Bernal Heights Greenhouse AdditionContemporary Shed, San Francisco

Clara Rice/ Evan Bowman

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laurendunec
Lauren Dunec Design added this to 7 One-of-a-Kind Greenhouses for Gardening and MoreDec 11, 2018

The interior measures about 125 square feet (12 square meters), with built-in raised beds and shelving space for seed trays, herb drying and worm bins. Most of the larger crops are grown on the greenhouse’s sunny rooftop, accessible via a set of metal ship’s stairs.See more of this veggie-filled urban greenhouse

anniekendall
Annie Thornton added this to 10 Great Crops for a Winter GreenhouseDec 8, 2017

Growing in a greenhouse gives you more options for when you start your seeds or set out seedlings. You can set out seedlings for many of these edibles at any time. You can also start seeds at any time and will need to do so for beets, carrots and radishes, which don’t transplant well. Your one concern will be keeping the soil temperature warm enough that the seeds will germinate. You may need to use a germination mat to warm things up. Be sure to keep an eye on daytime temperatures for the best results. Temperatures can go lower at night, but some of these will not do well if nighttime temperatures dip below freezing.All of these grow well in containers — anything from shallow flats to deeper containers, depending on their growing needs. If you’re feeling more ambitious, you can also build garden beds inside your greenhouse.

anniekendall
Annie Thornton added this to Warm Up a Greenhouse for WinterNov 30, 2017

Keep it sunny. The No. 1 tip is to make sure your greenhouse will get sunlight for most or all of the day. A greenhouse that might be in full sun in summer may be shadowed by neighboring buildings and other obstacles during winter, when the sun’s trajectory is lower in the sky. If you want to use your greenhouse year-round, make sure it will be in a sunny spot in the winter months.Add thermal mass. One of the simplest and most low-tech ways to add heat is by using closed containers of water to create what’s known as thermal mass or a heat sink — a source that releases heat during the nighttime hours. The easiest way to do this is to put closed containers of water in your greenhouse. The water will absorb the heat of the sun during the day, then slowly release it at night. It won’t raise the temperature by much, but depending on your location, it can be enough to keep plants and seeds happy.If you have a smaller hobby greenhouse where large barrels will take up too much of the existing space, or if you are simply starting several flats, fill one-gallon plastic jugs about three-quarters full with water, add a cap and place them in your greenhouse among the plants. Paint the outside of the jugs black, or add black food coloring or paint to the water to increase heat absorption. A small amount of bleach will deter algae and mold. Don’t use the water for drinking or watering plants. Take the same approach with larger containers, from five-gallon buckets to 55-gallon plastic, aluminum or steel barrels or drums, which will release even more heat during the night. Paint the outsides black, place them in the corners of your greenhouse, then fill them about three-quarters full with water and close off the tops.

mariannel
Marianne Lipanovich added this to 10 Things to Include in Your GreenhouseNov 14, 2017

Upgrade the flooring. A dirt floor is an easy-care option, but you can also add pavers, which can provide added stability for benches, or gravel to keep it from getting muddy. Lay down landscape cloth first to help keep weeds at bay. Include a sink. Having a sink nearby is a plus when it’s time to plant or transplant. A dry sink will give you a space to work, but you can also put in a full wet sink if you want to add plumbing.

stacyloubriscoe
Stacy Briscoe added this to Houzz Call: Home Farmers, Show Us Your Edible GardensJul 29, 2015

This backyard greenhouse in the Bernal Heights neighborhood of San Francisco is thriving. Owners Tom Cowan and Lynda Smith grow a wide variety of edibles given their small space: lettuce, radicchio, Swiss chard, dandelions (Italian heirloom), onions, strawberries, raspberries, garlic, mint, kale, mustard, curly kale, watercress, basil, parsley, sage, thyme, chives and sorrel. The couple grows most of those edibles in soft GeoPots or Smart Pots, and a few others in cedar planters connected to the soil beneath them.See more of this urban greenhouseYour turn: Whether it’s a container on your balcony or the ground on your backyard farm, we want to see where you’re growing the food you’re eating this summer.Homeowners: Where does your edible garden thrive? Post pictures to the Comments of your rooftop gardens, raised beds, planter boxes or countryside field of greens.Professionals: Show us an edible garden you’ve designed for your clients.More guides to edible gardening

anniekendall
Annie Thornton added this to An Urban Greenhouse Overflows With EdiblesApr 14, 2014

“A greenhouse-conservatory is a kind of sacred space. A lot of things intersect there,” Stanford says. “In addition to functionality, I really wanted the interior to be a spot you could just slow down and breathe.” The cedar planter he built connects directly to the soil beneath. “You get a little of that scent when you water,” he says. Cowan had intended to grow more inside the greenhouse, shown here right after construction, but found the sunlight on top of the greenhouse to be much better.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

samir_absi
Samir Absi added this to samir_absi's ideasJan 26, 2019

Kind Greenhouses for Gardening 4

debvorp
debvorp added this to landscapingJan 6, 2019

Greenhouse with water source and potting area

campbelle_wv
campbelle_wv added this to Potting/conservatory/garden/side EntryJan 4, 2019

Love this as a side entry idea, perhaps with a deep sink and a flag stone floor… Something to come in from the garden through

nihoko
Nikki added this to space with green, natural lightOct 21, 2018

Growing in a greenhouse gives you more options for when you start your seeds or set out seedlings. You can set out seedlings for many of these edibles at any time. You can also start seeds at any time and will need to do so for beets, carrots and radishes, which don’t transplant well. Your one concern will be keeping the soil temperature warm enough that the seeds will germinate. You may need to use a germination mat to warm things up. Be sure to keep an eye on daytime temperatures for the best results. Temperatures can go lower at night, but some of these will not do well if nighttime temperatures dip below freezing.All of these grow well in containers — anything from shallow flats to deeper containers, depending on their growing needs. If you’re feeling more ambitious, you can also build garden beds inside your greenhouse.

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