, 2017

Repeat a common color. Instinctively, the human eye is first drawn to color. Use this instinct to your advantage by creating a thread of one color throughout your space. This composition of a red boardwalk and an art piece is a perfect example of how color can be used to best advantage. It gives the visitor a sense of comfort so that he or she is free to explore the myriad plant textures and shapes in this otherwise monochromatic woodland garden.

Similar Ideas
G A R D E N - Pacific Northwest
Woodland garden 1
Seattle Organic Garden
"River" of Japanese forest grass between boulders; Front Garden, winter, 2014.
Seattle Organic Garden
Garden Room Entrance.
G A R D E N - Pacific Northwest

Need help with an existing Houzz order? Call 1-800-368-4268 (Mon-Sun).