0
Your shopping cart is empty.
Design ideas for a traditional side yard landscaping in San Francisco.

Classical entrywayTraditional Landscape, San Francisco

Columnar evergreens provide a rhythmic structure to the flowing bluestone entry walk that terminates in a fountain courtyard. A soothing palette of green and white plantings keeps the space feeling lush and cool. Photo credit: Verdance Fine Garden Design

Design ideas for a traditional side yard landscaping in San Francisco. —  Houzz
Related Photo Topics
Related Professionals in San Francisco
This photo has 35 questions
sodia57 wrote:Jul 17, 2013
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Plants, like the rest of us, have genetic destinies; so if a tree "wants" to grow 20 feet tall, keeping it smaller will require ongoing pruning — and keeping it both smaller AND attractive will require meticulous attention. (Bonsai artists are the pinnacle of this work.) If you really love the cypress and no other species will do, you could take advantage of its slow growth: enjoy it while it's young, and replace it with another when it ultimately gets too large for your liking.
donnaeb wrote:Aug 13, 2012
  • Sucheta Potnis
    Wonderful creation and more importantly, great answers. Unlike so many questions on Houzz which go unanswered, you have been generous with your responses. Hope the many other providers learn from that. Bravo.
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Thank you, Sucheta! You just made my evening.
rbcola wrote:Aug 8, 2012
  • PRO
    Heynssens + Grassman, Inc.
    As landscape architects in Illinois I can advise you that neither the fig nor cypress would survive outside in the Midwest. Try Skyrocket Juniper or other juniper species. Also try cultivars of Chamaecyparis - false cypress, which has a similar narrow, upright habit. Columnar Oak is deciduous and will easily attain 5' in width and 25' in height, so make sure you have space for it.
  • Laura Armstrong

    emerald arborvitae works in my climate, the Atlanta area. It's not quite as skinny but has similar effect. This is quite beautiful by the way and I'm trying to recreate it for my new entryway to my backyard. Thank you for showing us amazing things in small spaces!


Mary Snorton wrote:Jan 19, 2015
  • Mabel Galvin

    I need some very narrow trees and shrubs to put by a fence. The space is one foot five inches. I would like some Evergreens that will grow in Duluth, Minnnesota.

  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Mabel, Duluth is well enough outside the area I work in that I couldn't begin to recommend plants for you. I would start with either a local landscape designer (a quick search at www.apld.org yields http://www.northernlightslandscaping.org); or just stop into a garden center near you to describe your space and see whether they can recommend something. Good luck!

    —John

Suzanne Decker wrote:Jan 17, 2015
  • falbarsky

    What are the white plants on each side of the walk? It looks like maybe 2 different varieties. Just beautiful!

  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Thank you! I'm glad you like them so much. There are white Impatiens as well as white 'Darwisnow' tulips in these spring borders.

    —John

suzieliz wrote:Feb 10, 2013
  • caroldfear
    Love this look. We live in central Florida and want to re do our front entrance. Is the blue stone slippery when wet? We have a earth tone brick house with salmon and orange.
    The brick borders are brilliant for step safety.
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Glad you like the look! Connecticut bluestone is a sandstone with excellent slip resistance.
    -John
arkyinohio wrote:Mar 19, 2011
Antoinette Leatherberry wrote:Jan 15, 2015
louisefreeman wrote:Apr 2, 2012
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Thanks for asking! The "hedge" behind the juniper trees actually is a wall covered in Creeping Fig (Ficus pumila). The large shrub in the back corner is English Laurel (Prunus laurocerasus).
  • PRO
    carla_jacobs
    Stuning! Wish this could work in Virginia!
ja5salsa wrote:May 23, 2011
  • motherbear
    Those are Delta white pansies(annuals).
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Hi, those actually are white Impatiens. This is a cool-season annual that should be readily available at nurseries. Thanks for asking!
    John
exec23 wrote:Jun 7, 2016
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Thanks for asking! In the background there is a creeping fig (Ficus pumila) on the wall, with compact Italian cypress (Cupressus sempervirens 'Tiny Tower') in front. Other shrubs providing structure include Osmanthus fragrans, Viburnum davidii and Spiraea japonica; then the white flowers include perennials such as Francoa ramosa, as well as annual tulips ('Hakuun' is a nice white variety), pansy and impatiens.

Annia Nunez wrote:May 22, 2016
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Check with your local garden center or nursery to see whether they stock, or can order, Cupressus sempervirens 'Tiny Tower' from Monrovia Growers. (The generic variety 'Compacta' should have a similar growth habit, but Monrovia's patented version would be more reliable.) The price will vary depending on source, species and size.

    Thanks for asking!
    —John
mamadada wrote:Apr 25, 2016
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Check with your local garden center or nursery to see whether they stock, or can order, Cupressus sempervirens 'Tiny Tower' from Monrovia Growers. The generic variety 'Compacta' should have a similar growth habit, but Monrovia's patented version would be more reliable. Thanks for asking!

    —John

Carolyn Mullins wrote:Aug 23, 2015
sniky012003 wrote:Jul 28, 2015
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Check with your local garden center or nursery to see whether they stock, or can order, Cupressus sempervirens 'Tiny Tower' from Monrovia Growers.

    —John

alla0770 wrote:Jul 22, 2015
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Thank you for asking. Although I design only in the San Francisco area -- particularly in the Mediterranean climate of Palo Alto and Menlo Park -- the Connecticut bluestone and red brick are classical New England hardscape materials that I'm sure can withstand any type of weather if properly installed. As for the plants, although the white impatiens and tulips are annuals that can bloom once almost anywhere, the taller cypress trees and creeping fig vines are evolved to a mild climate and probably would not survive New England winters. Check www.apld.org to find a garden designer near you who could speak more authoritatively to all of this!

    —John

sligoman wrote:Jun 22, 2015
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    This front entry garden was one part of a larger design, so it's difficult to estimate the cost for just this area. The entire project budget was greater than $100,000.
Anastasia Sharamitaro Walters wrote:Jun 22, 2015
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Anastasia, I'm glad you like it! The walkway is Connecticut bluestone with a brick border. It's wet in this photo, so the colors are very rich; dry it is more of a pale blue-gray with some tan and purple mottling.

lxx1 wrote:Jun 10, 2015
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    'Tiny Tower' is a patented variety of Italian cypress, botanical name Cupressus sempervirens, developed by Monrovia Growers (see http://www.monrovia.com/plant-catalog/plants/1028/tiny-tower-italian-cypress/). As with pharmaceuticals, once a plant's patent expires (17-20 years after issue), a market for "generic" versions opens up. So, even if you can't find 'Tiny Tower,' you may be able to find a similar, non-patented cultivar of Cupressus sempervirens sold as 'Dwarf Compacta', 'Compacta', 'Dwarf,' or similar.


    According to Monrovia:

    "Very slow growth to just 8-10 ft. tall, 2 ft. wide in 10 years, eventually to 25-30 ft. tall, 3 ft. wide."


    Monrovia doesn't sell directly to consumers, but your local garden center should be able to order it (you can also use the Monrovia web site to find local garden centers who sell Monrovia plants). Prices will vary depending on the size and cultivar you purchase, so ask your local garden center or nursery.

    Good luck!
    —John

Reva Khanna wrote:May 28, 2015
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Reva, I'd suggest calling around to local nurseries or garden centers and asking for the availability and prices of the trees in different size containers.

    —John

tex8ranch wrote:May 27, 2015
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Sorry, Tex, I have no idea. I'd say, call your local nursery or garden center and ask whether they can tell you the prices of the trees in different size containers.

    —John

tex8ranch wrote:May 27, 2015
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Sorry, Tex, I have no idea. I'd say, call your local nursery or garden center and ask whether they can tell you the prices of the trees in different size containers.

    —John

nslonaker wrote:May 26, 2015
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Hi, those are white Impatiens. This is an annual that will do fine in shade, just don't expect them to last beyond the cool season. Thanks for asking!
    John

Carolyn Mullins wrote:May 6, 2015
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Carolyn, per the growers at Monrovia: "Very slow growth to just 8-10 ft. tall, 2 ft. wide in 10 years, eventually to 25-30 ft. tall, 3 ft. wide."

Carolyn Mullins wrote:May 6, 2015
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Carolyn, per the growers at Monrovia: "Very slow growth to just 8-10 ft. tall, 2 ft. wide in 10 years, eventually to 25-30 ft. tall, 3 ft. wide."

Carolyn Mullins wrote:May 6, 2015
Eslee Smith wrote:Jan 18, 2015
lxx1 wrote:Sep 29, 2014
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Cupressus 'Tiny Tower' should be available at any nursery or home-improvement center where Monrovia plants are sold. Many growers also carry a "generic" version often called 'Compacta'.

lxx1 wrote:Sep 29, 2014
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Cupressus 'Tiny Tower' should be available at any nursery or home-improvement center where Monrovia plants are sold. Many growers also carry a "generic" version often called 'Compacta'.

lxx1 wrote:Sep 29, 2014
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design

    Cupressus 'Tiny Tower' should be available at any nursery or home-improvement center where Monrovia plants are sold. Many growers also carry a "generic" version often called 'Compacta'.

lxx1 wrote:Sep 29, 2014
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    'Tiny Tower' is a patented variety of Italian cypress, botanical name Cupressus sempervirens, developed by Monrovia Growers (see http://www.monrovia.com/plant-catalog/plants/1028/tiny-tower-italian-cypress/). Monrovia doesn't sell directly to consumers, but your local garden center should be able to order it (you can also use the Monrovia web site to find local garden centers who sell Monrovia plants).

    As with pharmaceuticals, once a plant's patent expires (17-20 years after issue), a market for "generic" versions opens up. So, even if you can't find 'Tiny Tower,' you may be able to find a similar, non-patented cultivar of Cupressus sempervirens sold as 'Dwarf Compacta', 'Compacta', 'Dwarf,' or similar.

    Good luck!
    —John
lxx1 wrote:Sep 29, 2014
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Cupressus 'Tiny Tower' is a patented form produced by Monrovia Nursery, one of the country's largest growers — I would expect that most garden centers would be able to order it for you. Alternately, there is a "generic" dwarf form commonly called Cupressus 'Compacta'; but as with most generic anything, there may be variations from crop to crop and plant to plant. If you find a reliable source for 'Tiny Tower,' please share it with us… good luck!
    —John
andrejkabee wrote:Sep 19, 2014
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Well, "odd" is in the eye of the beholder — for the classical style of this home, in my opinion bamboo would have looked odd. But your tastes and opinions may be different, and that's OK too!

    There may be many different options to choose from to create privacy screening. A landscape designer would consider the specific conditions of your site before considering looks: sun/shade exposure, damp/dry soil, narrow/wide planting area, to name a few. Then within the set of plants that will thrive in those conditions, I would consider the functional attributes of the plants themselves: evergreen/deciduous, clumping/spreading, toxic/nontoxic, short/tall, fast/slow growth, high/low water needs, and so on. Finally, within that subset of plants that have appropriate features, I would choose the plants that fit the aesthetic look you prefer: the Italian Cypress used here work well with a formal, classic style, while bamboo species (and there are many!) may convey a more tropical or Asian feeling. Even the same plant could be used different ways: Pittosporum tenuifolium can be clipped tightly to create a formal hedge, or left loose for a natural, shrubby look.

    While the aesthetic choice is purely personal, the site conditions and plant attributes are non-negotiable. Figure those out first, and you may find that your plant choice is made for you. Good luck!

    —John
tmarere wrote:Dec 8, 2013
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    Those are white tulips and white Impatiens, both of which bloom in late winter/early spring here in the San Francisco area. I don't recall the specific cultivar names, but for bulbs like tulips one of my favorite sources is www.brentandbeckysbulbs.com . Happy gardening!
Esther Lira Barajas wrote:Nov 24, 2013
  • PRO
    Verdance Landscape Design
    That "hedge" actually is a vine on the fence: evergreen creeping fig, or Ficus pumila.

What Houzz contributors are saying:

amandapollard
Amanda Pollard added this to Creative Edges for Garden Borders and PathsJul 20, 2018

1. Lay bricks flush with the surface. Bricks make a neat edge for your flower beds. For a streamlined look, lay them flush with the ground. This is particularly effective when the border is next to a lawn since the mower blades can easily move over it. These bricks separate the borders from the path and allow the flowers to hang over the walkway without blocking it. Bricks can be an inexpensive edging material. There are online tutorials that show you how to lay a row of bricks between the border and the lawn, but for a really attractive finish, it’s best to get help from an expert.Find a landscape contractor

mariannel
Marianne Lipanovich added this to Plant Tulips for March-to-May BloomsAug 4, 2017

How to use it. Tulips are quite at home in formal gardens, thanks to their upright habit, and look stunning when used in mass plantings or as a border to a sidewalk or path. For a more casual look, scatter them randomly throughout your landscape or intersperse them with other spring blooms in garden beds. Species tulips are a lovely addition to a rock garden. Tulips are also a great choice for containers. You can put them on display when they’re at their peak bloom without worrying about messy foliage before and after.

cyanhorticulture
CYAN Horticulture added this to 5 Structural Plants to Frame Your Garden BeautifullyJan 19, 2013

Dwarf Italian Cypress (Cupressus sempervirens 'Tiny Tower')Presented with a small space — an urban courtyard or a roof patio — I always devote considerable attention to structural plants. With solid bones, such a small space will come to life and endure. In this charming example, pencil-shaped dwarf Italian cypresses (Cupressus sempervirens 'Tiny Tower') lead the way.USDA zones: 7 to 10 (find your zone)Water requirement: Well-drained soilLight requirement: Full sunMature size: 30 feet tall and 3 feet wideSeasonal interest: Year-roundWhen to plant: Anytime

karenchapman
Le jardinet added this to Monochromatic Garden Magic Done 7 WaysJan 11, 2013

If you like the idea of a white garden but don't want to commit to such a large area, try flanking a pathway with a simple springtime combination. White daffodils or tulips could join pansies or white forget-me-nots (Myosotis sp, zones 3 to 8) for an early-season display. In a shadier spot, a mass planting of snowdrops would be delightful.

paintboxgarden
Paintbox Garden added this to 20 Ways to Work White Magic in Your YardJan 10, 2013

16. Anchor tall plantings. In this San Francisco garden, white tulips lend a pristine formality to a brick-edged, curved stone walkway. Punctuated with columnar evergreens, the look is understated and timeless, and can be easily switched once the flowers fade.

luannbrandsen
LuAnn Brandsen added this to 10 Beautiful Ways to Landscape With BulbsAug 19, 2012

In monochromatic schemes, the bulbs' main role is to provide design interest rather than color. As a result, you can use fewer bulbs to accomplish the goal. In this photo, small staggered groupings of tulips provide rhythm and repetition, leading the eye down the path to the front door.

mydesignchic
Kristy Woodson Harvey and Beth Woodson added this to Pick the Perfect Front Walkway MaterialJul 31, 2012

Slate is an exceptional walkway material because it doesn't absorb water, isn't affected by direct sunlight and can stand up to extreme weather conditions. The subtle color palette coordinates nicely with most landscapes.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

hlevy
Heather Levy Alden added this to hlevy's IdeasMay 7, 2019

Love the tiny tower and the all white flowers

monkeyremodel
Steve & Q added this to BackyardMay 2, 2019

Love green plants with white flowers

Similar Ideas
traditional cottage garden rancho santa fe landscape brick stone turfstone
Cottage garden
Windsor Companies
Secret retreat garden
Contemporary Kitchen Garden
Watertown Garden
San Marino
Front entry garden
Family Retreat
Water features
Projects
Orono
Cottage Garden
Traditional Landscape
Fireplaces
Woodland Retreat
Past Projects
Unity with a Wealth of Detail
Front Entries
Courtyard Garden
Landscapes with Similar Colors
Raised Stone Garden Beds
Creative sustainable waterfront landscape design-Eastern shore Md
An Active Lifestyle
Garden
Oakville Waterfront
Traditional Landscape
Edina Addition & Remodeling
Goodman Landscape Design
Meadow grasses

Need help with an existing Houzz order? Call 1-800-368-4268 (Mon-Sun).