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Corner Lot Pool Ideas & Photos

Naples Beach Coastal Retreat Pool Deck
Naples Beach Coastal Retreat Pool Deck
41 West
View of Covered Patio, grass sun deck, and pool from back corner of pool: 41 West Coastal Retreat Series reveals creative, fresh ideas, for a new look to define the casual beach lifestyle of Naples. More than a dozen custom variations and sizes are available to be built on your lot. From this spacious 3,000 square foot, 3 bedroom model, to larger 4 and 5 bedroom versions ranging from 3,500 - 10,000 square feet, including guest house options.
Contemporary Pool
Contemporary Pool
Inspiration for a contemporary rectangular pool remodel in Orange County
77 Bal Harbour
77 Bal Harbour
SDH Studio Architecture and Interior Design
SDH Studio - Architecture and Design Location: Bal Harbour, Florida, USA Set in a magnificent corner lot in Bal Harbour Village the site is filled with natural light. This contemporary home is conceived as an open floor plan that integrates indoor with outdoor maximizing family living and entertaining.
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Poolside Outdoor Kitchen and Pergola
Poolside Outdoor Kitchen and Pergola
MARK IV Builders, Inc
A small gazebo was replaced by this spacious outdoor kitchen with covered patio and gazebo. Flagstone lines the floor inside of the kitchen and throughout the patio. A large firepit adds warmth and light once the sun sets.
Shaker Heights
Shaker Heights
9th Avenue Designs
Photo by Scott Pease
Hot tub - traditional backyard rectangular and concrete paver hot tub idea in Cleveland
Modern by Nature
Modern by Nature
Gulch Design Group
Inspiration for a mid-sized southwestern backyard concrete paver and custom-shaped lap hot tub remodel in Salt Lake City
Ethridge Residence
Ethridge Residence
Cornerstone Architects
Located on a small infill lot in central Austin, this residence was designed to meet the needs of a growing family and an ambitious program. The program had to address challenging city and neighborhood restrictions while maintaining an open floor plan. The exterior materials are employed to define volumes and translate between the defined forms. This vocabulary continues visually inside the home. On this tight lot, it was important to openly connect the main living areas with the exterior, integrating the rear screened-in terrace with the backyard and pool. The Owner's Suite maintains privacy on the quieter corner of the lot. Natural light was an important factor in design. Glazing works in tandem with the deep overhangs to provide ambient lighting and allows for the most pleasing views. Natural materials and light, which were critical to the clients, help define the house to achieve a simplistic, clean demeanor in this historic neighborhood. Photography by Jerry Hayes
Kessler Park Modern
Kessler Park Modern
Randy Angell Designs
The planning phase of this modern retreat was an intense collaboration that took place over the course of more than two years. While the initial design concept exceeded the clients' expectations, it also exceeded their budget beyond the point of comfort. The next several months were spent modifying the design, in attempts to lower the budget. Ultimately, the decision was made that they would hold off on the project until they could budget for the original design, rather than compromising the vision. About a year later, we repeated that same process, which resulted in the same outcome. After another year-long hiatus, we met once again. We revisited design thoughts, each of us bringing to the table new ideas and options. Each thought simply solidified the fact that the initial vision was absolutely what we all wanted to see come to fruition, and the decision was finally made to move forward. The main challenge of the site was elevation. The Southeast corner of the lot stands 5'6" above the threshold of the rear door, while the Northeast corner dropped a full 2' below the threshold of the door. The backyard was also long and narrow, sloping side-to-side and toward the house. The key to the design concept was to deftly place the project into the slope and utilize the elevation changes, without allowing them to dominate the yard, or overwhelm the senses. The unseen challenge on this project came in the form of hitting every underground issue possible. We had to relocate the sewer main, the gas line, and the electrical service; and since rock was sitting about 6" below the surface, all of these had to be chiseled through many feet of dense rock, adding to our projected timeline and budget. As you enter the space, your first stop is an outdoor living area. Smooth finished concrete, colored to match the 'Leuder' limestone coping, has a subtle saw-cut pattern aligned with the edges of the recessed fire pit. In small spaces, it is important to consider a multi-purpose approach. So, the recessed fire pit has been fitted with an aluminum cover that allows our client to set up tables and chairs for entertaining, right over the top of the fire pit. From here, it;s two steps up to the pool elevation, and the floating 'Leuder' limestone stepper pads that lead across the pool and hide the dam wall of the flush spa. The main retaining wall to the Southeast is a poured concrete wall with an integrated sheer descent waterfall into the spa. To bring in some depth and texture, a 'Brownstone' ledgestone was used to face both the dropped beam on the pool, and the raised beam of the water feature wall. The main water feature is comprised of five custom made stainless steel scuppers, supplied by a dedicated booster pump. Colored concrete stepper pads lead to the 'Ipe' wood deck at the far end of the pool. The placement of this wood deck allowed us to minimize our use of retaining walls on the Northeast end of the yard, since it drops off over three feet below the elevation of the pool beam. One of the most unique features on this project has to be the structure over the dining area. With a unique combination of steel and wood, the clean modern aesthetic of this structure creates a visual stamp in the space that standard structure could not accomplish. 4" steel posts, painted charcoal grey, are set on an angle, 4' into the bedrock, to anchor the structure. Steel I-beams painted in green-yellow color--aptly called "frolic"--act as the base to the hefty cedar rafters of the roof structure, which has a slight pitch toward the rear. A hidden gutter on the back of the roof sends water down a copper rain chain, and into the drainage system. The backdrop for both this dining area , as well as the living area, is the horizontal screen panel, created with alternating sizes of cedar planks, stained to a calm hue of dove grey.
Riverview House
Riverview House
Albert, Righter & Tittmann Architects, Inc.
Overlooking the river down a sweep of lawn and pasture, this is a big house that looks like a collection of small houses. The approach is orchestrated so that the view of the river is hidden from the driveway. You arrive in a courtyard defined on two sides by the pavilions of the house, which are arranged in an L-shape, and on a third side by the barn The living room and family room pavilions are clad in painted flush boards, with bold details in the spirit of the Greek Revival houses which abound in New England. The attached garage and free-standing barn are interpretations of the New England barn vernacular. The connecting wings between the pavilions are shingled, and distinct in materials and flavor from the pavilions themselves. All the rooms are oriented towards the river. A combined kitchen/family room occupies the ground floor of the corner pavilion. The eating area is like a pavilion within a pavilion, an elliptical space half in and half out of the house. The ceiling is like a shallow tented canopy that reinforces the specialness of this space. Photography by Robert Benson
Ethridge Residence
Ethridge Residence
Cornerstone Architects
Located on a small infill lot in central Austin, this residence was designed to meet the needs of a growing family and an ambitious program. The program had to address challenging city and neighborhood restrictions while maintaining an open floor plan. The exterior materials are employed to define volumes and translate between the defined forms. This vocabulary continues visually inside the home. On this tight lot, it was important to openly connect the main living areas with the exterior, integrating the rear screened-in terrace with the backyard and pool. The Owner's Suite maintains privacy on the quieter corner of the lot. Natural light was an important factor in design. Glazing works in tandem with the deep overhangs to provide ambient lighting and allows for the most pleasing views. Natural materials and light, which were critical to the clients, help define the house to achieve a simplistic, clean demeanor in this historic neighborhood. Photography by Jerry Hayes
Kessler Park Modern
Kessler Park Modern
Randy Angell Designs
The planning phase of this modern retreat was an intense collaboration that took place over the course of more than two years. While the initial design concept exceeded the clients' expectations, it also exceeded their budget beyond the point of comfort. The next several months were spent modifying the design, in attempts to lower the budget. Ultimately, the decision was made that they would hold off on the project until they could budget for the original design, rather than compromising the vision. About a year later, we repeated that same process, which resulted in the same outcome. After another year-long hiatus, we met once again. We revisited design thoughts, each of us bringing to the table new ideas and options. Each thought simply solidified the fact that the initial vision was absolutely what we all wanted to see come to fruition, and the decision was finally made to move forward. The main challenge of the site was elevation. The Southeast corner of the lot stands 5'6" above the threshold of the rear door, while the Northeast corner dropped a full 2' below the threshold of the door. The backyard was also long and narrow, sloping side-to-side and toward the house. The key to the design concept was to deftly place the project into the slope and utilize the elevation changes, without allowing them to dominate the yard, or overwhelm the senses. The unseen challenge on this project came in the form of hitting every underground issue possible. We had to relocate the sewer main, the gas line, and the electrical service; and since rock was sitting about 6" below the surface, all of these had to be chiseled through many feet of dense rock, adding to our projected timeline and budget. As you enter the space, your first stop is an outdoor living area. Smooth finished concrete, colored to match the 'Leuder' limestone coping, has a subtle saw-cut pattern aligned with the edges of the recessed fire pit. In small spaces, it is important to consider a multi-purpose approach. So, the recessed fire pit has been fitted with an aluminum cover that allows our client to set up tables and chairs for entertaining, right over the top of the fire pit. From here, it;s two steps up to the pool elevation, and the floating 'Leuder' limestone stepper pads that lead across the pool and hide the dam wall of the flush spa. The main retaining wall to the Southeast is a poured concrete wall with an integrated sheer descent waterfall into the spa. To bring in some depth and texture, a 'Brownstone' ledgestone was used to face both the dropped beam on the pool, and the raised beam of the water feature wall. The main water feature is comprised of five custom made stainless steel scuppers, supplied by a dedicated booster pump. Colored concrete stepper pads lead to the 'Ipe' wood deck at the far end of the pool. The placement of this wood deck allowed us to minimize our use of retaining walls on the Northeast end of the yard, since it drops off over three feet below the elevation of the pool beam. One of the most unique features on this project has to be the structure over the dining area. With a unique combination of steel and wood, the clean modern aesthetic of this structure creates a visual stamp in the space that standard structure could not accomplish. 4" steel posts, painted charcoal grey, are set on an angle, 4' into the bedrock, to anchor the structure. Steel I-beams painted in green-yellow color--aptly called "frolic"--act as the base to the hefty cedar rafters of the roof structure, which has a slight pitch toward the rear. A hidden gutter on the back of the roof sends water down a copper rain chain, and into the drainage system. The backdrop for both this dining area , as well as the living area, is the horizontal screen panel, created with alternating sizes of cedar planks, stained to a calm hue of dove grey.
Hamburg Cove
Hamburg Cove
Nautilus Architects LLC
New construction on the Connecticut River in New England featuring custom in ground infinity pool and hot tub located en centre. Pool is flanked by newly constructed pool house featuring sliding glass doors and custom built in interior.
Close up of rear bracket and view of Screened Porch
Close up of rear bracket and view of Screened Porch
Christopher A Rose AIA, ASID
Rion Rizzo, Creative Sources Photography
Pool - pool idea in Charleston
New Projects
New Projects
Carolina Design Associates, LLC
Elegant pool house photo in Charlotte
Landmark Builders
Landmark Builders
Landmark Builders
Outdoor Living at it's best! Pool w/waterfall and rock slide. Hot tub and firepit. View deck is situated perfectly for conversations and the top of the rock retaining wall houses a sport court designed to take in amazing view of the lake!
Kessler Park Modern
Kessler Park Modern
Randy Angell Designs
The planning phase of this modern retreat was an intense collaboration that took place over the course of more than two years. While the initial design concept exceeded the clients' expectations, it also exceeded their budget beyond the point of comfort. The next several months were spent modifying the design, in attempts to lower the budget. Ultimately, the decision was made that they would hold off on the project until they could budget for the original design, rather than compromising the vision. About a year later, we repeated that same process, which resulted in the same outcome. After another year-long hiatus, we met once again. We revisited design thoughts, each of us bringing to the table new ideas and options. Each thought simply solidified the fact that the initial vision was absolutely what we all wanted to see come to fruition, and the decision was finally made to move forward. The main challenge of the site was elevation. The Southeast corner of the lot stands 5'6" above the threshold of the rear door, while the Northeast corner dropped a full 2' below the threshold of the door. The backyard was also long and narrow, sloping side-to-side and toward the house. The key to the design concept was to deftly place the project into the slope and utilize the elevation changes, without allowing them to dominate the yard, or overwhelm the senses. The unseen challenge on this project came in the form of hitting every underground issue possible. We had to relocate the sewer main, the gas line, and the electrical service; and since rock was sitting about 6" below the surface, all of these had to be chiseled through many feet of dense rock, adding to our projected timeline and budget. As you enter the space, your first stop is an outdoor living area. Smooth finished concrete, colored to match the 'Leuder' limestone coping, has a subtle saw-cut pattern aligned with the edges of the recessed fire pit. In small spaces, it is important to consider a multi-purpose approach. So, the recessed fire pit has been fitted with an aluminum cover that allows our client to set up tables and chairs for entertaining, right over the top of the fire pit. From here, it;s two steps up to the pool elevation, and the floating 'Leuder' limestone stepper pads that lead across the pool and hide the dam wall of the flush spa. The main retaining wall to the Southeast is a poured concrete wall with an integrated sheer descent waterfall into the spa. To bring in some depth and texture, a 'Brownstone' ledgestone was used to face both the dropped beam on the pool, and the raised beam of the water feature wall. The main water feature is comprised of five custom made stainless steel scuppers, supplied by a dedicated booster pump. Colored concrete stepper pads lead to the 'Ipe' wood deck at the far end of the pool. The placement of this wood deck allowed us to minimize our use of retaining walls on the Northeast end of the yard, since it drops off over three feet below the elevation of the pool beam. One of the most unique features on this project has to be the structure over the dining area. With a unique combination of steel and wood, the clean modern aesthetic of this structure creates a visual stamp in the space that standard structure could not accomplish. 4" steel posts, painted charcoal grey, are set on an angle, 4' into the bedrock, to anchor the structure. Steel I-beams painted in green-yellow color--aptly called "frolic"--act as the base to the hefty cedar rafters of the roof structure, which has a slight pitch toward the rear. A hidden gutter on the back of the roof sends water down a copper rain chain, and into the drainage system. The backdrop for both this dining area , as well as the living area, is the horizontal screen panel, created with alternating sizes of cedar planks, stained to a calm hue of dove grey.
Ethridge Residence
Ethridge Residence
Cornerstone Architects
Located on a small infill lot in central Austin, this residence was designed to meet the needs of a growing family and an ambitious program. The program had to address challenging city and neighborhood restrictions while maintaining an open floor plan. The exterior materials are employed to define volumes and translate between the defined forms. This vocabulary continues visually inside the home. On this tight lot, it was important to openly connect the main living areas with the exterior, integrating the rear screened-in terrace with the backyard and pool. The Owner's Suite maintains privacy on the quieter corner of the lot. Natural light was an important factor in design. Glazing works in tandem with the deep overhangs to provide ambient lighting and allows for the most pleasing views. Natural materials and light, which were critical to the clients, help define the house to achieve a simplistic, clean demeanor in this historic neighborhood. Photography by Jerry Hayes
Riggs Place Residence
Riggs Place Residence
Soler Architecture
The L-shaped layout envelopes the pool area to create an indoor-outdoor space.
Example of a trendy rectangular pool design in Los Angeles
Contemporary II
Contemporary II
Pool Environments, Inc.
Randy Angell, Designer At the back of the property we created a curved wall, in a brilliant chartreuse stucco to act as an artful backdrop to our preserved bamboo sculptural installation. At the base of the bamboo we created a custom fire feature, which follows the arc of the wall for 14', finished with fire glass, and disappearing behind a charcoal grey stucco accent wall. The opening in the accent wall has a rain curtain, falling into the same fire glass, suggesting an intermingling of fire and water, and creating a veiled view of the fire beyond.
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