Casa Cabo PulmoTropical Landscape, Mexico City

Inspiration for a tropical landscaping in Mexico City. —  Houzz
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What Houzz contributors are saying:

melanieloftus
Melanie Loftus added this to What Is a Living Building?Jul 10, 2014

EquityEchoing the place petal, the equity petal emphasizes building human-scale buildings that provide Americans with Disabilities Act–compliant accessibility and universal access to nature.The equity petal challenges some traditional views about private property. To enable universal access to nature, a living building must consider its neighbors and, for instance, be built to a height that still allows for a neighbor’s access to sunlight. Living buildings also agree not to expose a neighbor to air pollution or noxious emissions, or to restrict public access to natural waterways.Major organizations involved in a living building project are also encouraged to provide transparency around their business practices and social justice and equity policies.

lolalina
Laura Gaskill added this to How to Add an Indoor or Outdoor RampFeb 6, 2014

For an exterior ramp, look for an architect or a landscape architect whose work appeals to you. A landscape architect is especially well suited for integrating ramps with plantings and other outdoor features, but some architecture and design-build firms also have this experience. A peek at portfolios along with a phone conversation or online chat should make it clear what type of work the person or company is equipped to do.

anvl369
Sheridan Interiors, Kitchens and Baths added this to 3 Home Features to Boost AccessibilitySep 28, 2012

Even on hillsides, ramps and slopes can be artfully blended into the landscape. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) specifications require a slope ratio of 1:12, which means that for every 1 foot of ramp, the rise should not exceed 1 inch. Therefore, if your home has an entry point that's 16 inches above level ground, your ramp will need to be 16 feet long.

cathylara
Cathy Lara added this to Houzz Tour: Mexican Home Gets an All-Access PassMar 16, 2012

A closer look at the ramps during the day. "The ramps were designed as a series of pauses and sweeps through the garden. The ramps finally end in a four-sided terrace thrust toward the sea, bridging back to the main terraces in the upper floor of the house," says House.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

peggyharris7070
home owner added this to ExteriorNov 17, 2017

interesting look for ramp if front entry is too steep. Use side railings as planters. article from Houzz says, "Even on hillsides, ramps and slopes can be artfully blended into the landscape. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) specifications require a slope ratio of 1:12, which means that for every 1 foot of ramp, the rise should not exceed 1 inch. Therefore, if your home has an entry point that's 16 inches above level ground, your ramp will need to be 16 feet long.

bestbrownies
Gwen added this to accessibleMay 2, 2017

Even on hillsides, ramps and slopes can be artfully blended into the landscape. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) specifications require a slope ratio of 1:12, which means that for every 1 foot of ramp, the rise should not exceed 1 inch. Therefore, if your home has an entry point that's 16 inches above level ground, your ramp will need to be 16 feet long.

nozipho_vezi
Nozipho Vezi added this to nozipho_vezi's ideasJun 28, 2015

What i like is that even people with mobllity disabilities can access my house.

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