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Photo of an eclectic landscaping in Charlotte.

Blue Atlas Cedar FenceEclectic Landscape, Charlotte

I designed and installed this "fence" using serpentine and hooked blue atlas cedars. I built an adjustable height support out of painted PVC, threaded steel rods, bamboo, nuts and washers so that the cedars could be trained in an appropriate way. This is one week after installation. The color of the cedar foliage perfectly complements the smoke tree, the Japanese maple and nearly any flower color. This is the back side, from the neighbor's property.

Photo of an eclectic landscaping in Charlotte. —  Houzz
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This photo has 2 questions
Spring Greenworks wrote:May 12, 2012
  • PRO
    Jay Sifford Garden Design
    Thanks! The only background trees in this photo are a tree form cotinus, a Crimson Queen Japanese maple, and a tree form Tardiva hydrangea paniculata.
  • PRO
    M&M Glass Company, LLC

    This is incredibly beautiful!!


ip1diva wrote:Jul 19, 2013
  • PRO
    Jay Sifford Garden Design
    Hi. Thanks for the question. These have only been in ground for two years, so I haven't had to do trimming on them yet. But, when I do, I will prune them before the new growth starts in the spring. Here in Charlotte, zone 8a, that will be late February/early March, but may be different for your area. They are easy to prune, just do it as you would most other trees or shrubs.

What Houzz contributors are saying:

siffordgd
Jay Sifford Garden Design added this to Great Design Plant: Cedrus Atlantica ‘Glauca’Nov 4, 2014

Weeping forms of blue atlas cedar bring a unique sculptural quality and brilliant color wherever they are planted. They are equally at home in Asian gardens and contemporary ones. In my own garden, I created a living fence with five weeping specimens (C. atlantica ‘Glauca Pendula’), as shown here. If you purchase weeping specimens while they’re young, you can remove them from their stakes and reconfigure them. The blue, highly textural foliage of these trees is shown to best advantage when they’re planted with plants that have burgundy or chartreuse foliage. Japanese maple (Acer palmatum), smokebush (Cotinus spp) and ninebark (Physocarpus opulifolius) make perfect garden companions, as do junipers, such as Golden Pacific.Planting notes. Site blue atlas cedar where it will receive at least six hours of sun per day. Average, well-drained soil is best. Water consistently (1 inch of water per week) until the tree is well established.More: More Houzz guides to treesThe Weepers and the Creepers: 10 Intriguing Trees for Your Garden

siffordgd
Jay Sifford Garden Design added this to The Weepers and the Creepers: 10 Intriguing Trees for Your GardenJun 10, 2013

Weeping Blue Atlas Cedar(Cedrus atlantica 'Glauca Pendula')This North African cedar is another workhorse in the garden. The species comes in many different forms, all wonderful, but most specialty nurseries will generally carry one of two weeping forms: either trained in a serpentine pattern and staked, or in a hooked pattern in which the tree bends and heads back toward the ground. Its powdery blue foliage is a perfect complement to the burgundy foliage of a Crimson Queen Japanese maple or a purple smoke bush. It is a slow grower but can eventually become quite large, so some training and pruning will be necessary.I created a living fence in my garden using five of these weepers trained along a horizontal pole. It's a wonderful backdrop for my perennials. A lone specimen is also great for anchoring of bed of burgundy heucheras, zones 4 to 9, or low-growing Purple Pixie loropetalums, zones 7 to 10. Add a patch of Japanese iris, zones 4 to 9, as the contrast between the weeping tree and the vertical iris makes a real statement. USDA zones: 6 to 9Water and soil requirements: Average water; well-draining soilLight requirement: Full to partial sunMature size: 10 feet tall and 15 feet wide in 20 years unless pruned; larger with ageWhen to plant: Fall or spring

What Houzzers are commenting on:

chestil
Irene added this to GardeningMay 8, 2019

Blue Atlas Cedar Fence “Weeping forms of blue atlas cedar bring a unique sculptural quality and brilliant color wherever they are planted. They are equally at home in Asian gardens and contemporary ones. In my own garden, I created a living fence with five weeping specimens (C. atlantica ‘Glauca Pendula’), as shown here. If you purchase weeping specimens while they’re young, you can remove them from their stakes and reconfigure them.”

martha_tritt
Martha Tritt added this to Design & PlantsApr 22, 2019

Blue cedar creeping, cercis canadensis forest pansy, & Japanese maple

gvanwage
Geo Van added this to gvanwage's IdeasJul 25, 2018

Blue atlas cedar with smoke bush

cingwer99
Columbus Consulting added this to DECK GARDENMay 11, 2018

Weeping Blue Atlas Cedar (Cedrus atlantica 'Glauca Pendula') This North African cedar is another workhorse in the garden. The species comes in many different forms, all wonderful, but most specialty nurseries will generally carry one of two weeping forms: either trained in a serpentine pattern and staked, or in a hooked pattern in which the tree bends and heads back toward the ground. Its powdery blue foliage is a perfect complement to the burgundy foliage of a Crimson Queen Japanese maple or a purple smoke bush. It is a slow grower but can eventually become quite large, so some training and pruning will be necessary. I created a living fence in my garden using five of these weepers trained along a horizontal pole. It's a wonderful backdrop for my perennials. A lone specimen is also great for anchoring of bed of burgundy heucheras, zones 4 to 9, or low-growing Purple Pixie loropetalums, zones 7 to 10. Add a patch of Japanese iris, zones 4 to 9, as the contrast between the weeping tree and the vertical iris makes a real statement. USDA zones: 6 to 9 Water and soil requirements: Average water; well-draining soil Light requirement: Full to partial sun Mature size: 10 feet tall and 15 feet wide in 20 years unless pruned; larger with age When to plant: Fall or spring

pamelapetersonenglish
Pamela added this to GardenApr 25, 2018

Show jeff. Cool fence look love it

shane_cudahy
Shane Cudahy added this to Zen YardMar 11, 2018

This living fence is an excellent way to separate two spaces

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