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Home design - eclectic home design idea in Charlotte

Cascade Falls weeping bald cypressEclectic , Charlotte

Jay Sifford

Home design - eclectic home design idea in Charlotte —  Houzz
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Questions About This Photo (4)
lazikus wrote:May 11, 2017
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    Jay Sifford Garden Design

    This tree is naturally weeping. I staked it on bent rebar for about 5 years, recently removing it. It does not develop a central leader. However, a similar cultivar called Falling Waters will do that. For an arbor, Cascade Falls is much better if you can find it. I prune out most of the downward branches that would inhibit traffic through the walkway, but that is it.

  • lazikus

    Thank you so much for the information! I found the Cascade Falls variety at a local nursery and hope to recreate your creative design. I am currently deciding on a location and not sure what to plant nearby that will add winter interest. :-)

birdsong22 wrote:Apr 1, 2015
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    Jay Sifford Garden Design

    Hi. Bald cypress is touted to want full sun, but I find that not to be the case. Mine gets about 5 hours of morning/mid-day sun and does great. Hope this helps. Thanks for the compliment and good luck.

  • birdsong22

    Thanks- off to the nursery tomorrow!

pjregner wrote:Jan 23, 2014
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    Jay Sifford Garden Design
    I do not have experience with this tree in that situation, so cannot say for sure. I did look at juglone tolerant trees and this one is not listed, so I would have to conclude that it would not be a good choice for you.
rupertthecat wrote:Apr 27, 2016

    What Houzz contributors are saying:

    siffordgd
    Jay Sifford Garden Design added this to Get Your Garden Moving for a Magical MoodApr 20, 2014

    You might also consider planting a tree with very large leaves, such as big leaf magnolia (Magnolia macrophylia, zones 5 to 8), or a weeping tree, such as this Cascade Falls bald cypress (Taxodium distichum ‘Cascade Falls’, zones 4 to 9). These trees will put on quite a show in the wind.

    siffordgd
    Jay Sifford Garden Design added this to Explore Your Garden Personality: The CollectorJan 5, 2014

    My garden has been very forgiving and patient with me. My collection phases have historically resembled the Chinese calendar. There was the year of the heuchera and the year of the hosta; then came daylilies, Oriental lilies, Japanese maples and conifers. In my evolving zeal for collecting, some of these plants survived, some died and some were removed.

    siffordgd
    Jay Sifford Garden Design added this to What Kind of Gardener Are You? Find Your ArchetypeNov 26, 2013

    The collector. The collector is driven by a passion for having “one of this and one of that” or the best of it all. You will frequently find the collector at a farmer’s market early on a Saturday morning, scoping out treasures from among the plant vendors, or at botanical garden plant sales. Whether the plants are weeping conifers, Japanese maples or daylilies, the garden of the collector tells a story about its owner and his or her passions.The challenge the collector faces in creating a garden is how to bring unity and a peaceful flow to a possibly mismatched collection of plants. The answer lies in the use of repetition and mass plantings of secondary plants. A carpet of Caradonna Meadow Sage (Salvia nemorosa ‘Caradonna’, USDA zones 4 to 9), moss or tassel ferns (Polystichum polyblepharum, zones 6 to 8) can tame and weave together even the most unorganized collection.Another way of dealing with a disparate collection is by employing the technique of juxtaposition. By taking plant shape, color, texture and size into consideration and pairing plants with two of these things in common, a sense of logical order will begin to emerge, while the unique qualities of each plant will still be preserved.More about garden “collectors”

    siffordgd
    Jay Sifford Garden Design added this to The Weepers and the Creepers: 10 Intriguing Trees for Your GardenJun 10, 2013

    Cascade Falls Bald Cypress(Taxodium distichum 'Cascade Falls')Bald cypress is an amazing conifer, partly because it is one of the few conifers that is deciduous. This weeping variety has delicate fern-like foliage that emerges chartreuse in the spring and turns a rich orange in autumn. It also develops amazing cones in late summer and has beautiful exfoliating bark. A bonus is that this tree will grow in very wet soil as well as average soil. If your garden has a challenging wet spot, this tree could be the one for you.If you have an arbor in your garden, try one of these trained up instead of a pedestrian vine to cover the structure. Your clematis-loving friends will be envious.USDA zones: 4 to 10Water and soil requirements: Wet to average soilLight requirement: Full to partial sunMature size: Generally 8 feet tall, depending on how the plant is stakedWhen to plant: Fall or spring

    What Houzzers are commenting on:

    eveedog14
    Stephanie Corcoran added this to 444 16thMar 24, 2019

    Color changes with season; can train to trellis

    rockymtn_nan
    Deb Jay added this to PorchesJun 28, 2018

    Cascade Falls weeping bald cypress

    cingwer99
    Columbus Consulting added this to DECK GARDENMay 11, 2018

    Cascade Falls Bald Cypress (Taxodium distichum 'Cascade Falls') Bald cypress is an amazing conifer, partly because it is one of the few conifers that is deciduous. This weeping variety has delicate fern-like foliage that emerges chartreuse in the spring and turns a rich orange in autumn. It also develops amazing cones in late summer and has beautiful exfoliating bark. A bonus is that this tree will grow in very wet soil as well as average soil. If your garden has a challenging wet spot, this tree could be the one for you. If you have an arbor in your garden, try one of these trained up instead of a pedestrian vine to cover the structure. Your clematis-loving friends will be envious. USDA zones: 4 to 10 Water and soil requirements: Wet to average soil Light requirement: Full to partial sun Mature size: Generally 8 feet tall, depending on how the plant is staked When to plant: Fall or spring

    jlsandager
    Louisa DS added this to YardsApr 10, 2018

    Just one Cypress tree is planted here. The trunk is on the left. This photo is several years old. It's grown a lot more since then and is even more spectacular now! This tree is naturally weeping. I staked it on bent rebar for about 5 years, recently removing it. It does not develop a central leader. However, a similar cultivar called Falling Waters will do that. For an arbor, Cascade Falls is much better if you can find it. I prune out most of the downward branches that would inhibit traffic through the walkway, but that is it.

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